Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
Journal of fungi (Basel, Switzerland) ; 6(3), 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-750659

ABSTRACT

Coinfections with bacteria or fungi may be a frequent complication of COVID-19, but coinfections with Candida species in COVID-19 patients remain rare We report the 53-day clinical course of a complicated type-2 diabetes patient diagnosed with COVID-19, who developed bloodstream infections initially due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, secondly due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and lastly due to a possibly fatal Candida glabrata The development of FKS-associated pan-echinocandin resistance in the C glabrata isolated from the patient after 13 days of caspofungin treatment aggravated the situation The patient died of septic shock shortly before the prospect of receiving potentially effective antifungal therapy This case emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and monitoring for antimicrobial drug-resistant coinfections to reduce their unfavorable outcomes in COVID-19 patients

2.
Microbes Infect ; 2020 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744191

ABSTRACT

The Envelope (E) protein of SARS-CoV-2 is the most enigmatic protein among the four structural ones. Most of its current knowledge is based on the direct comparison to the SARS E protein, initially mistakenly undervalued and subsequently proved to be a key factor in the ER-Golgi localization and in tight junction disruption. We compared the genomic sequences of E protein of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and the closely related genomes of bats and pangolins obtained from the GISAID and GenBank databases. When compared to the known SARS E protein, we observed a significant difference in amino acid sequence in the C-terminal end of SARS-CoV-2 E protein. Subsequently, in silico modelling analyses of E proteins conformation and docking provide evidences of a strengthened binding of SARS-CoV-2 E protein with the tight junction-associated PALS1 protein. Based on our computational evidences and on data related to SARS-CoV, we believe that SARS-CoV-2 E protein interferes more stably with PALS1 leading to an enhanced epithelial barrier disruption, amplifying the inflammatory processes, and promoting tissue remodelling. These findings raise a warning on the underestimated role of the E protein in the pathogenic mechanism and open the route to detailed experimental investigations.

3.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743736

ABSTRACT

The increasing COVID-19 widespread has created the necessity to assess the diagnostic accuracy of newly introduced (RT-PCR based) assays for SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection in respiratory tract samples. We compared the results of the Allplex™ 2019-nCoV assay with those of the Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct assay and the Quanty COVID-19 assay, respectively, all performed on 125 nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples of patients with COVID-19 suspicion. Fifty-four samples were positive, and 71 were negative with the Allplex™ assay, whereas 47 of 54 samples were also positive with the Simplexa™ assay. The Quanty assay detected 55 positive samples, including the 54 positive samples with the Allplex™ assay and 1 sample that was Allplex™ negative but Simplexa™ positive. Using a consensus result criterion as the reference standard allowed to resolve the eight samples with discordant results (one Allplex™ negative and seven Simplexa™ negative) as truly false negative. Interestingly, a Spearman's negative association was found between the viral RNA loads quantified by the Quanty assay and the CT values of RT PCRs performed with either the Allplex™ assay or the Simplexa™ assay. However, the strength of this association was higher for the Allplex™ assay (N gene, ρ = - 0.92; RdRP gene, ρ = - 0.91) than for the Simplexa™ assay (ORF1ab gene, ρ = - 0.65; S gene, ρ = - 0.80). The Allplex™ 2019-nCoV, the Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct, and the Quanty COVID-19 assays yielded comparable results. However, the role these assays might play in future clinical practice warrants larger comparison studies.

6.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 2020 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669965

ABSTRACT

Since its first description in China, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide being declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. More than 10.3 million people have been infected and more than 506 000 people died. However, SARS-CoV-2 had a lower impact on the pediatric population. Only about 1% to 2% of infected people are children and few deaths under the age of 14 are described so far. In this article, we discuss microbiological and immunological characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children highlighting the main differences from adult SARS-CoV-2 infection.

7.
Biol. Proc. Online ; 1(22)20200725.
Article in English | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-670176

ABSTRACT

We analyzed the bacterial communities of the nasopharynx in 40 SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients. All infected patients had a mild COVID-19 disease. We did not find statistically significant differences in either bacterial richness and diversity or composition. These findings suggest a nasopharyngeal microbiota at least early resilient to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

8.
Br J Haematol ; 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652703

ABSTRACT

A low count of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes is a hallmark laboratory finding in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Using flow cytometry, we observed significantly higher CD95 (Fas) and PD-1 expression on both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in 42 COVID-19 patients when compared to controls. Higher CD95 expression in CD4+ cells correlated with lower CD4+ counts. A higher expression of CD95 in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes correlated with a lower percentage of naive events. Our results might suggest a shift to antigen-activated T cells, expressing molecules increasing their propensity to apoptosis and exhaustion during COVID-19 infection.

9.
Gut ; 69(9): 1555-1563, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634628

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an exponential increase in SARS-CoV-2 infections and associated deaths, and represents a significant challenge to healthcare professionals and facilities. Individual countries have taken several prevention and containment actions to control the spread of infection, including measures to guarantee safety of both healthcare professionals and patients who are at increased risk of infection from COVID-19. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has a well-established role in the treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection. In the time of the pandemic, FMT centres and stool banks are required to adopt a workflow that continues to ensure reliable patient access to FMT while maintaining safety and quality of procedures. In this position paper, based on the best available evidence, worldwide FMT experts provide guidance on issues relating to the impact of COVID-19 on FMT, including patient selection, donor recruitment and selection, stool manufacturing, FMT procedures, patient follow-up and research activities.


Subject(s)
Clostridium Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections , Donor Selection , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/methods , Gastroenterology , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , Change Management , Clostridium Infections/microbiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/trends , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Adjustment/methods , Risk Adjustment/standards
10.
Microbes Infect ; 22(4-5): 182-187, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626674

ABSTRACT

Envelope protein of coronaviruses is a structural protein existing in both monomeric and homo-pentameric form. It has been related to a multitude of roles including virus infection, replication, dissemination and immune response stimulation. In the present study, we employed an immunoinformatic approach to investigate the major immunogenic domains of the SARS-CoV-2 envelope protein and map them among the homologue proteins of coronaviruses with tropism for animal species that are closely inter-related with the human beings population all over the world. Also, when not available, we predicted the envelope protein structural folding and mapped SARS-CoV-2 epitopes. Envelope sequences alignment provides evidence of high sequence homology for some of the investigated virus specimens; while the structural mapping of epitopes resulted in the interesting maintenance of the structural folding and epitope sequence localization also in the envelope proteins scoring a lower alignment score. In line with the One-Health approach, our evidences provide a molecular structural rationale for a potential role of taxonomically related coronaviruses in conferring protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and identifying potential candidates for the development of diagnostic tools and prophylactic-oriented strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Epitope Mapping , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Humans , Models, Molecular , One Health , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Protein Conformation , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Analysis, Protein
12.
Microbes Infect ; 22(4-5): 182-187, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-346567

ABSTRACT

Envelope protein of coronaviruses is a structural protein existing in both monomeric and homo-pentameric form. It has been related to a multitude of roles including virus infection, replication, dissemination and immune response stimulation. In the present study, we employed an immunoinformatic approach to investigate the major immunogenic domains of the SARS-CoV-2 envelope protein and map them among the homologue proteins of coronaviruses with tropism for animal species that are closely inter-related with the human beings population all over the world. Also, when not available, we predicted the envelope protein structural folding and mapped SARS-CoV-2 epitopes. Envelope sequences alignment provides evidence of high sequence homology for some of the investigated virus specimens; while the structural mapping of epitopes resulted in the interesting maintenance of the structural folding and epitope sequence localization also in the envelope proteins scoring a lower alignment score. In line with the One-Health approach, our evidences provide a molecular structural rationale for a potential role of taxonomically related coronaviruses in conferring protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and identifying potential candidates for the development of diagnostic tools and prophylactic-oriented strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Epitope Mapping , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Humans , Models, Molecular , One Health , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Protein Conformation , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Analysis, Protein
13.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(8): 869-872, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-163401

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To date, no information on late-onset infection in newborns to mother with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contracted in pregnancy are available. This study aimed to evaluate postdischarge SARS-CoV-2 status of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy that, at birth, were negative to SARS-CoV-2. STUDY DESIGN: This is an observational study of neonates born to mothers with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). RESULTS: Seven pregnant women with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection have been evaluated in our institution. One woman had a spontaneous abortion at 8 weeks of gestational age, four women recovered and are still in follow-up, and two women delivered. Two newborns were enrolled in the study. At birth and 3 days of life, newborns were negative to SARS-CoV-2. At 2-week follow-up, one newborn tested positive although asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight the importance of follow-up of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy, since they remain at risk of contracting the infection in the early period of life and long-term consequences are still unknown. KEY POINTS: · Newborns to mothers with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy can acquire the infection later after birth.. · Newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy need a long-term follow-up, even if they tested negative at birth.. · Specific guidelines for the long-term follow-up of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy are needed..


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , Aftercare/standards , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/physiopathology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Needs Assessment , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Postnatal Care/methods , Postnatal Care/standards , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Time Factors
15.
Microbes Infect ; 22(4-5): 188-194, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-52542

ABSTRACT

Several research lines are currently ongoing to address the multitude of facets of the pandemic COVID-19. In line with the One-Health concept, extending the target of the studies to the animals which humans are continuously interacting with may favor a better understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 biology and pathogenetic mechanisms; thus, helping to adopt the most suitable containment measures. The last two decades have already faced severe manifestations of the coronavirus infection in both humans and animals, thus, circulating epitopes from previous outbreaks might confer partial protection from SARS-CoV-2 infections. In the present study, we provide an in-silico survey of the major nucleocapsid protein epitopes and compare them with the homologues of taxonomically-related coronaviruses with tropism for animal species that are closely inter-related with the human beings population all over the world. Protein sequence alignment provides evidence of high sequence homology for some of the investigated proteins. Moreover, structural epitope mapping by homology modelling revealed a potential immunogenic value also for specific sequences scoring a lower identity with SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid proteins. These evidence provide a molecular structural rationale for a potential role in conferring protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and identifying potential candidates for the development of diagnostic tools and prophylactic-oriented strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/genetics , Epitopes , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Computational Biology , Computer Simulation , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/immunology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Phylogeny , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Species Specificity
17.
Microbes Infect ; 22(4-5): 218-220, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11184

ABSTRACT

Outside the Hubei province, China, the mild form of infection and the progressive recover of the COVID-19 patients suggest the intervention of "unconventional" biological mechanisms worthy of attention. Based on the high-homology between the Spike protein epitopes of taxonomically-related coronaviruses, we hypothesized that past contact with infected dogs shield humans against the circulating SARS-CoV-2. Elseways, the recurrent virus exposure over a short time-lapse might result in the Antibody Dependent Enhancement, triggering the violent immune reaction responsible for the severe clinical outcomes observed in the Hubei province. Nevertheless, further experimental studies are desired for a confidential evaluation of the postulated hypotheses.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , Antigens, Viral/chemistry , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Dog Diseases/virology , Dogs , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunity , One Health , Pandemics , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Viral Tropism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL