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1.
Indian Journal of Community Health ; 34(4):516-520, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2326343

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccines are considered as the one of the main pillars in halting and ending the presently on-going coronavirus disease (COVID-19 disease) pandemic which has spread globally since it was first detected in Wuhan, China in December 2019. In the absence of specific therapy, infection prevention practices and mass vaccination remains the mainstay in controlling the disease. Objectives: Objective of the study was to assess COVID-19 vaccination status, socio-demographic and clinical profile among healthcare workers diagnosed with COVID-19. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey from 1st March 2021 to 30th June 2021 among healthcare workers who were diagnosed with COVID-19 in a tertiary care institute of Uttarakhand, India was conducted, and universal sampling was used. Institutional Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: Total 662 healthcare workers were diagnosed with COVID-19. 429 (64.8%) of these COVID-19 diagnosed healthcare workers had received either single (129,30%) or both dose (300,70%) of COVID-19 vaccine while remaining 233 (35.2%) belonged to non-vaccinated group. History of exposure to COVID-19 positive patients was higher in vaccinated (66.4%) than in non-vaccinated group (55%) (p = 0.004). Hospitalisation was found to be higher among non-vaccinated (5.6%) than vaccinated group (2.3%) (p = 0.029). Conclusions: This study concludes that being vaccinated against COVID-19 disease provides protection against severe infection and reduces the need for hospitalization.

2.
Indian Tourism: Diaspora Perspectives ; : 143-156, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2303185

ABSTRACT

This chapter challenges the urban bias in studies on the middle class in India and underlines the need to focus on the significant role rural middle class plays in economic diversification. Given that more than 23% of the upper middle class are located in rural India, it is surprising to note that their contribution in supporting experience economy remains under-researched. Thus, this chapter fills a key gap in existing studies on rural tourism in India by underlining how rural middle-class has triggered a huge demand for travel within the country itself for rural cultural programmes and different schemes to promote rural heritage sights. © 2022 Gunjan Saxena.

3.
Current Traditional Medicine ; 9(4):1-8, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2281647

ABSTRACT

With the global death toll nearing 3.3 million, India being amongst the top 4 countries, the condition is more than fearsome. World Health Organization (WHO) recommends one doctor per 1000 population ratio, but India lags it by one doctor to 1456 people, which sets a lot of pressure on the healthcare system. Traditional remedies are becoming increasingly popular in India as a re-sult of the lack of a proper medical system. Due to the rich diversity of medicinal herbs and drugs, India has been managing health issues with its 5000 years old medication system. Amidst all this, the traditional medicine system has given relief to plenty of diseases and remains the primary de-fence system against COVID-19. Therefore, COVID-19 is also managed by its different medicinal systems, which are collectively known as the AYUSH regime. It had been a recognized system to tackle diseases in the past. In this mini-review, we performed a deep study of the Indian traditional medicine system in managing the COVID-19 situation.Copyright © 2023 Bentham Science Publishers.

4.
European Journal of Marketing ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2063159

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to conceptualise the panic buying behaviour of consumers in the UK during the novel COVID-19 crisis, using the assemblage approach as it is non-deterministic and relational and affords new ways of understanding the phenomenon. Design/methodology/approach: The study undertakes a digital ethnography approach and content analysis of Twitter data. A total of 6,803 valid tweets were collected over the period when panic buying was at its peak at the beginning of the first lockdown in March 2020. Findings: The panic buying phase was a radical departure from the existing linguistic, discursive, symbolic and semiotic structures that define routine consumer behaviour. The authors suggest that the panic buying behaviour is best understood as a constant state of becoming, whereby stockpiling, food waste and a surge in cooking at home emerged as significant contributors to positive consumer sentiments. Research limitations/implications: The authors offer unique insights into the phenomenon of panic buying by considering DeLanda’s assemblage theory. This work will inform future research associated with new social meanings of products, particularly those that may have been (re)shaped during the COVID-19 crisis. Practical implications: The study offers insights for practitioners and retailers to lessen the intensity of consumers’ panic buying behaviour in anticipation of a crisis and for successful crisis management. Originality/value: Panic buying took on a somewhat carnivalesque hue as consumers transitioned to what we consider to be atypical modes of purchasing that remain under-theorised in marketing. Using the conceptual lenses of assemblage, the authors map bifurcations that the panic buyers’ assemblages articulated via material and immaterial bodies. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

5.
Annals of International Medical and Dental Research ; 6(6), 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1006155

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to assess the level of worry, psychological distress, perception regarding quality of information, and influence of these factors on the behaviour of Healthcare professionals (HCPs) during Covid-19 pandemic outbreak in India.

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