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1.
European Journal of Social Psychology ; 53(4):645-663, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20245434

ABSTRACT

During a pandemic, it is vital to identify factors that motivate individuals to behave in ways that limit virus transmission (i.e., anti‐COVID‐19 behaviour). Fear has been suggested to motivate health‐oriented behaviour, yet fear of the virus (i.e., fear of COVID‐19) could have unintended consequences, such as an increase in anti‐immigrant prejudice. In a three‐wave longitudinal study (NT1 = 4275) in five European countries from April to October 2020, we investigated how social norms, the impact of the pandemic on individuals, and intergroup contact affected fear of COVID‐19 and—or in turn—anti‐COVID‐19 behaviour and prejudice towards immigrants. A latent change score model—distinguishing between intra‐ and inter‐individual changes in outcomes—indicated that fear of COVID‐19 influenced neither anti‐COVID‐19 behaviour nor prejudice. Anti‐COVID‐19 behaviour was increased by anti‐COVID‐19 norms (i.e., belief that others perform anti‐COVID‐19 behaviours), while prejudice was influenced by positive and negative direct and mass‐mediated intergroup contact.

2.
European Journal of Social Psychology ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2127684

ABSTRACT

During a pandemic, it is vital to identify factors that motivate individuals to behave in ways that limit virus transmission (i.e., anti-COVID-19 behaviour). Fear has been suggested to motivate health-oriented behaviour, yet fear of the virus (i.e., fear of COVID-19) could have unintended consequences, such as an increase in anti-immigrant prejudice. In a three-wave longitudinal study (N-T1 = 4275) in five European countries from April to October 2020, we investigated how social norms, the impact of the pandemic on individuals, and intergroup contact affected fear of COVID-19 and-or in turn-anti-COVID-19 behaviour and prejudice towards immigrants. A latent change score model--distinguishing between intra- and inter-individual changes in outcomes--indicated that fear of COVID-19 influenced neither anti-COVID-19 behaviour nor prejudice. Anti-COVID-19 behaviour was increased by anti-COVID-19 norms (i.e., belief that others perform anti-COVID-19 behaviours), while prejudice was influenced by positive and negative direct and mass-mediated intergroup contact.

3.
Eur J Soc Psychol ; 51(6): 862-877, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222613

ABSTRACT

We examined the link between constructive patriotism, glorification, and conventional patriotism and COVID-19-related attitudes and behaviors at different stages of the pandemic in Poland. In Study 1 (N = 663), constructive patriotism was positively associated with support for internal measures (e.g., raising awareness about health practices). Glorification was negatively linked to support for such measures and positively connected to support for external measures (e.g., closing the borders). In Study 2 (N = 522), constructive patriots showed greater compliance with hygiene and social distance practices. In Study 3 (N = 633), the attribution of responsibility for fighting the crisis to the state and particularly to individuals underlined the link between constructive patriotism and compliance with health practices. Additionally, constructive patriotism was linked to support for international collaboration. Study 4 (N = 1051), conducted on a representative sample, further corroborated these findings. The results regarding conventional patriotism were not consistent across studies.

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