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1.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(11)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090393

ABSTRACT

Sports have been majorly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. After the lockdown period, vaccination and protocols were implemented to return to normality. We aimed to assess the attitudes and practices related to COVID-19 vaccination among athletes, and to record adverse effects of vaccination, if any. A questionnaire was distributed to 1012 male and female athletes, 15+ years old, within the region of Athens. Vaccination coverage with at least one dose was 93.5%, whereas 53.9% were fully vaccinated. More than half of the participants were infected with SARS-CoV-2 at the time of the study. More than 90% of the participants, considered the vaccines as safe, effective and important for public health. Concern about potential side-effects was raised especially by women athletes (59.1% of women compared to 42.2% of men, p < 0.001). The main reasons for avoiding vaccination were fear of vaccine safety, concern about the short time period for vaccine development and testing and doubt of risk of being exposed to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The main reported side-effects were pain at the injection site, fatigue, fever and headache. Approximately two thirds of the participants reported that vaccination did not affect their training, and none reported missing participation in scheduled athletic events. Participants reported high compliance to preventive measures by themselves and fellow athletes, but low satisfaction regarding the implementation of public protocols and the flow of information provided by the authorities. Athletes of older age and those less concerned about potential side-effects were more likely to get fully vaccinated. Nevertheless, the vast majority of the athletes in our study were vaccinated for COVID-19 despite any hesitation regarding effectiveness, safety, or potential side-effects from the vaccines.

2.
J Surg Oncol ; 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2034912

ABSTRACT

During first outburst of COVID-19, several strategies had been applied for surgical oncology patients to minimize COVID-19 transmission. COVID-19 infection seemed to compromise survival and major complication rates of surgical oncology patients. However, survival, tumor progression and recurrence rates of surgical oncology patients were associated to the consequences of COVID-19 pandemic on their management. In addition, the severity of COVID-19 infections has been downgraded. Therefore, management of surgical oncology patients should be reconsidered.

3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(5)2022 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928673

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers are at high risk of influenza virus infection as well as of transmitting the infection to vulnerable patients who may be at high risk of severe illness. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence and related factors of influenza vaccination coverage (2020-2021flu season), among members of the Athens Medical Association in Greece. This survey employed secondary analysis data from a questionnaire-based dataset on COVID-19 vaccination coverage and associated factors from surveyed doctors, registered within the largest medical association in Greece. All members were invited to participate in the anonymous online questionnaire-based survey over the period of 25 February to 13 March 2021. Finally, 1993 physicians (60% males; 40% females) participated in the study. Influenza vaccination coverage was estimated at 76%. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that older age (OR = 1.02; 95% C.I. = 1.01-1.03), history of COVID-19 vaccination (OR = 2.71; 95% C.I. = 2.07-3.56) and perception that vaccines in general are safe (OR = 16.49; 95% C.I. = 4.51-60.25) were found to be independently associated factors with the likelihood of influenza vaccination coverage. Public health authorities should maximize efforts and undertake additional actions in order to increase the percentage of physicians/health care workers (HCWs) being immunized against influenza. The current COVID-19 pandemic offers an opportunity to focus on tailored initiatives and interventions aiming to improve the influenza vaccination coverage of HCWs in a spirit of synergy and cooperation.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785688

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on health, economy, society and education. In the effort to return to normalcy, according to the instructions of the Greek Government for the resumption of the operation of schools, a screening Rapid Antigen Detection Test with the method of self-testing is required for students twice per week, for the early identification and isolation of positive cases. We aimed to pivotally investigate the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to self-testing procedures against COVID-19 among Greek students. A questionnaire was distributed to a convenient sample of students in the region of Athens. Information about the vaccination coverage against SARS-CoV-2 was also obtained. Our study included 1000 students, with 70% of them having an average grade at school. Most of the participants were aware of coronavirus (98.6%) and the self-test (95.5%). The vast majority of students (97%) performed self-testing twice per week, with the 70% them being assisted by someone else. Nearly one sixth of the participants had been infected by COVID-19 (14%) while 36% of them have already been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. In conclusion, we report high compliance with the COVID-19 self-testing procedure among students in Attica, Greece. Older age adolescents are more likely to not comply with the regulations of self-testing. Consequently, tailored interventions targeted at older age adolescents are warranted in order to increase the acceptability of self-testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Self-Testing , Students
5.
Surgeon ; 20(5): 275-283, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597846

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing numbers of female medical students, surgery remains male-dominated. PURPOSE: To highlight the principal career obstacles experienced by aspiring female surgeons. METHODS: A narrative review of literature on the position and career barriers of female surgeons has been conducted, using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. MAIN FINDINGS: Implicit and even explicit biases against female surgeons remain prevalent, negatively impacting their training performance and overall professional trajectory. Female surgeons are globally underrepresented in leadership positions and senior academic rankings, especially that of a full professor. They feel hampered by lack of effective mentorship, whose value for a successful career has been acknowledged by all medical students, surgeons and surgical leaders. Their work-life imbalance is sometimes expressed as lower likelihood than their male contemporaries of getting married or having children and may be attributed to their conventional association with the role of caretaker, their personal desire to accommodate occupational and family duties and the inadequate implementation of parental leave and childcare policies. Female surgeons' "infertility" may be further explained by direct and indirect pregnancy-related difficulties. Female surgeons are also financially undercompensated compared to their male contemporaries. Finally, specialty-specific challenges should not be overlooked. CONCLUSIONS: While encouraging steps have been made, women in surgery feel still hindered by various obstacles. The qualitative, interview-based nature of current literature requires more meticulous studies on these barriers with a more quantitative and objective approach. Attenuation of gender imbalance in surgical specialties requires further changes in mentality and more targeted modifications in relevant policies.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Physicians, Women , Specialties, Surgical , Surgeons , Attitude of Health Personnel , Career Choice , Child , Female , General Surgery/education , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Specialties, Surgical/education
8.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1159): 321-327, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158120

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly disrupted the well-established, traditional structure of medical education. Τhe new limitations of physical presence have accelerated the development of an online learning environment, comprising both of asynchronous and synchronous distance education, and the introduction of novel ways of student assessment. At the same time, this prolonged crisis had serious implications on the lives of medical students including their psychological well-being and the impact on their academic trajectories. The new reality has, on many occasions, triggered the 'acting up' of medical students as frontline healthcare staff, which has been perceived by many of them as a positive learning and contributing experience, and has led to a variety of responses from the educational institutions. All things considered, the urgency for rapid and novel adaptations to the new circumstances has functioned as a springboard for remarkable innovations in medical education,including the promotion of a more "evidence-based" approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Exp Ther Med ; 21(3): 244, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073518

ABSTRACT

As one year is approaching since the beginning of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it is important to acknowledge the detrimental effect that it is having on mental health at the individual, societal and public health levels. The current review presents the direct and indirect psychological impact of COVID-19 on the general public, as well as on vulnerable groups, including the elderly, the young, healthcare professionals, people with pre-existing mental health issues, those infected by COVID-19, homeless people and refugees. Important findings are discussed in the present review, including the social stigma in older people associated with portraying COVID-19 as the disease of the elderly, and the limited psychological impact of COVID-19 in the severely mentally ill, alongside the response of the mental healthcare systems globally to this unparalleled public health crisis. The important lessons to be learnt so far can help formulate individual mental health recommendations, as well as improved intervention and prevention public health strategies.

11.
J Gastrointest Cancer ; 52(2): 407-413, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947062

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The safety of upper gastrointestinal cancer patients in the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak is extremely important and most surgeons need to establish a contingency management. AIM: In this study, we present the surgical outlines of patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from PubMed, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, and SCOPUS of reports up to September 2020. RESULTS: The COVID-19 outbreak makes surgical procedures extremely difficult to be performed. The most common criteria to prioritize patients for surgical treatment are stage, tumor biology, presence of tumor-related symptoms, the risk of tumor to become non-resectable, and time interval from neoadjuvant therapy. The multidisciplinary teams can help assigning a priority level to each clinical case. CONCLUSION: We have to continue providing treatment to oncologic patients in the face of COVID-19 uncertainty, with higher caution and responsibility in order to develop a safer and more effective personalized treatment plan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Algorithms , COVID-19/etiology , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/complications , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Risk Factors , Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
13.
Lancet ; 396(10257): 1066, 2020 10 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-845286
15.
Obes Surg ; 30(11): 4428-4436, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ongoing "coronavirus disease 19" (COVID-19) pandemic has had a strong effect on the delivery of surgical care worldwide. Elective surgeries have been canceled or delayed in order to reallocate resources to the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Currently, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on bariatric and metabolic surgical practice remains unclear. METHODS: An internet-based online survey was performed among bariatric surgeons worldwide. The survey was sent to bariatric surgeons via the International Bariatric Club Facebook group and by electronic mail via the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and metabolic disorders (IFSO) secretariat to members of the associated national IFSO societies. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-nine (n = 169) bariatric surgeons participated in the survey. The majority of the respondents postponed preoperative upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopies, appointments in the outpatient clinic and bariatric operations. Most surgeons performed video calls for follow-up appointments instead of meeting the patients in the outpatient clinics. Laparoscopy was still the preferred treatment for surgical emergencies, but a trend towards conservative treatment of acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis was shown. Rapid preoperative COVID-19 testing availability was poor; therefore, routine screening of emergency bariatric cases was not widely provided. A wide variance occurred regarding precautions and personal protection equipment among the participants. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic showed a strong impact on bariatric surgical practice regarding surgical and outpatient planning as well as personnel management. Coordinated effort from the national bariatric societies should focus on strict implementation of the current recommendations regarding precaution measures and personal protection equipment. Further studies should evaluate how this impact will evolve in the near future.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Oncol Lett ; 20(1): 441-447, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626618

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused unprecedented societal turmoil, triggering a rapid, still ongoing, transformation of healthcare provision on a global level. In this new landscape, it is highly important to acknowledge the challenges this pandemic poses on the care of the particularly vulnerable cancer patients and the subsequent psychosocial impact on them. We have outlined our clinical experience in managing patients with gastrointestinal, hematological, gynaecological, dermatological, neurological, thyroid, lung and paediatric cancers in the COVID-19 era and have reviewed the emerging literature around barriers to care of oncology patients and how this crisis affects them. Moreover, evolving treatment strategies and novel ways of addressing the needs of oncology patients in the new context of the pandemic are discussed.

17.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1695-1699, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-539511

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Coronavirus is an ongoing pandemic challenging health systems worldwide. The aim of this report was to evaluate the effectiveness of lockdown in different countries, highlighting the performance of Greek society and authorities. METHODS: We analyzed publicly available data from the "Worldometer". We evaluated the efficacy of lockdown at one month after implementation. Delta Days (DD) referred to the difference in the days of reaching 1 case/million people to the adoption of lockdown. RESULTS: Higher healthcare expenditure as % of the national GDP was not correlated with better 30-day mortality outcomes. DD index was significantly correlated to the incidence of COVID-19 per million people at 30 days (p-value=0.001). The correlation between DD and 30-day mortality was not statistically significant (p-value=0.087). CONCLUSION: Early lockdown was proven to be the appropriate policy to limit the spread of COVID-19. Greece was a success story in preventing spread despite limited resources.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Policy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Global Health , Greece/epidemiology , Health Expenditures/statistics & numerical data , Health Resources/economics , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Program Evaluation , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Resource Allocation
18.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 109946, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459294

ABSTRACT

Geriatric patients seem to be the most vulnerable group in COVID-19. These patients are usually characterized by impaired mobilization and malnutrition. In addition, obesity has been correlated with increased mortality rates after COVID-19 infection, highlighting the role of nutrition in prognosis of COVID-19 as well. In the past, several indices of nutritional status (GNRI) and functional status (ECOG performance status, Barthel Index, Handgrip Strength) have demonstrated a prognostic ability for hospitalized patients with influenza-like respiratory infections from coronavirus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza and rhinovirus. Our hypothesis suggests that the previously mentioned nutritional and functional status indices, combined with the pneumonia severity index (CRB-65), could be useful in prognosis of morbidity and mortality of the elderly after the novel COVID-19 infection. Our hypothesis, is the first in the literature, which suggests a prognostic association between nutritional status of patients and COVID-19 infection, offering a quick and low-cost prognostic tool for COVID-19 in the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Functional Status , Nutritional Status/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Hand Strength/physiology , Humans , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Prognosis , Risk Factors
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