Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Cell ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031185

ABSTRACT

After the global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.2, some BA.2 subvariants, including BA.2.9.1, BA.2.11, BA.2.12.1, BA.4 and BA.5, emerged in multiple countries. Our statistical analysis showed that the effective reproduction numbers of these BA.2 subvariants are greater than that of the original BA.2. Neutralization experiments revealed that the immunity induced by BA.1/2 infections is less effective against BA.4/5. Cell culture experiments showed that BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/5 replicate more efficiently in human alveolar epithelial cells than BA.2, and particularly, BA.4/5 is more fusogenic than BA.2. We further provided the structure of BA.4/5 spike receptor-binding domain that binds to human ACE2 and considered how the substitutions in BA.4/5 spike play roles in ACE2 binding and immune evasion. Moreover, experiments using hamsters suggested that BA.4/5 is more pathogenic than BA.2. Our multiscale investigations suggest that the risk of BA.2 subvariants, particularly BA.4/5, to global health is greater than that of original BA.2.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-337677

ABSTRACT

After the global spread of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.2 lineage, some BA.2-related variants that acquire mutations in the L452 residue of spike protein, such as BA.2.9.1 and BA.2.13 (L452M), BA.2.12.1 (L452Q), and BA.2.11, BA.4 and BA.5 (L452R), emerged in multiple countries. Our statistical analysis showed that the effective reproduction numbers of these L452R/M/Q-bearing BA.2-related Omicron variants are greater than that of the original BA.2. Neutralization experiments revealed that the immunity induced by BA.1 and BA.2 infections is less effective against BA.4/5. Cell culture experiments showed that BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/5 replicate more efficiently in human alveolar epithelial cells than BA.2, and particularly, BA.4/5 is more fusogenic than BA.2. Furthermore, infection experiments using hamsters indicated that BA.4/5 is more pathogenic than BA.2. Altogether, our multiscale investigations suggest that the risk of L452R/M/Q-bearing BA.2-related Omicron variants, particularly BA.4 and BA.5, to global health is potentially greater than that of original BA.2. Highlights Spike L452R/Q/M mutations increase the effective reproduction number of BA.2 BA.4/5 is resistant to the immunity induced by BA.1 and BA.2 infections BA.2.12.1 and BA.4/5 more efficiently spread in human lung cells than BA.2 BA.4/5 is more pathogenic than BA.2 in hamsters

3.
MAbs ; 14(1): 2072455, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1839974

ABSTRACT

Many potent neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies have been developed and used for therapies. However, the effectiveness of many antibodies has been reduced against recently emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, especially the Omicron variant. We identified a highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody, UT28K, in COVID-19 convalescent individuals who recovered from a severe condition. UT28K showed efficacy in neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in an in vitro assay and in vivo prophylactic treatment, and the reactivity to the Omicron strain was reduced. The structural analyses revealed that antibody UT28K Fab and SARS-CoV-2 RBD protein interactions were mainly chain-dominated antigen-antibody interactions. In addition, a mutation analysis suggested that the emergence of a UT28K neutralization-resistant SARS-CoV-2 variant was unlikely, as this variant would likely lose its competitive advantage over circulating SARS-CoV-2. Our data suggest that UT28K offers potent protection against SARS-CoV-2, including newly emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans
4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318387

ABSTRACT

Potently neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies often target the receptor binding site (RBS) of spike protein but the variability of RBS epitopes hampers broad neutralization of different clades of coronaviruses and emerging drifted viruses. Here, we identified a human RBS antibody that potently neutralizes SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 variants that belong to clade 1 SARS-related coronavirus. X-ray crystallography revealed coordinated recognition by the heavy chain to conserved sites and the light chain to RBS, allowing for the mimicry of ACE2 binding mode. The minimum footprints in the hypervariable region of RBS contributed to the breadth of neutralization, and the activity was further enhanced by IgG3 switching. Eventually, the coordinated binding resulted in broad neutralization of SARS-CoV and emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. Furthermore, therapeutic treatment in a hamster model provided protection at low dosage. The structural basis for broadly neutralizing activity informs the design of broad spectrum of therapeutics and vaccines.Funding: This work was supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development grant JP19fk0108111 (TH, YT), JP20fk0108298 (TK, TH, KM, YT), JP20am0101093 (KM), JP20ae0101047 (KM), JP20fk0108251 (HS), and JP20am0101124 (YK), by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology grant JPMXS0420100119 (KM) and 20H05773 (TH), by The Naito Foundation (TH), and by Joint Usage/Research Center program of Institute for Frontier Life and Medical Sciences, Kyoto University (KM).Conflict of Interest: AS is an employee of Shionogi & Co., Ltd. MO is a CEO, employee, and shareholder of Trans Chromosomics, Inc. These authors acknowledge a potential conflict of interest and attest that the work contained in this report is free of any bias that might be associated with the commercial goals of the company. TO, YA, MO, TH, KM, and YT declare that an intellectual property application has been filed using the data presented in this paper. The other authors declare that they have no competing interests.Ethical Approval: Animal procedures were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee of the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan, and performed in accordance with the guidelines of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. In vitro escape mutation screening experiments for SARSCoV-2 were performed at the Biosafety Level-3 facility of the Research Center for ZoonosisControl, Hokkaido University, and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases following the institutional guidelines.

5.
Immunity ; 54(10): 2385-2398.e10, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370548

ABSTRACT

Potent neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies often target the spike protein receptor-binding site (RBS), but the variability of RBS epitopes hampers broad neutralization of multiple sarbecoviruses and drifted viruses. Here, using humanized mice, we identified an RBS antibody with a germline VH gene that potently neutralized SARS-related coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 variants. X-ray crystallography revealed coordinated recognition by the heavy chain of non-RBS conserved sites and the light chain of RBS with a binding angle mimicking the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. The minimum footprints in the hypervariable region of RBS contributed to the breadth of neutralization, which was enhanced by immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) class switching. The coordinated binding resulted in broad neutralization of SARS-CoV and emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. Low-dose therapeutic antibody treatment in hamsters reduced the virus titers and morbidity during SARS-CoV-2 challenge. The structural basis for broad neutralizing activity may inform the design of a broad spectrum of therapeutics and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Binding Sites, Antibody , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/chemistry , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cricetinae , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/chemistry , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/metabolism , Immunoglobulin G/chemistry , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Mice , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
6.
Cell Rep ; 36(2): 109385, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283972

ABSTRACT

Administration of convalescent plasma or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a potent therapeutic option for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. However, SARS-CoV-2 variants with mutations in the spike protein have emerged in many countries. To evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies induced in convalescent patients against emerging variants, we isolate anti-spike mAbs from two convalescent COVID-19 patients infected with prototypic SARS-CoV-2 by single-cell sorting of immunoglobulin-G-positive (IgG+) memory B cells. Anti-spike antibody induction is robust in these patients, and five mAbs have potent neutralizing activities. The efficacy of most neutralizing mAbs and convalescent plasma samples is maintained against B.1.1.7 and mink cluster 5 variants but is significantly decreased against variants B.1.351 from South Africa and P.1 from Brazil. However, mAbs with a high affinity for the receptor-binding domain remain effective against these neutralization-resistant variants. Rapid spread of these variants significantly impacts antibody-based therapies and vaccine strategies against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Male , Mutation , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL