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1.
Acta Medica Iranica ; 59(6):322-326, 2021.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1761376

ABSTRACT

The aim of the current study was to investigate the rates of stress, anxiety, and depression among people in south Iran (a group from the general population without a history of any chronic medical problems, and cohorts of patients were recruited from epilepsy, diabetes, and cardiac disease clinics). We surveyed a sample of people during September 2020: a group of the general population without a history of any chronic medical problems, people with epilepsy, people with diabetes mellitus (DM), and people with cardiac problems. The survey included four general questions and two COVID-19 specific questions [contracting COVID-19, relatives with COVID-19]. Furthermore, the survey included the DASS (Depression-Anxiety-Stress Scale)-21 questionnaire. 487 people were surveyed (154 people with epilepsy, 127 patients with DM, 98 people with cardiac problems, and 108 healthy individuals). Among people without a history of any chronic medical illnesses, 14% had any psychological problems. The highest rates of depression and anxiety were observed among patients with DM (52% and 57%, respectively), and the highest rate of increased stress was observed among people with cardiac problems (40%). The existence of any underlying medical problem was significantly associated with higher rates of depression, anxiety, and stress among the participants. While many patients with underlying chronic medical conditions suffer from depression, anxiety, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, we cannot establish a cause and effect relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and increased psychological problems among these patients.

2.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1563-1601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468319

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders significantly impact the world's economy due to their often chronic and life-threatening nature afflicting individuals which, in turn, creates a global disease burden. The Group of Twenty (G20) member nations, which represent the largest economies globally, should come together to formulate a plan on how to overcome this burden. The Neuroscience-20 (N20) initiative of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) is at the vanguard of this global collaboration to comprehensively raise awareness about brain, spine, and mental disorders worldwide. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the various brain initiatives worldwide and highlight the need for cooperation and recommend ways to bring down costs associated with the discovery and treatment of neurological disorders. Our systematic search revealed that the cost of neurological and psychiatric disorders to the world economy by 2030 is roughly $16T. The cost to the economy of the United States is $1.5T annually and growing given the impact of COVID-19. We also discovered there is a shortfall of effective collaboration between nations and a lack of resources in developing countries. Current statistical analyses on the cost of neurological disorders to the world economy strongly suggest that there is a great need for investment in neurotechnology and innovation or fast-tracking therapeutics and diagnostics to curb these costs. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, SBMT, through this paper, intends to showcase the importance of worldwide collaborations to reduce the population's economic and health burden, specifically regarding neurological/brain, spine, and mental disorders.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , International Cooperation , Mental Disorders , Nervous System Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Burden of Disease/organization & administration , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Global Health/economics , Global Health/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/economics , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Nervous System Diseases/economics , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurosciences/methods , Neurosciences/trends , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-3, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461912

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of different groups of people in Iran on their willingness to receive a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed a sample (based on consecutive referrals) of 5 groups of people in late 2020: a group of the general population from Shiraz (without a history of any chronic medical or psychiatric problems), patients with epilepsy, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), patients with cardiac problems, and patients with psychiatric problems. The survey included 4 general questions and 3 COVID-19-specific questions. RESULTS: A total of 582 people participated. In total, 66 (11.3%) people expressed that they were not willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Psychiatric disorders (odds ratio [OR]: 3.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31-7.60; P = 0.006) and male sex (OR: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.23-3.58; P = 0.010) were significantly associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSION: Vaccine hesitancy is a global issue. Patients with psychiatric disorders had the highest rate of vaccine hesitancy. Previous studies have shown that depression and anxiety are associated with a reduced adherence to the recommended medical advice. Why male sex is associated with vaccine hesitancy is not clear. Researchers should investigate the rates and the factors affecting the vaccine hesitancy in their corresponding communities.

4.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-3, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139652

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of face mask wearing among different groups of people in south Iran. We also investigated the associations between mask wearing hesitancy and various factors. METHODS: We surveyed a sample (convenience sampling) of 5 groups of people: general population, people with epilepsy, people with diabetes mellitus (DM), people with cardiac problems, and people with psychiatric problems. The survey included 4 general questions (age, sex, education, and medical/psychiatric problem) and 4 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-specific questions (contracting COVID-19, relatives with COVID-19, wearing a face mask while in crowded places, and the frequency of daily hand washings). RESULTS: A total of 582 people (153 people with epilepsy, 127 patients with DM, 98 people with cardiac problems, 96 patients with psychiatric disorders, and 108 healthy individuals) participated. Twenty-eight (4.8%) people expressed that they do not wear a face mask when at crowded places. A lower education and less frequent daily hand washings had associations with mask wearing hesitancy. CONCLUSIONS: Mask wearing hesitancy is a concern during a respiratory viral disease pandemic. Paying attention to personal variables, especially if they are modifiable (eg, education and hygiene), is probably productive and practical in promoting mask wearing culture.

5.
Brain Behav ; 11(5): e02025, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014008

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of December 2019, a novel respiratory infection, initially reported in China, known as COVID-19 initially reported in China, and later known as COVID-19, led to a global pandemic. Despite many studies reporting respiratory infections as the primary manifestations of this illness, an increasing number of investigations have focused on the central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the CNS presentations in COVID-19 patients in an attempt to identify the common CNS features and provide a better overview to tackle this new pandemic. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, Web of Science, Ovid, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Included studies were publications that reported the CNS features between 1 January 2020 and 20 April 2020. The data of selected studies were screened and extracted independently by four reviewers. Extracted data analyzed by using STATA statistical software. The study protocol registered with PROSPERO (CRD42020184456). RESULTS: Of 2,353 retrieved studies, we selected 64 studies with 11,687 patients after screening. Most of the studies were conducted in China (58 studies). The most common CNS symptom of COVID-19 was headache (8.69%, 95%CI: 6.76%-10.82%), dizziness (5.94%, 95%CI: 3.66%-8.22%), and impaired consciousness (1.90%, 95%CI: 1.0%-2.79%). CONCLUSIONS: The growing number of studies has reported COVID-19, CNS presentations as remarkable manifestations that happen. Hence, understanding the CNS characteristics of COVID-19 can help us for better diagnosis and ultimately prevention of worse outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Diseases/complications , Central Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , China/epidemiology , Dizziness/complications , Headache/complications , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(3): 1279-1282, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009045

ABSTRACT

The accurate diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease can protect children from unnecessary diagnostic procedures and treatments. Also, the co-occurrence of rare diseases with other diseases can improve or worsen the symptoms of the patients.

7.
Epilepsy Behav ; 115: 107734, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003143

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the rates of contracting COVID-19 in various populations to provide evidence on the susceptibility of patients with epilepsy (PWE) to contracting symptomatic COVID-19. METHODS: We surveyed a random sample of three groups of people: patients with epilepsy, people with psychiatric problems, and a group of the general population. The survey included four general questions (age, sex, education, and medical/psychiatric problem) and four COVID-19 specific questions (contracting COVID-19, relatives with COVID-19, wearing a face mask, and frequent hand washings). RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty -eight people were surveyed (108 healthy individuals, 154 patients with epilepsy, and 96 patients with psychiatric problems). Thirty-eight (11%) people had a history of COVID-19 contraction. The only factor that had a significant association with COVID-19 contraction was a relative with COVID-19 (Odds Ratio: 5.82; 95% Confidence Interval: 2.85-11.86; p = 0.0001). Having epilepsy did not increase the risk of COVID-19 contraction. CONCLUSION: Symptomatic COVID-19 does not seem to be more likely in PWE. The single most important factor associated with contracting COVID-19 is a close relative with this infection. Isolation of people with SARS-CoV-2 infection and observation of their close contacts may reduce the risk of secondary infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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