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1.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2020 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The outbreak of COVID-19 posed the issue of urgently identifying treatment strategies. Colchicine was considered for this purpose based on well-recognised anti-inflammatory effects and potential antiviral properties. In the present study, colchicine was proposed to patients with COVID-19, and its effects compared with 'standard-of-care' (SoC). METHODS: In the public hospital of Esine, northern Italy, 140 consecutive inpatients, with virologically and radiographically confirmed COVID-19 admitted in the period 5-19 March 2020, were treated with 'SoC' (hydroxychloroquine and/or intravenous dexamethasone; and/or lopinavir/ritonavir). They were compared with 122 consecutive inpatients, admitted between 19 March and 5 April 2020, treated with colchicine (1 mg/day) and SoC (antiviral drugs were stopped before colchicine, due to potential interaction). RESULTS: Patients treated with colchicine had a better survival rate as compared with SoC at 21 days of follow-up (84.2% (SE=3.3%) vs 63.6% (SE=4.1%), p=0.001). Cox proportional hazards regression survival analysis showed that a lower risk of death was independently associated with colchicine treatment (HR=0.151 (95% CI 0.062 to 0.368), p<0.0001), whereas older age, worse PaO2/FiO2, and higher serum levels of ferritin at entry were associated with a higher risk. CONCLUSION: This proof-of-concept study may support the rationale of use of colchicine for the treatment of COVID-19. Efficacy and safety must be determined in controlled clinical trials.

3.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 21(9): 625-629, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641621

ABSTRACT

: The COVID-19 pandemic is challenging our cardiovascular care of patients with heart diseases. In the setting of pericardial diseases, there are two possible different scenarios to consider: the patient being treated for pericarditis who subsequently becomes infected with SARS-CoV-2, and the patient with COVID-19 who develops pericarditis or pericardial effusion. In both conditions, clinicians may be doubtful regarding the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, colchicine, and biological agents, such as anti-IL1 agents (e.g. anakinra), that are the mainstay of therapy for pericarditis.For NSAIDs, there is no clear scientific evidence linking ibuprofen and other NSAIDs to worsening of COVID-19; however, it seems prudent to continue them, if necessary to control pericarditis, and on the other hand, to prefer paracetamol for fever and systemic symptoms related to COVID-19. Treatments with corticosteroids, colchicine, and anakinra appear well tolerated in the context of COVID-19 infection and are currently actively evaluated as potential therapeutic options for COVID infection at different stages of the disease. On this basis, currently most treatments for pericarditis do not appear contraindicated also in the presence of possible COVID-19 infection and should not be discontinued, and some (corticosteroids, colchicine, and anakinra) can be considered to treat both conditions.

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