Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 28
Filter
1.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(9):383-384, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2080622
2.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(8):7678-7684, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010533

ABSTRACT

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) and health authorities have devoted significant attention to understanding risk factors for coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) and their role in disease outcomes including tumer necrosis factor. In addition, diabetes may lead to lung dysfunction, such as decreased forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity. Therefore, diabetes could possibly be a risk factor for covid-19. Our study aims to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with severe covid-19 with diabetes mellitus, and the association of diabetes with the outcome in patients with severe covid-19. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in a period between November 2021 and March 2022, blood was taken from patients (80) with covid-19. Samples were taken from patients who were present in Al-Zahraa teaching hospital in Iraq. A total of samples were subjected to laboratory examinations including Tumor necrosis factor α using specific ELISA Kit. Result: The result of this observational study was depending on the analysis of data from 80 COVID-19 patients. All selected sociodemographic features, disease indicators, and history of chronic disease were listed as frequencies and percentages. The mean age was 52 years old. The SPO2 for those patients was ranged from 79 to 95% with a mean equal to 90.10 ±3.48. All patients showed elevated CRP value with a mean = 83.52. More than half of the sample (52.5%) were females and near half of the (48.8%) were overweighted when calculate their BMI. The majority (92.5%) mentioned having no family history of diabetes mellitus and 95% of them have no any other diagnosed chronic disease. Near two thirds (67.5%) were prescribed steroid in the treatment regime for their COVID-19 infection. Mean difference of TNF was tested among positive Covid-19 having diabetic status, results showed that.

3.
International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education ; 14(1):3192-3198, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1979665

ABSTRACT

When COVID-19 prevailed, the educational system was shifted to online rather than traditional to facilitate the learning process. This study aimed at exploring the impacts of online learning techniques on the students' Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). A total of 155 randomly selected students currently studying M. Phill education at the University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan participated in this study. Data were collected through validated, pre-tested and reliable questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Findings unveiled that online learning techniques improved the learning abilities, personality traits and teaching styles as perceived by the respondents which further improved the CGPA of students. Within the effects on learning abilities, enabling students to judicious use of technology, multimedia, observation and clearing the concepts were major improvements which helped students to attain an increase in CGPA. As for as effects on personality traits were concerned, social interaction enhanced communication skills and improvement in understanding, social skills and confidence led the students to get high CGPA. Moreover, online learning improved the teaching styles by integrating video lectures, immediate results assessment and easy access to the technology were key drivers of the increase in CGPA. This study suggested a hybrid educational system at the University of Agriculture Faisalabad for effective learning in students.

4.
International Conference on Business and Technology , ICBT 2021 ; 495 LNNS:54-63, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1971456

ABSTRACT

Interest in data of various forms and sizes has risen in recent years, and it has become a defining aspect of modern period. The use of digital transformation strategies and their role in recovering from the consequences of the Corona pandemic, particularly in financial institutions, is the focus of this case study on Islamic banks. This study examines the big data analysis cycle for five Islamic banks’ data in the 2019/2020 era. In addition to following the five steps of the big data analysis cycle and concentrating on the phase of developing a model in order to produce graphical results that can be studied. It will make use of Google Data Studio, which is one of the greatest tools for analyzing large amounts of data. On the other hand, after creating the relevant hypotheses, it will explore possible scenarios and the visuals that result. Finally, there are visualizations and reports that assist decision-makers and investors in evaluating bank performance before to and during the Corona pandemic, making it easier to follow financial performance and conduct of banks. The research also considers the consequences of bank graphical reporting and considers whether hypotheses to help capture all statistical results in visual form are required. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

5.
Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution ; 19(3):103-107, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1875363

