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1.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; : 15423050221146510, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2195310

ABSTRACT

This mixed-methods pilot study explored the psychological and emotional experiences of chaplains and the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of workshops designed to support chaplain well-being. After the workshops, scores on a measure of self-compassion increased, while secondary traumatic stress and burnout scores decreased. Qualitative data reflected the range of experiences of chaplaincy as well as the benefits of the workshops. This pilot study supports further exploration of organizational interventions to promote chaplain well-being.

2.
Taxation in the Digital Economy: New Models in Asia and the Pacific ; : 166-190, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2202326

ABSTRACT

This chapter presents an in-depth exploratory case study of the "digital journeys” of Australia and New Zealand to explore how digitalization is shaping revenue administrations. The study applies a tax policy lens and largely positivist approach, with some normative suggestions. While there is no specific theoretical framework, the study observes how institutional factors influence the ability of the state to create productive political relationships with key groups. The digital journeys of both administrations over the last three decades include some common features and challenges. The question "Have they done enough, fast enough, to be ready for the challenges of the 21st-century digital economy?” is explored by charting the development of digital services in the two countries, the role of smart data exploitation, the emergence of new policies and powers, and both administrations' readiness to support their governments in responding to the coronavirus disease pandemic. Finally, the "new normal” for these administrations is discussed and some recommendations offered. © 2023 selection and editorial matter, Asian Development Bank Institute;individual chapters, the contributors

3.
Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Management ; : 223-239, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2157960

ABSTRACT

New Zealand has a reputation for being a nation reliant on the economic contributions of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as renowned for its creativity and use of its geographical advantage. This positive image needs to be tempered by the country's failure to reach its full potential through embracing widespread entrepreneurship. Much of this suboptimal achievement can be attributed to the below OECD-average investment in research and development (R&D) activities and a fledgling venture capital (VC) market. Fiscal investment by the public and private sectors has been low, notwithstanding an increasingly number of government initiatives. The lack of certainty for businesses has been exacerbated by politics, evidenced by numerous changes to R&D-related legislation. The evidence until early 2020 indicated steady improvement in investment until the untimely impact of COVID-19. As of late 2021, the level of investment is mixed in part reflecting the impact of COVID-19. This chapter seeks to provide an overview of New Zealand's (NZ's) efforts to encourage entrepreneurship through incentivising R&D activities and other fiscal-related measures. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

4.
Frontiers in Environmental Science ; 10:10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1887096

ABSTRACT

Online modes of teaching and learning have gained increased attention following the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in education delivery trends likely to continue for the foreseeable future. It is therefore critical to understand the implications for student learning outcomes and their interest in or affinity towards the subject, particularly in water science classes, where educators have traditionally employed hands-on outdoor activities that are difficult to replicate online. In this study, we share our experiences adapting a field-based laboratory activity on groundwater to accommodate more than 700 students in our largest-enrollment general education course during the pandemic. As part of our adaptation strategy, we offered two versions of the same exercise, one in-person at the Mirror Lake Water Science Learning Laboratory, located on Ohio State University's main campus, and one online. Although outdoor lab facilities have been used by universities since at least the 1970s, this research is novel in that 1) it considers not only student achievement but also affinity for the subject, 2) it is the first of its kind on The Ohio State University's main campus, and 3) it was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, at a time when most university classes were unable to take traditional field trips. We used laboratory grades and a survey to assess differences in student learning and affinity outcomes for in-person and online exercises. Students who completed the in-person exercise earned better scores than their online peers. For example, in Fall 2021, the median lab score for the in-person group was 97.8%, compared to 91.7% for the online group. The in-person group also reported a significant (p < 0.05) increase in how much they enjoyed learning about water, while online students reported a significant decrease. Online students also reported a significant decrease in how likely they would be to take another class in water or earth sciences. It is unclear whether the in-person exercise had better learning and affinity outcomes because of the hands-on, outdoor qualities of the lab or because the format allowed greater interaction among peers and teaching instructors (TAs). To mitigate disparities in student learning outcomes between the online and in-person course delivery, instructors will implement future changes to the online version of the lab to enhance interactions among students and TAs.

5.
Frontiers in Education ; 6:17, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1359185

ABSTRACT

In training to become a registered psychologist in Australia, as with many other countries, there is a requirement for students to attend placements, where they work with clients in an apprenticeship model under the guidance of qualified supervisors. In the context of COVID-19, tertiary sector psychology educators responsible for facilitating these placements, which typically require face-to-face client work, have been challenged to arrange or maintain practica. During the pandemic, across Australia, most placements have been affected through cancellation, postponement, or modification (e.g., using telehealth, supported by the Australian Federal Government). In this paper we describe a collaborative initiative by members of the psychology profession across 15 providers of Australian postgraduate professional training programs. The initiative aimed to identify ways in which to develop and innovate psychological placement offerings, specifically using simulation-based learning. Although simulation-based learning in psychology training programs in Australia is a widely employed pedagogy for the scaffolding of theory into psychological practice, there is paucity of clear and comprehensive guidelines for the use of simulation to both optimize competency-based training and ensure public and student safety. The overarching aim of the group, and the focus of this paper, is to provide standardized guidelines for the inclusion of simulation-based learning in psychology training in Australia both during and post-COVID 19. Such guidelines may be equally valuable for psychology training programs globally.

6.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):54, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238401

ABSTRACT

Aims: The main role of Community Champions is to educate and raise awareness of diabetes and Diabetes UK by organising stalls, talks, presentations and healthy living days at community centres, health fairs and local festivals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the delivery and outcomes of a regional implementation of the Diabetes UK Community Champions project, focusing on Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME), Gypsy Roma Travellers, and student populations, in the Surrey health region. Methods: A mixed-methods evaluation approach was adopted, incorporating routinely collected data and interviews with champions and stakeholders. Results and conclusions: The number of Community Champions recruited (n = 27) exceeded target (n = 20). Champions were very satisfied with their training. Champions raised awareness through organised events and informally through conversations with members of their family and community However, covid-19 put a halt to all in-person awareness raising events. Overall, the Diabetes UK Community Champions project was successfully implemented in the Surrey Heartlands area. Some weaknesses of the project included its scale and extent of monitoring;namely, behaviour change or clinical data could not be recorded. However, interview data suggested that Champions themselves made a range of lifestyle changes. Although no members of the Gypsy Roma Traveller community were recruited as champions, significant engagement had been made with the community. Interview data suggested a lack of confidence in organising events without the help of the coordinating project manager. To address this, training and ongoing support for Champions should be extended.

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