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1.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2092603

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 underscored the importance of building resilient health systems and hospitals. Nevertheless, evidence on hospital resilience is limited without consensus on the concept, its application, or measurement, with practical guidance needed for action at the facility-level. Aim This study establishes a baseline for understanding hospital resilience, exploring its 1) conceptualization, 2) operationalization, and 3) evaluation in the empirical literature. Methods Following Arksey and O'Malley's model, a scoping review was conducted, and a total of 38 articles were included for final extraction. Findings and discussion In this review, hospital resilience is conceptualized by its components, capacities, and outcomes. The interdependence of six components (1) space, 2) stuff, 3) staff, 4) systems, 5) strategies, and 6) services) influences hospital resilience. Resilient hospitals must absorb, adapt, transform, and learn, utilizing all these capacities, sometimes simultaneously, through prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery, within a risk-informed and all-hazard approach. These capacities are not static but rather are dynamic and should improve continuously occur over time. Strengthening hospital resilience requires both hard and soft resilience. Hard resilience encompasses the structural (or constructive) and non-structural (infrastructural) aspects, along with agility to rearrange the space while hospital's soft resilience requires resilient staff, finance, logistics, and supply chains (stuff), strategies and systems (leadership and coordination, community engagement, along with communication, information, and learning systems). This ultimately results in hospitals maintaining their function and providing quality and continuous critical, life-saving, and essential services, amidst crises, while leaving no one behind. Strengthening hospital resilience is interlinked with improving health systems and community resilience, and ultimately contributes to advancing universal health coverage, health equity, and global health security. The nuances and divergences in conceptualization impact how hospital resilience is applied and measured. Operationalization and evaluation strategies and frameworks must factor hospitals' evolving capacities and varying risks during both routine and emergency times, especially in resource-restrained and emergency-prone settings. Conclusion Strengthening hospital resilience requires consensus regarding its conceptualization to inform a roadmap for operationalization and evaluation and guide meaningful and effective action at facility and country level. Further qualitative and quantitative research is needed for the operationalization and evaluation of hospital resilience comprehensively and pragmatically, especially in fragile and resource-restrained contexts.

2.
East Mediterr Health J ; 27(5): 431-432, 2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257543

ABSTRACT

New estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that about 1 in 3 women globally will face gender-based violence in their lifetime. The WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region has the third-highest prevalence of violence against women worldwide, with 31% of everpartnered women experiencing physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence at some point in their lives. Specific groups of women and girls, such as migrants and undocumented workers, women with disabilities, and women affected by armed conflict or in emergency settings are more vulnerable and may experience multiple forms of violence. Health emergencies, as demonstrated during the current COVID-19 pandemic, may also increase the risk of violence against women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Mediterranean Region/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Violence
3.
Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal ; 26(6):626-629, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1220407

ABSTRACT

[...]work has been done to support implementation of a package of emergency care tools including: the Integrated Interagency Triage Tool (prehospital, routine and mass casualty);Emergency Medical and Trauma Care Checklists;the Basic Emergency Care - an open-access training course for frontline health-care providers who manage acute illness and injury with limited resources;and the International Registry of Trauma and Emergency care to help gather essential data about the performance of emergency care systems (6,7). Despite countries' efforts to control patient flow by directing suspected COVID-19 patients to dedicated facilities, many "self-present" to facilities of their choosing. [...]patients presenting for unrelated emergencies (e.g., trauma) may also be co-infected with COVID-19 - whether or not they are symptomatic. Additionally, many EMR countries lack legislation guaranteeing access to emergency care for all (a key WHO Health System Building Block under governance), which limits access to marginal communities (10). Since the Region is host to the largest number of displaced persons in the world, region-specific guidance has been developed to guide health system response to COVID-19 in the context of displacement (22). [...]there is a paucity of high-quality published data on emergency care systems in the Region and an urgent need for operational research to understand the emergency care needs and emergency care systems performance in EMR countries.

4.
East Mediterr Health J ; 26(6): 626-629, 2020 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634614

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic began as a cluster of reported cases of acute respiratory illness in China on 31 December 2019 and went on to spread with exponential growth across the globe. By the time it was characterized as a global pandemic on 11 March 2020, 17 of 22 countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) had reports of infected persons. EMR countries are particularly susceptible to such outbreaks due to the presence of globally interconnected markets; complex emergencies in more than half of the countries; religious mass gatherings that draw tens of millions of pilgrims annually; and variation in emergency care systems capacity and health systems performance within and between countries.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Epidemiology/education , International Cooperation , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Public Health/education , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mediterranean Region/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , World Health Organization
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