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1.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 152: 113223, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1944323

ABSTRACT

The health crisis caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 highlights the need to identify new treatment strategies for this viral infection. During the past year, over 400 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) treatment patents have been registered; nevertheless, the presence of new virus variants has triggered more severe disease presentations and reduced treatment effectiveness, highlighting the need for new treatment options for the COVID-19. This study evaluates the Metformin Glycinate (MG) effect on the SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and in vivo viral load. The in vitro study was conducted in a model of Vero E6 cells, while the in vivo study was an adaptive, two-armed, randomized, prospective, longitudinal, double-blind, multicentric, and phase IIb clinical trial. Our in vitro results revealed that MG effectively inhibits viral replication after 48 h of exposure to the drug, with no cytotoxic effect in doses up to 100 µM. The effect of the MG was also tested against three variants of interest (alpha, delta, and epsilon), showing increased survival rates in cells treated with MG. These results are aligned with our clinical data, which indicates that MG treatment reduces SARS-CoV2-infected patients´ viral load in just 3.3 days and supplementary oxygen requirements compared with the control group. We expect our results can guide efforts to position MG as a therapeutic option for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metformin , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Metformin/pharmacology , Metformin/therapeutic use , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
2.
Am J Transplant ; 22(7): 1852-1860, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937907

ABSTRACT

Despite the benefits of abdominal normothermic regional perfusion (A-NRP) for abdominal grafts in controlled donation after circulatory death (cDCD), there is limited information on the effect of A-NRP on the quality of the cDCD lungs. We aimed to study the effect of A-NRP in lungs obtained from cDCD and its impact on recipients´ outcomes. This is a study comparing outcomes of lung transplants (LT) from cDCD donors (September 2014 to December 2021) obtained using A-NRP as the abdominal preservation method. As controls, all lung recipients transplanted from donors after brain death (DBD) were considered. The primary outcomes were lung recipient 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year survival. A total of 269 LT were performed (60 cDCD and 209 DBD). There was no difference in survival at 3 months (98.3% cDCD vs. 93.7% DBD), 1 year (90.9% vs. 87.2%), and 5 years (68.7% vs. 69%). LT from the cDCD group had a higher rate of primary graft dysfunction grade 3 at 72 h (10% vs. 3.4%; p <  .001). This is the largest experience ever reported with the use of A-NRP combined with lung retrieval in cDCD donors. This combined method is safe for lung grafts presenting short-term survival outcomes equivalent to those transplanted through DBD.


Subject(s)
Liver Transplantation , Lung Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Brain Death , Death , Graft Survival , Humans , Liver Transplantation/methods , Organ Preservation/methods , Perfusion/methods , Retrospective Studies , Tissue Donors
4.
Investigación Clínica ; 62(Suplemento 2):27-42, 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1818974

ABSTRACT

Hyperglycemia, with or without diabetes, is associated with complications in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. There is no informa- tion regarding this problem in our region. This study was aimed to compare the characteristics and in-hospital clinical course of patients with a probable diagnosis of COVID-19, with and without hyperglycemia during the hospital- ization. This is a retrospective, observational study of clinical records review of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The ISARIC-WHO form was used for data collection. Hyperglycemia was defined as a fasting value 140 mg/dL ac- cording to standard glycaemia targets in hospitalized patients. A total of 148 patients were included, 97 (65.5%) men and 51 (34.5%) women, with a mean age of 64.1..16.1 years;of which 42/148 (28.4%) patients reported previous diabetes, 60/148 (40.5%) patients had hyperglycemia during the hospitaliza- tion and 32/60 (53.3%) of these cases did not report previous diabetes. The patients with hyperglycemia were older, received more frequently systemic cor- ticosteroids (96.6 vs 82.6%;p=0.01), and antibiotics (68.3 vs 44.3%;p=0.01), had worse baseline oxygenation parameters (SpO 2 88.1..11.7%;vs 92.8..5.5%;p=0.02, PaO 2 /FiO 2, 194.4..119.7 vs 270.9..118.3;p<0.001), higher total lung severity score in the chest CT (14.9..5.7 vs 11.1..6.3;p<0.001) and higher lev- els of baseline inflammatory markers (CRP 6.73..3.61 vs 5.08..4.21;p<0.01, LDH 342.9..118.4 vs 296.5..161.4;p=0.01 and Ferritin 687.7..373.2 vs 542.6..395.3;p=0.01). Mortality (34.5 vs 10.7%;p<0.001) and admission to ICU (43.3 vs 7.9%;p<0.001) were higher in patients with hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is a marker of seve- re disease and poor prognosis.

5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 6519, 2022 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805649

ABSTRACT

Massive molecular testing for COVID-19 has been pointed out as fundamental to moderate the spread of the pandemic. Pooling methods can enhance testing efficiency, but they are viable only at low incidences of the disease. We propose Smart Pooling, a machine learning method that uses clinical and sociodemographic data from patients to increase the efficiency of informed Dorfman testing for COVID-19 by arranging samples into all-negative pools. To do this, we ran an automated method to train numerous machine learning models on a retrospective dataset from more than 8000 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 from April to July 2020 in Bogotá, Colombia. We estimated the efficiency gains of using the predictor to support Dorfman testing by simulating the outcome of tests. We also computed the attainable efficiency gains of non-adaptive pooling schemes mathematically. Moreover, we measured the false-negative error rates in detecting the ORF1ab and N genes of the virus in RT-qPCR dilutions. Finally, we presented the efficiency gains of using our proposed pooling scheme on proof-of-concept pooled tests. We believe Smart Pooling will be efficient for optimizing massive testing of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling/methods
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310075

ABSTRACT

Massive molecular testing for COVID-19 has been pointed out as fundamental to moderate the spread of the pandemic. Pooling methods can enhance testing efficiency, but they are viable only at low incidences of the disease. We propose Smart Pooling, a machine learning method that uses clinical and sociodemographic data from patients to increase the efficiency of informed Dorfman testing for COVID-19 by arranging samples into all-negative pools. To do this, we ran an automated method to train numerous machine learning models on a retrospective dataset from more than 8,000 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 from April to July 2020 in Bogotá, Colombia. We estimated the efficiency gains of using the predictor to support Dorfman testing by simulating the outcome of tests. We also computed the attainable efficiency gains of non-adaptive pooling schemes mathematically. Moreover, we measured the false-negative error rates in detecting the ORF1ab and N genes of the virus in RT-qPCR dilutions. Finally, we presented the efficiency gains of using our proposed pooling scheme on proof-of-concept pooled tests. We believe Smart Pooling will be efficient for optimizing massive testing of SARS-CoV-2.

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-305245

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of COVID-19 triggered an unparalleled effort towards the development of a vaccine given that vaccination is currently the most important strategy available for controlling the pandemic. Achieving high levels of vaccination coverage is key to this approach, and requires knowledge of user satisfaction levels. Thus, the objective of this work was to determine the levels of satisfaction with the COVID-19 vaccination program among vaccinated school workers.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study which included the staff from educational centres invited for vaccination over 4 days at the Hospital General University Hospital of Alicante. The survey included sociodemographic variables, 13 questions on satisfaction with the vaccination program, and one open question for further suggestions. Satisfaction was calculated globally for each question and specifically by employing Student t -tests;the association between each variable and a high level of satisfaction was analysed with Chi-squared tests. Results Of 9,869 professionals invited, 9,261 attended the appointment;5,756 were offered the possibility of participating in this survey and 2,989 (51.9%) accepted. The highest overall scores were assigned to the treatment patients received at the ‘registration point’ and the care they received from nurses during the vaccination. The aspect for which the lowest levels of satisfaction were registered was for the information received prior to vaccination. Sex and place of work were significantly associated with a high degree of satisfaction.Conclusions Understanding people’s perception of vaccination programs is essential to implementing improvements and to increase vaccination coverage. The level of satisfaction among school personnel was remarkably high, especially in relation to the treatment and attention they received at different points during the vaccination care circuit.

8.
Front Med Technol ; 3: 772275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637014

ABSTRACT

Despite vaccines are the main strategy to control the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic, their effectiveness could not be enough for individuals with immunosuppression. In these cases, as well as in patients with moderate/severe COVID-19, passive immunization with anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulins could be a therapeutic alternative. We used caprylic acid precipitation to prepare a pilot-scale batch of anti-SARS-CoV-2 intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) from plasma of donors immunized with the BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) anti-COVID-19 vaccine (VP-IVIg) and compared their in vitro efficacy and safety with those of a similar formulation produced from plasma of COVID-19 convalescent donors (CP-IVIg). Both formulations showed immunological, physicochemical, biochemical, and microbiological characteristics that meet the specifications of IVIg formulations. Moreover, the concentration of anti-RBD and ACE2-RBD neutralizing antibodies was higher in VP-IVIg than in CP-IVIg. In concordance, plaque reduction neutralization tests showed inhibitory concentrations of 0.03-0.09 g/L in VP-IVIg and of 0.06-0.13 in CP-IVIg. Thus, VP-IVIg has in vitro efficacy and safety profiles that justify their evaluation as therapeutic alternative for clinical cases of COVID-19. Precipitation with caprylic acid could be a simple, feasible, and affordable alternative to produce formulations of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IVIg to be used therapeutically or prophylactically to confront the COVID-19 pandemic in middle and low-income countries.

9.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295526

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VoC) show reduced neutralization by vaccine-induced and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We tested therapeutic equine polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against four VoC (alpha, beta, epsilon and gamma). We show that equine pAbs efficiently neutralize VoC, suggesting they are an effective, broad coverage, low-cost and a scalable COVID-19 treatment.

10.
Pharmacotherapy ; 41(11): 884-906, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525482

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The results of studies of tocilizumab (TCZ) in COVID-19 are contradictory. Our study aims to update medical evidence from controlled observational studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the use of TCZ in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We searched the following databases from January 1, 2020 to April 13, 2021 (date of the last search): MEDLINE database through the PubMed search engine and Scopus, using the terms ("COVID-19" [Supplementary Concept]) AND "tocilizumab" [Supplementary Concept]). RESULTS: Sixty four studies were included in the present study: 54 were controlled observational studies (50 retrospective and 4 prospective) and 10 were RCTs. The overall results provided data from 20,616 hospitalized patients with COVID-19: 7668 patients received TCZ in addition to standard of care (SOC) (including 1915 patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with reported mortality) and 12,948 patients only receiving SOC (including 4410 patients admitted to the ICU with reported mortality). After applying the random-effects model, the hospital-wide (including ICU) pooled mortality odds ratio (OR) of patients with COVID-19 treated with TCZ was 0.73 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.56-0.93). The pooled hospital-wide mortality OR was 1.25 (95% CI = 0.74-2.18) in patients admitted at conventional wards versus 0.66 (95% CI = 0.59-0.76) in patients admitted to the ICU. The pooled OR of hospital-wide mortality (including ICU) of COVID-19 patients treated with TCZ plus corticosteroids (CS) was 0.67 (95% CI = 0.54-0.84). The pooled in-hospital mortality OR was 0.71 (95% CI = 0.35-1.42) when TCZ was early administered (≤10 days from symptom onset) versus 0.83 (95% CI 0.48-1.45) for late administration (>10 days from symptom onset). The meta-analysis did not find significantly higher risk for secondary infections in COVID-19 patients treated with TCZ. CONCLUSIONS: TCZ prevented mortality in patients hospitalized for COVID-19. This benefit was seen to a greater extent in patients receiving concomitant CS and when TCZ administration occurred within the first 10 days after symptom onset.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
11.
Lancet Reg Health Eur ; 11: 100243, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether the changes in critical care throughout the pandemic have improved the outcomes in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in adults with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to 73 ICUs from Spain, Andorra and Ireland between February 2020 and March 2021. The first wave corresponded with the period from February 2020 to June 2020, whereas the second/third waves occurred from July 2020 to March 2021. The primary outcome was ICU mortality between study periods. Mortality predictors and differences in mortality between COVID-19 waves were identified using logistic regression. FINDINGS: As of March 2021, the participating ICUs had included 3795 COVID-19 pneumonia patients, 2479 (65·3%) and 1316 (34·7%) belonging to the first and second/third waves, respectively. Illness severity scores predicting mortality were lower in the second/third waves compared with the first wave according with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system (median APACHE II score 12 [IQR 9-16] vs 14 [IQR 10-19]) and the organ failure assessment score (median SOFA 4 [3-6] vs 5 [3-7], p<0·001). The need of invasive mechanical ventilation was high (76·1%) during the whole study period. However, a significant increase in the use of high flow nasal cannula (48·7% vs 18·2%, p<0·001) was found in the second/third waves compared with the first surge. Significant changes on treatments prescribed were also observed, highlighting the remarkable increase on the use of corticosteroids to up to 95.9% in the second/third waves. A significant reduction on the use of tocilizumab was found during the study (first wave 28·9% vs second/third waves 6·2%, p<0·001), and a negligible administration of lopinavir/ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine, and interferon during the second/third waves compared with the first wave. Overall ICU mortality was 30·7% (n = 1166), without significant differences between study periods (first wave 31·7% vs second/third waves 28·8%, p = 0·06). No significant differences were found in ICU mortality between waves according to age subsets except for the subgroup of 61-75 years of age, in whom a reduced unadjusted ICU mortality was observed in the second/third waves (first 38·7% vs second/third 34·0%, p = 0·048). Non-survivors were older, with higher severity of the disease, had more comorbidities, and developed more complications. After adjusting for confounding factors through a multivariable analysis, no significant association was found between the COVID-19 waves and mortality (OR 0·81, 95% CI 0·64-1·03; p = 0·09). Ventilator-associated pneumonia rate increased significantly during the second/third waves and it was independently associated with ICU mortality (OR 1·48, 95% CI 1·19-1·85, p<0·001). Nevertheless, a significant reduction both in the ICU and hospital length of stay in survivors was observed during the second/third waves. INTERPRETATION: Despite substantial changes on supportive care and management, we did not find significant improvement on case-fatality rates among critical COVID-19 pneumonia patients. FUNDING: Ricardo Barri Casanovas Foundation (RBCF2020) and SEMICYUC.

13.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 735853, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436006

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern show reduced neutralization by vaccine-induced and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies; therefore, treatment alternatives are needed. We tested therapeutic equine polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that are being assessed in clinical trials in Costa Rica against five globally circulating variants of concern: alpha, beta, epsilon, gamma and delta, using plaque reduction neutralization assays. We show that equine pAbs efficiently neutralize the variants of concern, with inhibitory concentrations in the range of 0.146-1.078 µg/mL, which correspond to extremely low concentrations when compared to pAbs doses used in clinical trials. Equine pAbs are an effective, broad coverage, low-cost and a scalable COVID-19 treatment.

14.
J Hum Lact ; 37(4): 639-648, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adherence to the Ten Steps of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative has been shown to have a protective role for the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding. RESEARCH AIMS: (1) To determine the breastfeeding rate during the first 6 months of life in children of mothers diagnosed with COVID-19 infection at the time of birth; and (2) to assess the possible influence of being born in a center with Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative accreditation. METHODS: This was a two-group comparative longitudinal observational study of infants born to mothers with COVID-19 at the time of birth, between March 13-May 31, 2020 (the first wave of the pandemic) in Spain. Fourteen Spanish hospitals participated, five (35.7%) were Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative accredited. Type of feeding was assessed prospectively at discharge, 1, 3, and 6 months of age. A total of 248 newborns were included in the study. RESULTS: A total of 117 (47.3%) newborns were born in Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) accredited centers. These centers applied skin-to-skin contact with greater probability (OR = 1.9; 95% CI [1.18, 3.29]) and separated the newborns from their mothers less frequently (OR = 0.46; 95% CI [0.26, 0.81]) than non-accredited centers. No differences were observed in relation to the presence of a companion at the time of birth. At discharge, 49.1% (n = 57) of newborns born in BFHI-accredited centers received exclusive breastfeeding versus 35.3% (n = 46) in non-accredited centers (p = .03). No differences were observed in breastfeeding rates throughout follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The exclusive breastfeeding rate at discharge in children of mothers with COVID-19 infection at birth was higher in Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative accredited centers, which most frequently applied skin-to-skin contact at birth as well as rooming-in.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Child , Female , Health Promotion , Hospitals , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mothers , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9825, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223113

ABSTRACT

In the current global emergency due to SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, passive immunotherapy emerges as a promising treatment for COVID-19. Among animal-derived products, equine formulations are still the cornerstone therapy for treating envenomations due to animal bites and stings. Therefore, drawing upon decades of experience in manufacturing snake antivenom, we developed and preclinically evaluated two anti-SARS-CoV-2 polyclonal equine formulations as potential alternative therapy for COVID-19. We immunized two groups of horses with either S1 (anti-S1) or a mixture of S1, N, and SEM mosaic (anti-Mix) viral recombinant proteins. Horses reached a maximum anti-viral antibody level at 7 weeks following priming, and showed no major adverse acute or chronic clinical alterations. Two whole-IgG formulations were prepared via hyperimmune plasma precipitation with caprylic acid and then formulated for parenteral use. Both preparations had similar physicochemical and microbiological quality and showed ELISA immunoreactivity towards S1 protein and the receptor binding domain (RBD). The anti-Mix formulation also presented immunoreactivity against N protein. Due to high anti-S1 and anti-RBD antibody content, final products exhibited high in vitro neutralizing capacity of SARS-CoV-2 infection, 80 times higher than a pool of human convalescent plasma. Pre-clinical quality profiles were similar among both products, but clinical efficacy and safety must be tested in clinical trials. The technological strategy we describe here can be adapted by other producers, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Horses/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunization/methods , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
16.
Br J Pharmacol ; 177(21): 4873-4886, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998831

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has overwhelmed healthcare systems requiring the rapid development of treatments, at least, to reduce COVID-19 severity. Drug repurposing offers a fast track. Here, we discuss the potential beneficial effects of statins in COVID-19 patients based on evidence that they may target virus receptors, replication, degradation, and downstream responses in infected cells, addressing both basic research and epidemiological information. Briefly, statins could modulate virus entry, acting on the SARS-CoV-2 receptors, ACE2 and CD147, and/or lipid rafts engagement. Statins, by inducing autophagy activation, could regulate virus replication or degradation, exerting protective effects. The well-known anti-inflammatory properties of statins, by blocking several molecular mechanisms, including NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasomes, could limit the "cytokine storm" in severe COVID-19 patients which is linked to fatal outcome. Finally, statin moderation of coagulation response activation may also contribute to improving COVID-19 outcomes. LINKED ARTICLES: This article is part of a themed issue on The Pharmacology of COVID-19. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v177.21/issuetoc.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 17(18):6642, 2020.
Article | MDPI | ID: covidwho-762652

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychological impact of confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, considering any protective factors, such as the practice of meditation or self-compassion, and their relationship with different lifestyles and circumstances of adults residing in Spain. A cross-sectional study was done using an anonymous online survey in which 412 participants filled out the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-2;the Impact of Events Scale;and the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, reporting severe symptomatology of posttraumatic stress and mild anxiety and depression. Quality of cohabitation and age were found to be key variables in the psychological impact of confinement. The impact of confinement was more negative for those who reported very poor cohabitation as opposed to very good (F (3, 405) = 30.75, p ≤0.001, d = 2.44, r = 0.054) or for those under 35 years of age compared to those over 46 (F (2, 409) = 5.14, p = 0.006, d = 0.36). Practicing meditation was not revealed as a protective factor, but self-compassion was related to better cohabitation during confinement (F (3, 403) = 11.83, p ≤0.001, d = 1.05). These results could be relevant in designing psychological interventions to improve coping and mental health in other situations similar to confinement.

19.
Acta Paediatr ; 109(11): 2302-2308, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689795

ABSTRACT

AIM: Our aim was to describe the clinical features of mothers infected with COVID-19 and examine any potential vertical mother to newborn transmission. We also assessed how effective the discharge recommendations were in preventing transmission during the first month of life. METHODS: This multicentre descriptive study involved 16 Spanish hospitals. We reviewed the medical records of 42 pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 from March 13, 2020, to March 29, 2020, when they were in their third trimester of pregnancy. They and their newborn infants were monitored until the infant was 1 month old. RESULTS: Over half (52.4%) of the women had a vaginal delivery. The initial clinical symptoms were coughing (66.6%) and fever (59.5%), and one mother died due to thrombo-embolic events. We admitted 37 newborn infants to the neonatal unit (88%), and 28 were then admitted to intermediate care for organisational virus-related reasons. No infants died, and no vertical transmission was detected during hospitalisation or follow-up. Only six were exclusively breastfed at discharge. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence of COVID-19 transmission in any of the infants born to COVID-19 mothers, and the post-discharge advice seemed effective. The measures to avoid transmission appeared to reduce exclusive breastfeeding at discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies
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