ABSTRACT

The increasing interdependence between the countries of the world has led to an increase in the risks faced by societies in general. The COVID-19 pandemic, for example, has transcended national borders, affecting people regardless of nationality, level of education, income or gender. As for its consequences, it has affected the most vulnerable groups. In this study, we have considered the significance of low plasma homocysteine or hypohomocysteinemia and some parameters of the syndrome associated with COVID-19. Just as an increase in the level of homocysteine in plasma has a negative effect on the heart and blood vessels, its decrease may put the health of those who suffer from it at risk. Homocysteine is known to be the natural mediator of the conversion of methionine to cysteine;hence, the danger, as the latter is necessary for the production of glutathione, taurine and sulphate. In this study, homocysteine and some indicators of COVID-19 syndrome were examined using ELISA kit and other methods. The homocysteine level in the serum of people who recovered from COVID-19 was found to be lower than in normal and healthy people. Thus, it indicates that people who have been cured may suffer from hypohomocystinemia. We also study some parameters, such as ALP, GOT, GPT, Glucose level and HDL, cholesterol. The results showed a significant decrease in the level of GOT enzyme and HDL level. © 2022-IOS Press. All rights reserved.

6.
Journal of Sexual Medicine ; 19(5):S220-S221, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1839108

ABSTRACT

Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality seen in men, affecting 1 in 650 men. It is a group of chromosomal disorders with at least one extra X chromosome (47, XXY) occurring due to non-disjunction at the time of gametogenesis. Most adult men are diagnosed at the time of fertility investigations. However, the syndrome has an array of clinical presentations which patients require input from numerous medical specialities during their lifetime. The setting up of a national-access Klinefelter Syndrome multidisciplinary clinic (KSMDT) approach comprising Urology, Endocrinology, Genetics, Reproductive medicine, Radiology, Psychosexual medicine, a specialist pharmacist as well as a patient representative has led to improvements in fertility and long- term management and waiting times. Here we describe the patient-reported outcomes and clinician perspectives of the clinic as it approached its 1st year. Between 2019 and 2020, 72 patients were seen in the adult KS MDT clinic. To assess the quality of care received in the clinic, an 8 -point feedback questionnaire was given to each patient attending the clinic to fill out at the end of the clinic. The form included a space for feedback for each speciality involved. The feedback forms were reviewed by 2 individual researchers and entries were assessed using an adapted Likert scale (0 – 5). Clinicians involved in the clinic were also encouraged to attend and rate the other specialties, the effectiveness of the pre and post clinic MDTs and to describe achievements derived from KSMDT clinic team-working. All the patients (n = 72) took the questionnaire reported that the clinic was beneficial to their understanding of KS & its management and had enough time during consultations. In terms of scoring 86% were very satisfied (score = 5) about genetic consultation compared to 92%, 82%, 82% and 88% in endocrine, fertility, psychosexual and urology consultation, respectively. Key factors influencing these positive results included the presence of an MDT, the access to a patient liaison and knowledge of support groups during the consult, digitized patient information sheets and a cohesive approach between endocrine and fertility teams. Clinician feedback was positive with all members agreeing that the pre and post clinic MDTs allowed effective pinpointing of often missed issues (e.g. hormone induction, social issues). Key milestones for the clinic included the reduction in waiting times by almost 80%, securing funding for costly hormone medication and assisted reproduction, improving sperm retrieval rates (from 11 – 29%) and a thrombo-embolism awareness programme. The overall patient and clinician feedback for the adult KSMDT clinic was uniformly positive, with the multispecialty approach allowing communication with and between all relevant specialities on the same day, avoiding the need to come for multiple separate appointments across different sites (especially relevant during the COVID-19 era). The feedback has also been useful in developing patient information tools such as digital resources and has led to the development of a supportive community group for newly diagnosed KS men. More research is underway to investigate the complex issues affecting KS men long term, after fertility management. Work supported by industry: no. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Sexual Medicine is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

