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1.
Braz J Infect Dis ; 25(4): 101608, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788010

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People living with HIV (PLH) under combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). OBJECTIVE: We examined the incidence of T2DM, associated factors and mean time to outcome in PLH under cART. METHOD: Data for this multicenter cohort study were obtained from PLH aged over 18, who started cART in 13 Brazilian sites from 2003 to 2013. Factors associated with incident T2DM were evaluated by Cox multiple regression models. RESULTS: A total of 6724 patients (30,997.93 person-years) were followed from January 2003 to December 2016. A T2DM incidence rate of 17.3/1000 person-years (95%CI 15.8-18.8) was observed. Incidence of isolated hypertriglyceridemia and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were 84.3 (95%CI 81.1-87.6) and 14.5/1000 person-years (95%CI 13.2-15.9), respectively. Mean time to T2DM onset was 10.5 years (95%CI 10.3-10.6). Variables associated with incident T2DM were age 40-50 [Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.7, 95%CI 1.4-2.1] and ≥ 50 years (HR 2.4, 95%CI 1.9-3.1); obesity (HR 2.1, 95%CI 1.6-2.8); abnormal triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio (HR 1.8, 95%CI 1.51-2.2). IFG predicted T2DM (HR 2.6, 95%CI 1.7-2.5) and occurred on average 3.3 years before diabetes onset. Exposure to stavudine for ≥ 2 years was independently associated with incident T2DM [HR 1.6, 95%CI 1.0-2.2). CONCLUSION: Brazilian PLH under cART are at significant risk of developing T2DM and share risk factors for diabetes onset with the general population, such as older age, obesity, and having metabolic abnormalities at baseline. Moreover, stavudine use was independently associated with incident T2DM. Identifying PLH at a higher risk of T2DM can help caretakers trigger health promotion and establish specific targets for implementation of preventive measures.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , Risk Factors
2.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 8: 787761, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603363

ABSTRACT

Efforts in the fight against COVID-19 are achieving success in many parts of the world, although progress remains slow in other regions. We believe that a syndemic approach needs to be adopted to address this pandemic given the strong apparent interplay between COVID-19, its related complications, and the socio-structural environment. We have assembled an international, multidisciplinary group of researchers and clinical practitioners to promote a novel syndemic approach to COVID-19: the CArdiometabolic Panel of International experts on Syndemic COvid-19 (CAPISCO). This geographically diverse group aims to facilitate collaborative-networking and scientific exchanges between researchers and clinicians facing a multitude of challenges on different continents during the pandemic. In the present article we present our "manifesto", with the intent to provide evidence-based guidance to the global medical and scientific community for better management of patients both during and after the current pandemic.

3.
Cardiol Ther ; 11(1): 1-7, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520518

ABSTRACT

A recent meta-analysis of over 20,000 individuals showed that hospitalized COVID-19 patients with acute myocardial injury had more than fourfold higher mortality than those without such injury. Since the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates already existing health inequalities, there is an urgent need to create measures to protect the most vulnerable patient groups, including those with a pre-existing increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). A typical example is familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a common genetic disease affecting over 30 million individuals worldwide. If left untreated or undertreated, FH patients suffer from complications of premature ASCVD, such as acute coronary syndromes, resulting in acute myocardial injury/infarction. A recent population-based analysis provided strong evidence suggesting that COVID-19 poses an even higher risk for myocardial injury in FH patients. From the long-term preventive point of view, it is important to note that, in addition to the acutely elevated risk of myocardial injury, an elevated risk of ASCVD and its complications will persist after COVID-19. The decline in outpatient preventive care during the pandemic is likely to influence ASCVD risk and outcomes, particularly in high-risk patients, such as those with FH. This commentary aims to raise global awareness of the challenges that clinicians treating FH patients continue to face during the COVID-19 pandemic, with two low- to middle-income countries, South Africa and Brazil, serving as examples.

4.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 66, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497690

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a continuous and robust impact on world health. The resulting COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating physical, mental and fiscal impact on the millions of people living with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). In addition to older age, people living with CVD, stroke, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension are at a particularly greater risk for severe forms of COVID-19 and its consequences. Meta-analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and thrombotic complications have been observed as both the most prevalent and most dangerous co-morbidities in COVID-19 patients. And despite the nearly incalculable physical, mental, emotional, and economic toll of this pandemic, forthcoming public health figures continue to place cardiovascular disease as the number one cause of death across the globe in the year 2020. The world simply cannot wait for the next pandemic to invest in NCDs. Social determinants of health cannot be addressed only through the healthcare system, but a more holistic multisectoral approach with at its basis the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is needed to truly address social and economic inequalities and build more resilient systems. Yet there is reason for hope: the 2019 UN Political Declaration on UHC provides a strong framework for building more resilient health systems, with explicit calls for investment in NCDs and references to fiscal policies that put such investment firmly within reach. By further cementing the importance of addressing circulatory health in a future Framework Convention on Emergency Preparedness, WHO Member States can take concrete steps towards a pandemic-free future. As the chief representatives of the global circulatory health community and patients, the Global Coalition for Circulatory Health calls for increased support for the healthcare workforce, global vaccine equity, embracing new models of care and digital health solutions, as well as fiscal policies on unhealthy commodities to support these investments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Aged , Global Health , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Atheroscler Plus ; 43: 3-6, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347497

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection continues to cause increased morbidity and mortality, and due to the slow pace of vaccination COVID-19 will probably remain a global burden to health systems for a long time. Unfortunately, the necessary prevention and treatment strategies of COVID-19 have led to restriction measures that are hampering the routine care of common chronic metabolic conditions like hypercholesterolemia. It is of particular concern that during the acute phase of COVID-19, the control of pre-existing metabolic diseases tends to get worse which again increases the risk for complications and a poor outcome in these patients. A significant contributor to these complications is endothelial dysfunction which is associated with COVID-19. This Commentary will discuss the impact of COVID-19 on endothelial function particularly in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a metabolic inherited disease known to in itself adversely affect endothelial function. There should be no hesitation to continue with statin therapy in severe hypercholesterolemic patients with COVID-19. We argue that in FH patients with COVID-19 the clinicians need even consider intensifying statin therapy as well as the addition of other lipid-lowering agents, such as proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9(PCSK9) inhibitors. In contrast to statins, the PCSK9 inhibitors lower lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] level, and, accordingly, these latter drugs need to be considered particularly in FH patients with an elevated level of Lp(a). This call applies to the in-hospital stay and also beyond. When considering that the vasculopathic effects of COVID-19 may persist, a long-term follow-up of individualized therapies in FH patients is warranted.

6.
Clinics ; 76: e2518, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1159487

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) showed increased morbidity and mortality rates and worse prognosis in individuals with underlying chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. There is also evidence of possible links among COVID-19, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Emerging evidence suggests a pro-inflammatory milieu and hypercoagulable state in patients with this infection. Despite anticoagulation, a large proportion of patients requiring intensive care may develop life-threatening thrombotic complications. Indeed, the levels of some markers of hemostatic activation, such as D-dimer, are commonly elevated in COVID-19, indicating potential risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism. In this review, we critically examine and discuss aspects of hypercoagulability and inflammation in COVID-19 and the possible benefits of statins in this scenario, with emphasis on their underlying molecular mechanisms. Moreover, we present recommendations on the use of antiviral drugs in combination with statins.


Subject(s)
Humans , Thrombosis , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Inflammation/drug therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects
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