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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917452

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a highly contagious respiratory disease. Infection with the virus can occur with differing symptom severity, from mild and moderate to severe cases, but the long-term consequences of infection have not been fully identified or studied. Long COVID is defined as occurring in individuals with a history of probable or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and symptoms persisting for at least two months within three months of onset that cannot be explained by an alternative diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to look for factors that influence the type and severity of Long COVID symptoms. In total, 932 individuals with a history of COVID-19 were qualified for the study using an original questionnaire based on the COVID-19 Yorkshire Rehab Screen (C19-YRS) questionnaire. Older adults were more likely to report problems with mobility (p < 0.001) and in performing daily activities (p = 0.014). Those with a higher BMI showed significantly more symptoms such as dyspnea at rest (p < 0.001) and on exertion (p < 0.001), feelings of chronic fatigue (p = 0.023), problems with mobility (p < 0.001), and in performing daily activities (p = 0.002). The data show that those with Long COVID should receive multidisciplinary help including additional medical and psychological support. Particular attention should be paid to elderly and obese persons, who should be included in rehabilitation programs after COVID-19 in the first place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Clin Med ; 9(9)2020 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389406

ABSTRACT

There are considerable psychological and psychiatric consequences of the pandemic. Researchers have started to take into account the real or perceived sense of social threats that may be expressed, such as anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. However, analyses on pandemic-related anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders mostly rarely addresses the situation of people with autoimmune diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the mental health factors among people with systemic lupus erythematosus by quantifying the severity of anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. In total, 723 people took part in the study. The study group consisted of 134 individuals with a systemic lupus erythematosus. The control group consisted of 589 people without systemic lupus erythematosus. The regression adjusted by age, gender, and diagnosis of other chronic diseases showed individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus were at a much higher risk of elevated symptoms of anxiety on the GAD-7 scale (OR = 3.683; p < 0.001), depression on the PHQ-9 scale (OR = 4.183; p < 0.001), and sleep disorders on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scale (OR = 6.781; p < 0.001). Therefore, the mental health of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in the times of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is not only an extremely important medical problem but also a social one and must require special attention.

3.
Brain Sci ; 11(8)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335003

ABSTRACT

Despite the high number of studies on mental health among healthcare workers, only a few have attempted to assess the mental health of people with chronic diseases during the COVID-19 crisis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, and depression among people with chronic diseases working in healthcare and in other professions. The study participants were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 441 healthcare workers, and the second consisted of 572 non-healthcare professionals. Correlation analysis showed a strong correlation between autoimmune diseases and an increase in GAD-7 scale, ISI score, and PHQ-9 scale. Therefore, only autoimmune diseases were included for further analyses as a predictor of insomnia, depression, and anxiety. After adjusting the results for gender, age, smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and profession, the group with autoimmune diseases showed a more than a 2-fold increase in the risk of anxiety symptoms, a more than 2.5-fold increase in the risk of depressive symptoms, and a 4-fold increase in the risk of insomnia symptoms. This study shows that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the incidence of insomnia, anxiety disorders, and depressive disorders may depend on the pre-existent health status of an individual rather than on their profession.

4.
J Clin Med ; 10(6)2021 Mar 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136510

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic highlighted the serious problems of health care systems but also threatened the mental and physical health of patients worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess psychological health and insomnia in people with chronic diseases in the time of elevated stress associated with the pandemic. The study involved 879 people from Zachodniopomorskie province in Poland. Each participant provided basic demographic data, data on symptoms of insomnia, depression, anxiety and information on concomitant diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, heart failure, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Hashimoto's disease and smoking cigarettes. Chronic diseases included in this study showed a strong correlation between Hashimoto's disease and increase scores according to the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, r = 0.797, p < 0.001), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7, r = 0.766, p < 0.001) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9, r = 0.767, p < 0.001). After the results were corrected for age, gender, diagnosed hypertension, dyslipidemia and cigarette smoking, it was confirmed that the diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease was associated with an increased risk of anxiety (odds ratio (OR) = 2.225; p < 0.001), depression (OR = 2.518; p < 0.001) and insomnia (OR = 3.530; p < 0.001). Our study showed that during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic patients with Hashimoto's disease show a higher risk of insomnia, anxiety and depression.

5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(16)2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717732

ABSTRACT

It seems that the medical personnel in contact with patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at an especially high risk of adverse psychological effects. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the mental health factors among healthcare workers by quantifying the severity of anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders during the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, while taking into account coexisting diseases. The study involved 441 healthcare professionals including 206 healthcare workers at emergency wards, infectious wards, and intensive care units. The control group consisted of 235 healthcare workers working in wards other than those where individuals from the study group worked. Regression adjusted by age, gender, the occurrence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, asthma, autoimmune diseases, and cigarette smoking showed the elevated risk of anxiety on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale (OR = 1.934; p < 0.001), depression on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) scale (OR = 2.623; p < 0.001), and sleep disorders on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scale (OR = 3.078; p < 0.001). Our study showed that healthcare workers who are exposed to SARS-CoV-2-infected patients at emergency wards, infectious wards, and intensive care units are at a much higher risk of showing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders than healthcare workers working in other wards.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
7.
Brain Sciences ; 10(7):465, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-651559

ABSTRACT

Since the end of 2019, the whole world has been struggling with the pandemic of the new Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Available evidence suggests that pain is a common symptom during Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). According to the World Health Organization, many patients suffer from muscle pain (myalgia) and/or joint pain (arthralgia), sore throat and headache. The exact mechanisms of headache and myalgia during viral infection are still unknown. Moreover, many patients with respiratory failure get admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for ventilatory support. Pain in ICU patients can be associated with viral disease itself (myalgia, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathies), may be caused by continuous pain and discomfort associated with ICU treatment, intermittent procedural pain and chronic pain present before admission to the ICU. Undertreatment of pain, especially when sedation and neuromuscular blocking agents are used, prone positioning during mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may trigger delirium and cause peripheral neuropathies. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge regarding challenges associated with pain assessment and management in COVID-19 patients. A structured prospective evaluation should be undertaken to analyze the probability, severity, sources and adequate treatment of pain in patients with COVID-19 infection.

8.
J Clin Med ; 9(6)2020 Jun 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609200

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, appeared, causing a wide range of symptoms, mainly respiratory infection. In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic, therefore the efforts of scientists around the world are focused on finding the right treatment and vaccine for the novel disease. COVID-19 has spread rapidly over several months, affecting patients across all age groups and geographic areas. The disease has a diverse course; patients may range from asymptomatic to those with respiratory failure, complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). One possible complication of pulmonary involvement in COVID-19 is pulmonary fibrosis, which leads to chronic breathing difficulties, long-term disability and affects patients' quality of life. There are no specific mechanisms that lead to this phenomenon in COVID-19, but some information arises from previous severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) epidemics. The aim of this narrative review is to present the possible causes and pathophysiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with COVID-19 based on the mechanisms of the immune response, to suggest possible ways of prevention and treatment.

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