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1.
Revista Alergia Mexico ; 69(1):61-64, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1969987

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess cutaneous reactions after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine administration. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in health workers belonging to the city of Guayaquil-Ecuador, from March to May 2021. The participants were contacted through a local registry established by the Universidad Espíritu Santo. Frequencies and percentages were used to represent the proportions of nominal variables, while the mean and standard deviation were used for continuous data, given a normal sample distribution. Results: Local skin reactions were the most frequent, and included redness, edema, and itching. On the other hand, delayed large local skin reactions (generalized rash and pruritus, angioedema, urticaria, eczema, petechiae) were rare and occurred in less than 1.4% of participants, (95% CI = 0.69-1.00). Finally, we did not find cases of anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions requiring urgent attention after vaccination. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that local skin reactions occur in a minority of recipients and are often mild and self-limited.

2.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(3):7-11, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1791226

ABSTRACT

Aim: To review neurological aspects of patients infected with COVID-19 including neurological dysfunctions and possible pathophysiology. Methods: A systematic review of articlesfrom PubMed, Ovid MEDLIN, DOAJ databases and grey literature included the WHO-COVID-19 database, and medRxiv.Articles published from January 2020 until June 2020 were included in the review. Out of the226 titles and s, 213 were identified after the removing duplicates. With a screening of 119 studies carried by all authors, 83 full-text articles were assessed based on inclusion criteria of the neurological perspectives with COVID-19. Subsequently, 45 texts were removed. A total of 38 studies were included in the last scrutiny.Specifically, case reports, cohort studies, and case series were included Results: Reviewed evidence was presented in textual and tabulated format, which includes methodology, characteristics of included studies and summary of findings. Correlational evidence of COVID-19 disease and neurological dysfunctions with possible pathophysiology isreviewed. Conclusion:The findings provide evidence for physicians and neurologists working with COVID-19 patients about the possible probable complications and clinical presentations due to the SARS-CoV-2 infection.

3.
Asean Journal of Psychiatry ; 22(6):9, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1431614

ABSTRACT

As of August 9, 2021, there have been around 203 million confirmed cases of coronavirus disease (2019) COVID-19, including 4.3 million deaths. Adverse psychological effects are expected to be long-lasting in vulnerable groups, especially among frontline healthcare workers, given the magnitude of the crisis. Observing strict quarantine and social distancing measures, while being an important strategy to curb the spread, have also led to a significant negative impact on mental health indicators;the long-term consequences are yet to be assessed on a global scale. A medical crisis may become a mental health crisis and the updated findings are reviewed in this paper to provide an updated brief for immunological, occupational, socioeconomic, racial/ethnic, psychological predictors while commenting on care recommendations to prevent psychological trauma from progressing to PTSD.

4.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International ; 32(47):49-61, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1168143

ABSTRACT

Background: An unprecedented global effort in identifying potentially viable and emerging drugs for effective treatment of the novel coronavirus disease (2019) is being made. Of the most promising candidate therapies, convalescent plasma (CP), albeit controversial, is approved for emergency use authorization (EUA) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The concept rests on passive immunity, achieved by administering plasma with high titers of neutralizing antibodies to reduce severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality. The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical improvement, patients' discharge status and all-cause mortality in convalescent plasma versus standard of care COVID-19 patient groups. Methods: Using PRISMA guidelines, a review was conducted from January, 2020, until October, 2020 employing keywords including "convalescent plasma", "clinical improvement, "mortality", "adverse events", "viral load", "dosing", and survival." Dichotomous data for all-cause mortality, patients' discharge status, and clinical improvement at day 14 of treatment were meta-analyzed applying the Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) random effects model using Review Manager 5.4. Results: A total of 627 (23.9%) patients in the CP group and 1997 (76.1%) patients in the control group were pooled. The studies were conducted in the United States, China, Netherlands, and Iran. The CP group had a lower association to all-cause mortality as compared to the control group [OR: 0.69;CI: 0.50 to 0.96;P=0.03]. Patients who received CP had higher probability of discharge during the study course [OR: 1.87;CI: 1.1 to 3.18;P=0.02]. Bias was expected in the analysis due to the stratified of study designs included. Conclusion: Convalescent plasma therapy may be an effective and vital tool with promising historical, current, and expected clinical trial evidence of metrics such as increased safety and reduction of all-cause mortality.

5.
Astim Allerji Immunoloji ; 18(3):148-155, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1031193

ABSTRACT

Objective: The outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID-19) emerged in 2019, and ultimately spread worldwide, being defined as a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. The respiratory disease related to COVID-19 can range from being asymptomatic to presenting as devastating ARDS and death. The elderly and individuals with comorbidities and immunocompromised states are at a higher risk. Asthma is an inflammatory spasm of the airways with ACE2 overexpression at the alveolar level. ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression mediate SARS-CoV-2 infection of host lung cells and hence might increase disease susceptibility in asthmatics. Materials and Methods: A literature review was done by searching the databases of Pubmed, WHO, clinicaltrials.gov, and Google Scholar, using the keywords of -COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, asthma, and their combinations, following the timeline of December 2019 to August 10, 2020. We included patients with asthma diagnosed with COVID-19 while excluding non-COVID-19 patients, pregnant patients, and patients with other diseases or comorbidities. Primary outcomes included mortality and ICU admissions of both groups. Based on the available data, we conducted a meta-analysis via RevMan 5.4 using a random-effects model and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Patients with and without asthma were compared for risk outcomes of mortality. For the 755 COVID-19 patients with asthma and 4969 non-asthmatic COVID-19 patients, we found that the risk of mortality would increase by 9% in the asthmatic group (RR=1.09, CI= 0.58 to 2.03, I2=72%). There was an increased proportion of ICU admissions among the asthmatic group (RR=1.39, CI = 0.80 to 2.42). There was high heterogeneity among the studies (I-2 = 79%). Medications such as corticosteroids improve the mortality and ICU admission rates. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the number of COVID-19 cases in patients with asthma has been lower than those of the nonasthmatic group. COVID-19 patients with asthma were at increased risk of mortality and ICU admission due to underlying factors or predisposition. Finally, corticosteroids are considered safe and may confer protection against the severity of COVID-19 infection.

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