7.
British Journal of Surgery ; 109(SUPPL 1):i49, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1769157

ABSTRACT

Aim: COVID-19 had major effect on the health and medical education. In order to oblige with the social distancing and quarantine, universities shifted to online learning. This study aimed to assess the effect of online education on anatomy DR (dissection room) teaching by the use of telegram software. Method: This was a cross-sectional, prospective interventional study, which was carried out among 2nd year medical students in University of Khartoum. Students undertook initial tests on the heart and anterior abdominal wall modules. Telegram videos, prepared by the author, on the anatomy of the heart and the anterior abdominal wall were distributed to students. Students took a second test after watching the videos. A total number of 41 students attended heart sessions and 40 students attended the anterior abdominal wall sessions were included. Results: The pre-test mean score for the heart and abdomen modules were 4.56 ± 2.335 and 6.15 ± 2.94, respectively. The post-tests means were 9.98±2.877 and 8.95±3.14, respectively. 90% and 75% of the students were satisfied with these videos, respectively. Conclusions: This study revealed that Telegram videos as a method of online teaching had a positive effect on the students' performance, which was evidenced by the significant improvement in student's scores after watching the videos. Additionally, most of the students were satisfied with the videos and give positive feedback.

8.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(2):53-55, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1760919
9.
12th International Conference on Computing Communication and Networking Technologies, ICCCNT 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1752363

ABSTRACT

In this study, several aspects of the human body have been focused upon. This paper attempts to cast light on pre-and post-pathological conditions, man-machine interactions, human mindset, and ethics of AI. The paper emphasizes the cultural impacts of overeating, profuse drinking, and smoking habits. It uplifts the basic necessity of growing awareness schemes. Patients are seeking treatment in health care centers with the following serious pathological conditions and complications (We exclude the COVID-19 pandemic because it has been adequately publicized by media and press): Heart Attack, Stroke Cancer, Fatty liver & liver cirrhosis. Because of being the leading causes of sudden death prediction of heart attack is very important. Our main focus is to determine the best machine learning method. With optimal parameters, we evaluate the Dataset. Model Accuracy for the heart Attack Machine Learning Model was the highest for the Logistic Regression mode land it was 93.41%. On the contrary, the accuracy for Linear Regression Model was 60.10% which was the least. © 2021 IEEE.

10.
ASME 2021 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2021 ; 13, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1708350

ABSTRACT

At present, the world is undergoing a pandemic spawning from the advent of a new coronavirus outbreak known as COVID-19. As a result, hospital staff, paramedics, first responders, and the general world population have been forced to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) and take special measures to prevent catching the virus. Furthermore, because of this necessity, increasing demand on the PPE supply chain has generated many shortages, especially seen in masks designed to stop the inhalation of COVID-19 particles in the air. This inspired our group to design something that could help make PPE more accessible and affordable for the average person. The proposed is an almost entirely 3D printed design to help keep costs down and make it simplistic, such that anyone with a 3D printer has the potential to duplicate it. We hope that with the design, we can help combat the shortage and keep more people safe from COVID-19. Copyright © 2021 by ASME.

12.
Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326864

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 omicron variant in late November, 2021 and its rapid spread to different countries, warns the health authorities to take initiative to work on containing its spread. The omicron SARS-CoV-2 variant is unusual from the other variants of concerns reported earlier as it harbors many novel mutations in its genome particularly with >30 mutations in the spike glycoprotein alone. The current study investigated the variation in binding mechanism which it carries compared to the wild type. The study also explored the interaction profile of spike-omicron with human ACE2 receptor. The structure of omicron spike glycoprotein was determined though homology modeling. The interaction analysis was performed through docking using HADDOCK followed by binding affinity calculation. Finally, the comparison of interactions were performed among spike-ACE2 complex of wild type, delta and omicron variants. The interaction analysis has revealed the involvement of highly charged and polar residues (H505, Arg498, Ser446, Arg493, and Tyr501) in the interactions. The important novel interactions in the spike-ACE2-omicron complex was observed as S494:H34, S496:D38, R498:Y41, Y501:K353, and H505:R393 and R493:D38. Moreover, the binding affinity of spike-ACE2-omicron complex (-17.6Kcal/mol) is much higher than wild type-ACE2 (-13.2Kcal/mol) and delta-ACE2 complex (-13.3Kcal/mol). These results indicate that the involvement of polar and charged residues in the interactions with ACE2 may have an impact on increased transmissibility of omicron variant.

13.
Bioscience Research ; 18:1-9, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1619262

ABSTRACT

The novel Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been spread from the Wuhan city of China has now affected many countries;it is still circulating worldwide. Consecutive studies of finding the RNA of this virus in sewage systems increase renewed interest about COVID-19 faucal transmission and its pathogenic issue on sanitation and wastewater systems. Municipal wastewater is typically remarked as one of the major end routes of different types of emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors, antibiotics, micro plastics, pesticide and heavy metal residues associated with antimicrobial resistance. Currently all available, antibodies based and molecular base testing have some limitations for this purpose: whole coronavirus particles instead of pure antigen proteins need to be tested in a short time and take control of the pandemic of COVID-19. The current study helped in understanding, concept and demonstrated the potential of graphene Field Effect Transistor (FET) technology for sensitive and rapid detection of corona viruses. Therefore, extra trustworthy, quick response, economical and broadly accessible analytical devices or diagnostic approaches are crucially required. We have critically reviewed and argued the biomarkers and indicators used for COVID-19 diagnostics or SARS-CoV-2 detection. In this regard, ultrasensitive graphene FET biosensors are powerful tools in early diagnosis of COVID-19 infection via targeting virus S1 protein to assess the clinical progress and offer awareness on severity and critical trends of infection.

14.
Blood ; 138:369, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582289

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is driven by aberrant leukemic stem cells (LSCs) that initiate and sustain malignancy. To circumvent resistance to therapy, combination therapies with additive mechanisms of action are needed. CD70, a tumor necrosis factor receptor ligand, and its receptor CD27 are expressed on LSCs and AML blasts, but not on hematopoietic stem cells. Cusatuzumab, a high-affinity humanized monoclonal anti-CD70 antibody, kills CD70-expressing cells by Fc domain-mediated effector functions and is a potent inhibitor of CD70-CD27 signaling. Here we report initial results of a study of cusatuzumab in combination with the current standard of care therapy, venetoclax plus azacitidine (CVA), in patients with untreated AML (de novo or secondary) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy due to age ≥75 years or medical comorbidities. Methods: The primary objective of this open label, multicenter, phase 1b study was to assess safety and tolerability of CVA. Key secondary objectives included response rate per ELN 2017 criteria and time to response. Patients received cusatuzumab 10 or 20 mg/kg IV on Day 3 and Day 17, a 3-day ramp-up of venetoclax (100, 200, and 400 mg PO) followed by 400 mg daily dosing, and azacitidine 75 mg/m 2 SC or IV on Days 1-7 of each 28-day cycle. Results: Based on data through Jul 9, 2021, 44 patients enrolled with median age 75 years (range 32-89), 36.4% had secondary AML, 40.9% had an ECOG performance status of 2, and ELN risk was favorable, intermediate and adverse in 18.2%, 20.5% and 61.4%, respectively. All patients received 20 mg/kg cusatuzumab except for 3 patients who received a starting dose of 10 mg/kg with the option to escalate to 20 mg/kg. Of these 3 patients, 1 escalated to 20 mg/kg. At a median follow-up of 29.1 weeks, the median number of treatment cycles was 4.0 (range 1.0-11.0). Grade 3 or above TEAEs were reported in 97.7% of patients;the most common (reported in ≥10%) were neutropenia (68.2%), thrombocytopenia (65.9%), febrile neutropenia (36.4%), anemia (34.1%), leukopenia (29.5%), sepsis (27.3%), and lymphopenia (15.9%). Treatment-emergent serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported in 75% of patients;the most common (reported in at least ≥5%) were febrile neutropenia (27.3%), sepsis (22.7%), COVID-19 (6.8%), and thrombocytopenia (6.8%). Treatment-emergent SAEs of grade ≥3 were reported in 72.7% of the patients. Infusion-related reactions (IRRs) were reported for 11.4% of patients with 2.3% at grade ≥3. Six (13.6%) patients discontinued treatment due to AEs, and 5 (11.4%) TEAEs resulted in death. The mortality rate within 30 days from start of treatment was 4.5%. Table 1 summarizes best response to study treatment. In the intent-to-treat analysis set (n=44) complete remission (CR) rate was 45.5%, while CR + CR with partial hematologic recovery (CRh) + CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (CRi) was 77.3%;MLFS was observed in 11.4% of patients. Of 34 responders (defined as CR, CRi or CRh), 47% were MRD negative by flow cytometry at or after achievement of response. Median time to first response for patients who achieved CR, CRh or CRi was 4.21 (3.0-25.0) weeks. Best response rates in the post-hoc response evaluable analysis set (n=42) that excluded two patients who died before the first disease evaluation were: CR in 47.6%, CR + CRh + CRi in 81.0% and MLFS in 11.9% of patients (Table 1). The majority (97.1%) of responders experienced at least one cycle delay in administration of CVA post response. Conclusions: Cusatuzumab administered in combination with venetoclax and azacitidine to elderly patients with untreated AML was generally well tolerated and demonstrated a safety profile consistent with that previously reported with venetoclax-azacitidine, with the addition of generally manageable IRRs. Response rates support an additive effect of cusatuzumab to the standard of care with potential for improved clinical outcomes. However, further clinical trials are needed for validation of these initial results. HK and GB contributed equally to this publ cation. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Roboz: AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Janssen: Research Funding;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy;Jasper Therapeutics: Consultancy;Agios: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Amgen: Consultancy;Blueprint Medicines: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy;Helsinn: Consultancy;Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy;Glaxo SmithKline: Consultancy;Celgene: Consultancy;Jazz: Consultancy;MEI Pharma - IDMC Chair: Consultancy;Mesoblast: Consultancy;Actinium: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy;Astex: Consultancy;Bayer: Consultancy;Astellas: Consultancy;Roche/Genentech: Consultancy;Pfizer: Consultancy;Otsuka: Consultancy. Aribi: Seagen: Consultancy. Brandwein: Astellas: Honoraria;Jazz: Honoraria;Amgen: Honoraria;Taiho: Honoraria;BMS/Celgene: Honoraria;Pfizer: Honoraria;Abbvie: Honoraria;University of Alberta: Current Employment. Döhner: Astellas: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria;Berlin-Chemie: Consultancy, Honoraria;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Agios: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;GEMoaB: Consultancy, Honoraria;Helsinn: Consultancy, Honoraria;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Jazz: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Oxford Biomedicals: Consultancy, Honoraria;Pfizer: Research Funding;Roche: Consultancy, Honoraria;Gilead: Consultancy, Honoraria;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Astex: Consultancy, Honoraria;Ulm University Hospital: Current Employment. Fiedler: Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: support for meeting attendance;Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria;Morphosys: Consultancy;Celgene: Consultancy;Pfizer: Consultancy, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy;ARIAD/Incyte: Consultancy;Amgen: Consultancy, Other: support for meeting attendance, Patents & Royalties, Research Funding;Servier: Consultancy, Other: support for meeting attendance;Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy, Other: support for meeting attendance;Stemline: Consultancy. Gandini: argenx: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Divested equity in a private or publicly-traded company in the past 24 months. Geddes: University of Calgary: Current Employment;Taiho: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Jazz: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Consultancy;BMS: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Consultancy;Paladin: Consultancy;Janssen: Research Funding;Geron: Research Funding;Abbvie: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Hou: University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hillman Cancer Centers: Current Employment;AbbVie: Honoraria;AstraZeneca: Honoraria;Karyopharm: Honoraria;Chinese American Hematology Oncology Network: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Howes: Janssen R&D, part of Johnson & Johnson: Current Employment;Johnson & Johnson: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company, Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company. Hultberg: argenx: Current Employment, Patents & Royalties. Huselton: University of Rochester: Current Employment. Jacobs: Argenx BV: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company;University of Antwerp: Ended employment in the past 24 months. Kane: Janssen R&D, part of Johnson & Johnson: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Lech-Marańda: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AbbVie: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors r advisory committees;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Roche: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Janssen-Cilag: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Gilead: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Louwers: argenx: Current Employment, Patents & Royalties: Patents (no royalties). Nottage: Janssen R&D, part of Johnson & Johnson: Current Employment;Johnson & Johnson: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company, Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company. Platzbecker: Novartis: Honoraria;AbbVie: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria;Celgene/BMS: Honoraria;Geron: Honoraria;Takeda: Honoraria. Rampal: Pharmaessentia: Consultancy;BMS/Celgene: Consultancy;Abbvie: Consultancy;Sierra Oncology: Consultancy;Incyte: Consultancy, Research Funding;Blueprint: Consultancy;Disc Medicine: Consultancy;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy;Constellation: Research Funding;Kartos: Consultancy;Stemline: Consultancy, Research Funding;CTI: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Memorial Sloan Kettering: Current Employment. Salman: Janssen: Current Employment, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company, Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company. Shah: Janssen R&D, part of Johnson & Johnson: Current Employment. Stuart: Clinical Drug Development Consultants LLC: Current Employment;Argenx: Consultancy;Cleave Therapeutics: Consultancy;Triphase Accelerator Corp: Consultancy;IgM Biosciences: Consultancy;Revolution Medicines: Consultancy;Jiya Corp:Consultancy;Geron Corp: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Subklewe: Janssen: Consultancy;Pfizer: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau;Takeda: Speakers Bureau;Klinikum der Universität München: Current Employment;MorphoSys: Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Roche: Research Funding;Seattle Genetics: Consultancy, Research Funding;Miltenyi: Research Funding;Gilead: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;BMS/Celgene: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau. Sumbul: argenx: Current Employment. Wang: Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board;Astellas: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Stemline Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board, Speakers Bureau;AbbVie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Kite Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board;GlaxoSmithKline: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board;Genentech: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS/Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;DAVA Oncology: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau;Kura Oncology: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board, steering committee, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board;Mana Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board, Speakers Bureau;Rafael Pharmaceuticals: Other: Data safety monitoring committee;Gilead: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board;Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board;PTC Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Advisory board;Genentech: Consultancy;MacroGenics: Consultancy. Wierzbowska: Jazz: Research Funding;Pfizer: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Astellas: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory comm ttees;Abbvie: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS: Honoraria. Yao: Statagize LLC: Current Employment;Puma Biotechnology, Inc.: Ended employment in the past 24 months;Argenx: Consultancy. Yee: Astex: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Janssen: Research Funding;TaiHo: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Otsuka: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Onconova: Research Funding;Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Tolero: Research Funding;Novartis: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Paladin: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;MedImmune: Research Funding;AbbVie: Honoraria;Bristol-Myers Squibb/Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Shattuck Labs: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Forma Therapeutics: Research Funding;Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Geron: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;F. Hoffmann La Roche: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Jazz: Research Funding. Kantarjian: Immunogen: Research Funding;Astra Zeneca: Honoraria;KAHR Medical Ltd: Honoraria;Astellas Health: Honoraria;Pfizer: Honoraria, Research Funding;NOVA Research: Honoraria;Ascentage: Research Funding;Precision Biosciences: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria, Research Funding;Aptitude Health: Honoraria;Ipsen Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria;Jazz: Research Funding;Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding;BMS: Research Funding;Amgen: Honoraria, Research Funding;AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding;Taiho Pharmaceutical Canada: Honoraria. Borthakur: Protagonist: Consultancy;Ryvu: Research Funding;Astex: Research Funding;GSK: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: Current Employment;ArgenX: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.

15.
2021 International Conference on Innovation and Intelligence for Informatics, Computing, and Technologies, 3ICT 2021 ; : 112-119, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1537664

ABSTRACT

The importance of studying organizations' continuity of follow-up mechanisms is raised by the absence of research conducted on the follow-up mechanisms, especially during sudden pandemics. Therefore, this study attempts to research the continuity of follow-up mechanisms organizations use to monitor projects progress and accomplishment. Also, explore the predictors, problems, and challenges for managing remote working. Follow-up is the monitoring and evaluation of project progress against standards to enable management to make decisions for interventions towards project completion through team communication. Findings show that continuity of follow-up practice during COVID-19 is influenced by remote monitoring challenges and Organization compliance to pandemic restrictions (R2 = 0.35). Organization compliance to pandemic restrictions is a function of three determinants related to the organization's behavior regarding monitoring structure, internal policies, and communication and resource facilities (R2 = 0.54). Researchers used the mixed method approach consist of quantitative and qualitative methods. A survey was randomly distributed to an achievable sample of 158 respondents, followed by interviews with twelve decision-makers, including managers and executives in selected organizations. The study suggests more technological tools and applications for improving followup performance and overcoming remote monitoring challenges. © 2021 IEEE.

16.
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications ; 12(9):491-507, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1529044

ABSTRACT

Internet of Things (IoT) technological assistance for infectious disease surveillance is urgently needed when outbreaks occur, especially during pandemics. The IoT has great potential as an active digital surveillance system, since it can provide meaningful time-critical data needed to design infectious disease surveillance. Many studies have developed the IoT for such surveillance;however, such designs have been developed based on authors' ideas or innovations, without consideration of a specific reference model. Therefore, it is essential to build such a model that could encompass end-to-end IoT-based surveillance system design. This paper proposes a reference model for the design of an active digital surveillance system of infectious diseases with IoT technology. It consists of 14 attributes with specific indicators to accommodate IoT characteristics and to meet the needs of infectious disease surveillance design. The proof of concept was conducted by adopting the reference model into an IoT system design for the active digital surveillance of the Covid-19 disease. The use-case of the design was a communitybased surveillance (CBS) system utilizing the IoT to detect initial symptoms and prevent closed contacts of Covid-19 in a nursing home. We then elaborated its compliance with the 14 attributes of the reference model, reflecting how the IoT design should meet the criteria mandated by the model. The study finds that the proposed reference model could eventually benefit engineers who develop the complete IoT design, as well as epidemiologists, the government or the relevant policy makers who work in preventing infectious diseases from worsening. © 2021. All Rights Reserved.

17.
Irish Medical Journal ; 114(8), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1456752

ABSTRACT

Aims We aimed to conduct a narrative review on the direct and indirect psychological implications of COVID-19, amongst the pregnant population. Methods Two medical databases (PUBMED and EMBASE) were analysed and papers describing the psychological impact of COVID-19 on pregnant women were included. Results We identified a total of 35 papers in our study, 14% (5/35) focused on first time mothers, 71% (25 /35) on depression among pregnant persons, 83% (29/35) examined anxiety, 40% (14 /35) described the impact of stress and 43% (15/35) included a discussion on fear. The most common stressors were fear of contracting COVID-19 and uncertainty surrounding the situation Protective factors include having accurate information regarding COVID-19, a higher level of education and a secure income Conclusion COVID-19 has had significant psychological effects amongst the pregnant population including increased levels of anxiety, depression, fear and stress. Many individuals experience suicidal ideation. Social isolation and increasing rates of emotional and physical abuse may be significant factors. Consideration needs to be given to enhance social support and self-care routines. Exercise has shown to alleviate some stress, anxiety and other subjective symptoms. Professional assistance and knowledge have also shown to decrease the severity of these effects.

18.
O'Toole, A.; Hill, V.; Pybus, O. G.; Watts, A.; Bogoch, II, Khan, K.; Messina, J. P.; consortium, Covid- Genomics UK, Network for Genomic Surveillance in South, Africa, Brazil, U. K. Cadde Genomic Network, Tegally, H.; Lessells, R. R.; Giandhari, J.; Pillay, S.; Tumedi, K. A.; Nyepetsi, G.; Kebabonye, M.; Matsheka, M.; Mine, M.; Tokajian, S.; Hassan, H.; Salloum, T.; Merhi, G.; Koweyes, J.; Geoghegan, J. L.; de Ligt, J.; Ren, X.; Storey, M.; Freed, N. E.; Pattabiraman, C.; Prasad, P.; Desai, A. S.; Vasanthapuram, R.; Schulz, T. F.; Steinbruck, L.; Stadler, T.; Swiss Viollier Sequencing, Consortium, Parisi, A.; Bianco, A.; Garcia de Viedma, D.; Buenestado-Serrano, S.; Borges, V.; Isidro, J.; Duarte, S.; Gomes, J. P.; Zuckerman, N. S.; Mandelboim, M.; Mor, O.; Seemann, T.; Arnott, A.; Draper, J.; Gall, M.; Rawlinson, W.; Deveson, I.; Schlebusch, S.; McMahon, J.; Leong, L.; Lim, C. K.; Chironna, M.; Loconsole, D.; Bal, A.; Josset, L.; Holmes, E.; St George, K.; Lasek-Nesselquist, E.; Sikkema, R. S.; Oude Munnink, B.; Koopmans, M.; Brytting, M.; Sudha Rani, V.; Pavani, S.; Smura, T.; Heim, A.; Kurkela, S.; Umair, M.; Salman, M.; Bartolini, B.; Rueca, M.; Drosten, C.; Wolff, T.; Silander, O.; Eggink, D.; Reusken, C.; Vennema, H.; Park, A.; Carrington, C.; Sahadeo, N.; Carr, M.; Gonzalez, G.; Diego, Search Alliance San, National Virus Reference, Laboratory, Seq, Covid Spain, Danish Covid-19 Genome, Consortium, Communicable Diseases Genomic, Network, Dutch National, Sars-CoV-surveillance program, Division of Emerging Infectious, Diseases, de Oliveira, T.; Faria, N.; Rambaut, A.; Kraemer, M. U. G..
Wellcome Open Research ; 6:121, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450989

ABSTRACT

Late in 2020, two genetically-distinct clusters of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with mutations of biological concern were reported, one in the United Kingdom and one in South Africa. Using a combination of data from routine surveillance, genomic sequencing and international travel we track the international dispersal of lineages B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 (variant 501Y-V2). We account for potential biases in genomic surveillance efforts by including passenger volumes from location of where the lineage was first reported, London and South Africa respectively. Using the software tool grinch (global report investigating novel coronavirus haplotypes), we track the international spread of lineages of concern with automated daily reports, Further, we have built a custom tracking website (cov-lineages.org/global_report.html) which hosts this daily report and will continue to include novel SARS-CoV-2 lineages of concern as they are detected.

19.
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene ; 62(2):E326-E328, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1353412
20.
Archives of Pharmacy Practice ; 12(2):40-44, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1305065

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has increased the generalized anxiety among nursing staff. This cross-sectional questionnaire-based study aimed to determine the generalized anxiety disorders among the nursing staff working in secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Punjab province, Pakistan. A GAD-7 scale was used to assess anxiety. Non-parametric statistics were applied to estimate the difference among the groups. Multiple regression model was adopted to explore the impact of covariates on the GAD-7 score. A total of 133 nurses responded to this survey. It was revealed that being female (7.38 +/- 4.20, p=0.032) and having an age of >= 31 years (7.68 +/- 5.14) might lead to a higher GAD-7 score. 19.6% of the respondents had a high level of generalized anxiety (GAD-7 score >= 10), and about 49.6% were falling in the range of mild anxiety. Female nursing staff have the probability of higher GAD-7 score up to 15% [0.148(-0.450 - 4.697), p= 0.049]. Job experience, especially being new to the field (<= 3 years) might increase the likelihood of having a higher GAD-7 score by 14%. In conclusion, 19.6% of the respondents were meeting the GAD-7 criteria of moderate-severe level of generalized anxiety and depressive disorder. Being female, having less job experience, and no training on how to handle COVID patients were revealed to the main factors influencing the GAD-7 score. Risk of getting COVID, transmission of COVID to family members through them, and uncertainty about the consequence of COVID in Pakistan were some of the common stressors reported by the nurses who participated in this study.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL