Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Neurol Sci ; 2022 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826536

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to psychological consequences on people's mental health, representing a condition of increased vulnerability for the weakest sections of population, including elderly patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This longitudinal study aimed at exploring the impact of the most frequent non-motor symptoms and their contribute on health-related quality of life of PD patients after the COVID-19 outbreak, in comparison with the pre-pandemic status. METHODS: Forty-two non-demented PD patients underwent a first assessment between December 2018 and January 2020 (T0). Then, between March and May 2021 (T1), they were contacted again and asked to complete the second assessment. Levels of global functioning, several non-motor symptoms (i.e. depression, apathy, anxiety, anhedonia) and health-related quality of life were investigated. RESULTS: Results of the the paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that at T1, PD patients scored lower on the emotional subscale of the DAS, Z = - 2.49; p = 0.013; Cohen dz = 0.691. Higher scores of the TEPS total score, Z = - 2.38; p = 0.025; Cohen dz = 0.621, and LEDD, Z = - 2.63; p = 0.008; Cohen dz = 0.731, were also reported at T1. CONCLUSION: The present study suggested that self-isolation at home might lead to a reduction of apathy and anhedonia in PD patients due to the increase in social support provided by families during COVID-19 restrictions. This evidence brings out the need of a consistent and persistent social support which might be represented by caregivers or/and social assistive robotics.

2.
Pers Individ Dif ; 195: 111703, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815017

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the measures to avert contagion heavily impacted individuals' mental health. In the present cross-sectional study, we investigate the relationship between cognitive reserve, coping modalities and the perceived stress during a chronic stage of COVID-19 pandemic by online administration of three standardized questionnaires in a sample of healthy volunteers covering a large lifespan (18-85 years). We found that positive orientation to problems and higher levels of cognitive reserve were associated with lower levels of stress. Conversely, coping strategies involving negation, substance consumption, and appeal to other people and religion to face everyday life, together with higher education, were associated with higher levels of stress. These results shade light on the long-term psychological consequences of COVID-19 and call for the development of psychological interventions improving coping and cognitive reserve, to preserve and restore mental health following the pandemic.

3.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 61: 103774, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 pandemic caused relevant psychological consequences in the general population. Since people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) are usually at higher risk of psychological distress than age-matched healthy controls (HC), a meta-analytic study was conducted, aimed at evaluating i) differences between pwMS and HC in the psychological variables during the pandemic, ii) differences in the levels of anxiety, depression, stress, sleep disturbances and quality of life before and during the Covid-19 pandemic in pwMS. METHODS: The literature search on three electronic databases yielded 196 studies (113 after the duplicates removal). Seven studies compared psychological variables between pwMS and HC during the pandemic, while seven studies evaluated the pre- vs during the pandemic differences in pwMS. The following outcomes were selected: depression, anxiety, physical QoL, mental QoL, stress, sleep quality/disturbances. Mean weighted effect sizes (ES) were calculated using Hedges'g, via Prometa3 software. RESULTS: During the pandemic, pwMS showed higher levels of depression (g = 0.51, p=.001), anxiety (g = 0.41, p=.032), and stress (g = 0.51, p=.016) compared to HC. The comparison on psychological outcomes before and during the pandemic in pwMS revealed no significant increase during the pandemic on levels of anxiety (g = 0.08, p=.380), depression (g = 0.02, p=.772), mental QoL (g= -0.14, p=.060), physical QoL (g = 0.00, p=.986), whereas sleep quality deteriorated during the pandemic (g = 0.52, p<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with pre-pandemic literature, pwMS showed higher levels of psychological distress than HC also during the Covid-19 pandemic. Contrariwise, longitudinal studies revealed that, in pwMS, the only psychological-associated variable that worsened significantly was the sleep quality, but this outcome was evaluated only in two studies. Future studies will have to assess/evaluate the long-term psychological consequences of the pandemic on pwMS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
4.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(3)2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment has been reported in the aftermath of severe acute respiratory syndrome due to coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We investigated the possible association between cognitive impairment and the main clinical and functional status variables in a cohort of convalescent COVID-19 patients without premorbid diseases potentially affecting cognition. METHODS: We consecutively screened for inclusion of convalescent COVID-19 patients referring to a post-acute care facility for pulmonary rehabilitation. All the enrolled patients were assessed for cognitive functions. We also investigated features of psychological distress (anxiety, depression, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and quality of life) and cardiac and pulmonary functional status. RESULTS: The 63 enrolled patients (mean age 59.82 ± 10.78, male gender = 47) showed a high frequency of depressive symptoms (76.2%) and anxiety (55.5%), and a high prevalence of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, 44.4%). About half of the total sample showed reduced cognitive efficiency (RCE, 44.4%) in the domains of spatial and verbal long-term memory and executive functions. Patients with RCE more frequently showed alteration of blood pressure (BP) circadian rhythm (p = 0.01), higher levels of D-Dimer (p = 0.03), had experienced a severe illness (p = 0.02), had longer disease duration (p = 0.04), more clinically relevant symptoms of PTSD (p = 0.02), more frequent cognitive complaints (p = 0.002), higher anxiety scores (p = 0.01) and lower quality of life (p = 0.02) than patients with normal cognitive efficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated a possible association between the RCE after COVID-19 and some cardiological variables, including some indirect measures of a residual autonomic disorder, such as the presence of an altered BP circadian rhythm. Future research studies with large samples are needed to provide valid conclusions.

5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307745

ABSTRACT

Background: Anxiety, depression and reduction of quality of life (QoL) are common in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Fear of getting sick from COVID-19, government’s lockdown and the imposed social distancing might have an impact on psychological distress and QoL. Objectives: The aim of our study was to investigate anxiety, depression and QoL changes in pwMS during SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and lockdown in Italy. Methods: 67 pwMS with a previous (less than 6 months) neuropsychological evaluation before SARS-CoV-2 outbreak (T0) were re-evaluated at the time of the outbreak and lockdown in Italy (T1). They underwent a clinical and neurological evaluation (at T0) and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1), the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MsQoL-54) at T0 and T1. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Results: BDI-II and STAI-Y1 scores did not change between T0 and T1, whereas the satisfaction on sexual function subscale of MsQoL-54 was significantly higher at T1 ( p<0.001 ). Conclusions: This is the first study that evaluated mood and QoL levels before and during the lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic in pwMS. No worsening of anxiety and depression levels was found. Contrariwise, some improvements were noted on QoL, the most reliable regarding the sexual satisfaction.

6.
Neurol Sci ; 43(3): 1521-1532, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Individuals experienced psychological symptoms in response to quarantine for the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the possible effect of age and gender on the evolution of mental health status after the quarantine in the Italian population and the baseline predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. METHODS: An online follow-up questionnaire including an assessment of depression, anxiety, anger, post-traumatic stress, subjective cognitive failures, resilience, and coping style was completed by participants 2 months after the end of the quarantine (n = 758). RESULTS: Individuals experienced psychological symptoms also 2 months after the end of the quarantine. No decrease in depression and anxiety scores emerged, but younger individuals and females experienced more severe symptoms. Anger symptoms decreased in young adults, whereas they increased in older adults. Moreover, individuals reported more cognitive failures at follow-up. No changes were observed in resilience, whereas participants reported adopting fewer coping strategies at follow-up. Finally, post-traumatic stress symptoms 2 months after the end of the lockdown were associated with more severe psychological symptoms and more fear of getting infected at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that the long-term psychological impact and the cognitive consequences of quarantine differ according to age and gender. The identification of more vulnerable groups allows the implementation of interventions to reduce psychological symptoms and the risk for cognitive impairment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cognition , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Young Adult
8.
Psychogeriatrics ; 21(4): 540-551, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218175

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The elderly are more vulnerable to COVID-19 and therefore need to adopt long-term social distancing measures. The duration of quarantine impacts the psychological status of the general population. However, until now no study has explored the psychological impact of the pandemic and quarantine together with longitudinal changes in the mental health status of Italian elderly. METHODS: An online questionnaire including an assessment of depression, anxiety, anger, post-traumatic stress, subjective cognitive failures, resilience, coping style, and other dimensions related to the pandemic was completed by participants during (T0) and two months after the end (T1) of the quarantine. RESULTS: The sample recruited at T0 included 334 elderly participants. About 45% of the participants experienced depression, anxiety, or anger. Moreover, more fear of getting infected was related to more severe depression, anxiety, and anger, but resilience was found to mediate these relationships. More severe depressive and anger symptoms were related to more severe cognitive failures. No significant difference was observed in mental health scores between T0 and T1. Finally, more severe depression at T0 was associated with the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms at T1. CONCLUSIONS: The fear of getting infected, probably due to perceived vulnerability to disease, seems to play a crucial role in the development of psychological symptoms in the elderly, but resilience seems to mediate the impact of fear. The presence of long-term psychological consequences and the possible risk of developing PTS symptoms in the elderly suggest the need for targeted interventions to reduce possible long-term psychological and cognitive consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Aged , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Neurol Sci ; 42(7): 2625-2635, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206885

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The quarantine/self-isolation measures implemented to retard the spread of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) may negatively affect the mental health of the population. The present study aimed to explore the impact of the psychological symptoms on the occurrence of cognitive failures in a large sample of home-dwelling Italian individuals during quarantine/self-isolation for COVID-19. METHODS: We employed an online questionnaire using a virtual platform of Google Moduli. The questionnaire included an assessment of cognitive failures evaluated by the Perceived Memory and Attentional Failures Questionnaire (PerMAFaQ) and of resilience, coping style, depression, anger, and anxiety. RESULTS: The online questionnaire was completed by 4175 participants revealing that about 30% of participants complained of cognitive failures at least sometimes during quarantine/self-isolation, whereas some respondents reported very frequent cognitive failures. Moreover, resilience was found to mediate the relationships between depressive and anger symptoms and cognitive failures. Although no difference was found on PerMAFaQ among smart-workers, non-smart-workers, and those currently not at work, people not working at the moment complained of more frequent cognitive failures. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate the need to implement psychological support intervention, particularly for vulnerable groups, to reduce anxiety, depression, and anger, and of psychoeducational interventions to enhance resilience reducing possible long-term cognitive consequences of the quarantine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 29(1): 27-34, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Caregivers of people with dementia (pwD) are at risk of depression, anxiety, and burden. COVID-19 pandemic and government-imposed lockdown as a preventive measure might increase psychological symptoms in caregivers. The authors performed a study to measure the change of psychological symptoms during quarantine or self-isolation for COVID-19 in a sample of Italian caregivers of pwD, and to investigate if the resilience is associated with psychological changes in the sample. METHODS: Eighty-four caregivers of pwD completed an online survey including questionnaires assessing depressive symptomatology and anxiety before and during the lockdown, caregiver burden and levels of resilience. RESULTS: The multivariate analysis of variance revealed an effect of time (before and during the lockdown) in the whole group on depression scores; a significant interaction between time and resilience was found on anxiety scores, revealing that caregivers with high resilience showed a more significant increase of anxiety levels during lockdown than caregivers with low resilience. Moreover, the regression analysis revealed that caregiver burden was associated negatively with resilience scores, and positively with higher functional dependence. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown produced psychological consequences in caregivers of pwD, with an increase of levels of depression. Moreover, high resilience had a negative effect on anxiety levels and no effect on depressive symptomatology during the lockdown; moreover, it was associated with lower levels of caregiver burden. All caregivers, even those with high resilience levels, should be addressed to psychological interventions to reduce levels of depression, anxiety and caregiver burden.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caregivers/psychology , Cost of Illness , Dementia/nursing , Depression/psychology , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Time Factors
11.
J Neurol ; 268(3): 743-750, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety, depression and reduction of quality of life (QoL) are common in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Fear of getting sick from COVID-19, government's lockdown and the imposed social distancing might have had an impact on psychological distress and QoL. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to investigate anxiety, depression and QoL changes in pwMS during SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and lockdown in Italy. METHODS: 67 pwMS with a previous (less than 6 months) neuropsychological evaluation before SARS-CoV-2 outbreak (T0) were re-evaluated at the time of the outbreak and lockdown in Italy (T1). They underwent a clinical and neurological evaluation and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1), the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MsQoL-54) at T0 and T1. Benjamini-Hochberg procedure was applied to control the false discovery rate. RESULTS: BDI-II and STAI-Y1 scores did not change between T0 and T1. At T1, MsQoL-54 scores were higher on the satisfaction with sexual life and the social function subscales, and lower on the limitation due to emotional problems subscale. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that evaluated mood and QoL levels before and during the lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic in pwMS. No worsening of anxiety and depression levels was found. Contrariwise some improvements were noted on QoL, the most reliable regarding the sexual satisfaction and the social function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Satisfaction , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quality of Life , Quarantine/psychology , Sexuality , Social Behavior
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL