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1.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; : 1945998221075610, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138550

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: (1) Assess overall COVID-19 mortality in ventilated patients with and without tracheostomy. (2) Determine the impact of tracheostomy on mechanical ventilation duration, overall length of stay (LOS), and intensive care unit (ICU) LOS for patients with COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: Case series with planned chart review. SETTING: Single-institution tertiary care center. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 who were ≥18 years old and requiring invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) met inclusion criteria. Patients were stratified into 2 cohorts: IPPV with tracheostomy and IPPV with intubation only. Cohorts were analyzed for the following primary outcome measures: mortality, LOS, ICU LOS, and IPPV duration. RESULTS: An overall 258 patients with IPPV met inclusion criteria: 46 (18%) with tracheostomy and 212 (82%) without (66% male; median age, 63 years [interquartile range, 18.75]). Average LOS, time in ICU, and time receiving IPPV were longer in the tracheostomy cohort (P < .01). Ability to wean from IPPV was similar between cohorts (P > .05). The number of deaths in the nontracheostomy cohort (54%) was significantly higher than the tracheostomy cohort (29%, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: While tracheostomy placement in patients with COVID-19 did not shorten overall LOS, mechanical ventilation duration, or ICU LOS, patients with a tracheostomy experienced a significantly lower number of deaths vs those without. One goal for tracheostomy is improved pulmonary toilet with associated shortened IPPV requirements. Our study did not identify this advantage among the COVID-19 population. However, this study demonstrates that the need for tracheostomy in the COVID-19 setting does not portent a poor prognostic factor, as patients with a tracheostomy experienced a significantly higher survival rate than their nontracheostomy counterparts.

2.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(6): 1137-1139, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044140

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to evolve through the United States and other countries, differing rates of progression and decline are occurring based on varied population densities. While some health systems are reaching a steady state of new patient cases, others are seeing a leveling off or decline, allowing for restoration of normal practices. This "reverse-surge" planning and implementation process is a colossal undertaking for health systems trying to reacquire patient access and financial stability while preserving necessary resources and maintaining precautions for another potential surge. For the otolaryngologist, reverse-surge planning involves additional workflow adjustments in the outpatient and operating room settings given the abundance of COVID-19 virus in the upper aerodigestive tract. As the reverse-surge best practices are still under development, open communication between otolaryngology colleagues and health system leadership is paramount to optimize efficiency and maintain an adequate measure of safety for patients and our health care teams.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Otolaryngology/methods , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Health Personnel , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Otolaryngologists , Personal Protective Equipment , United States
3.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(4): 712-713, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591434

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared coronavirus disease 2019 a global pandemic. In addition to massive social disruption, this pandemic affected the traditional fellowship interview season for otolaryngology subspecialties, including head and neck surgical oncology, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, laryngology, rhinology, neurotology, and pediatric otolaryngology. The impact on the fellowship interview process, from the standpoint of the institution and the applicant, necessitated the use of alternative interview processes. This change may alter the future of how interviews and the match proceed for years to come, with nontraditional methods of interviewing becoming a mainstay. While the impact this pandemic has on the fellowship match process is not yet fully realized, this commentary aims to discuss the challenges faced on both sides of the equation and to offer solutions during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/methods , Otolaryngology/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(1): 94-95, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-175757

ABSTRACT

As otolaryngologists, we identify as subspecialists and fellowship-trained surgeons and may even identify as "super-subspecialists." The likelihood of being redeployed and drawing from knowledge learned during our postgraduate year 1 training seemed exceedingly unlikely until physician resources became scarce in some health care systems during the COVID-19 pandemic. More now than ever, it is evident that our broad training is valuable in helping patients and allowing the otolaryngologist to meaningfully contribute to the larger health care community, especially while the majority (70%-95%) of elective care is delayed. With our skill set, otolaryngologists are poised to support various aspects of hospital wards, intensive care units, emergency departments, and beyond.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Otolaryngologists/supply & distribution , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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