Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 3 de 3
Filter
Add filters

Language
Year range
1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The burden of long-term symptoms (i.e. long-COVID) in patients after mild COVID-19 is debated. Within a cohort of healthcare workers (HCW), frequency and risk factors for symptoms compatible with long-COVID are assessed. METHODS: Participants answered baseline (August/September 2020) and weekly questionnaires on SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) results and acute disease symptoms. In January 2021, SARS-CoV-2 serology was performed; in March, symptoms compatible with long-COVID (including psychometric scores) were asked and compared between HCW with positive NPS, seropositive HCW without positive NPS (presumable a-/pauci-symptomatic infections), and negative controls. Also, the effect of time since diagnosis and quantitative anti-S was evaluated. Poisson regression was used to identify risk factors for symptom occurrence. RESULTS: Of 3'334 HCW (median 41 years; 80% female), 556 (17%) had a positive NPS and 228 (7%) were only seropositive. HCW with positive NPS more frequently reported ≥1 symptom compared to controls (73%vs.52%, p<0.001); seropositive HCW without positive NPS did not score higher than controls (58%vs.52%, p=0.13), although impaired taste/olfaction (16%vs.6%, p<0.001) and hair loss (17%vs.10%, p=0.004) were more common. Exhaustion/burnout was reported by 24% of negative controls. Many symptoms remained elevated in those diagnosed >6 months ago; anti-S titers correlated with high symptom scores. Acute viral symptoms in weekly questionnaires best predicted long-COVID symptoms. Physical activity at baseline was negatively associated with neurocognitive impairment and fatigue scores. CONCLUSIONS: Seropositive HCW without positive NPS are only mildly affected by long-COVID. Exhaustion/burnout is common, even in non-infected HCW. Physical activity might be protective against neurocognitive impairment/fatigue symptoms after COVID-19.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296078

ABSTRACT

Background The burden of long-term symptoms (i.e. long-COVID) in patients after mild COVID-19 is debated. Within a cohort of healthcare workers (HCW), frequency and risk factors for symptoms compatible with long-COVID are assessed. Methods Participants answered baseline (August/September 2020) and weekly questionnaires on SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) results and acute disease symptoms. In January 2021, SARS-CoV-2 serology was performed;in March, symptoms compatible with long-COVID (including psychometric scores) were asked and compared between HCW with positive NPS, seropositive HCW without positive NPS (presumable a-/pauci-symptomatic infections), and negative controls. Also, the effect of time since diagnosis and quantitative anti-S was evaluated. Poisson regression was used to identify risk factors for symptom occurrence. Results Of 3’334 HCW (median 41 years;80% female), 556 (17%) had a positive NPS and 228 (7%) were only seropositive. HCW with positive NPS more frequently reported ≥1 symptom compared to controls (73% vs .52%, p<0.001);seropositive HCW without positive NPS did not score higher than controls (58%vs.52%, p=0.13), although impaired taste/olfaction (16% vs .6%, p<0.001) and hair loss (17% vs .10%, p=0.004) were more common. Exhaustion/burnout was reported by 24% of negative controls. Many symptoms remained elevated in those diagnosed >6 months ago;anti-S titers correlated with high symptom scores. Acute viral symptoms in weekly questionnaires best predicted long-COVID symptoms. Physical activity at baseline was negatively associated with neurocognitive impairment and fatigue scores. Conclusions Seropositive HCW without positive NPS are only mildly affected by long-COVID. Exhaustion/burnout is common, even in non-infected HCW. Physical activity might be protective against neurocognitive impairment/fatigue symptoms after COVID-19. summary In this prospective healthcare worker cohort, participants with SARS-CoV-2-positive nasopharyngeal swab were most likely to report long-COVID symptoms, whereas seropositive participants without positive swab were only mildly affected. Physical activity at baseline was negatively associated with neurocognitive impairment and fatigue.

3.
EClinicalMedicine ; 40: 101099, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been increasing urgency to identify pathophysiological characteristics leading to severe clinical course in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Human leukocyte antigen alleles (HLA) have been suggested as potential genetic host factors that affect individual immune response to SARS-CoV-2. We sought to evaluate this hypothesis by conducting a multicenter study using HLA sequencing. METHODS: We analyzed the association between COVID-19 severity and HLAs in 435 individuals from Germany (n = 135), Spain (n = 133), Switzerland (n = 20) and the United States (n = 147), who had been enrolled from March 2020 to August 2020. This study included patients older than 18 years, diagnosed with COVID-19 and representing the full spectrum of the disease. Finally, we tested our results by meta-analysing data from prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). FINDINGS: We describe a potential association of HLA-C*04:01 with severe clinical course of COVID-19. Carriers of HLA-C*04:01 had twice the risk of intubation when infected with SARS-CoV-2 (risk ratio 1.5 [95% CI 1.1-2.1], odds ratio 3.5 [95% CI 1.9-6.6], adjusted p-value = 0.0074). These findings are based on data from four countries and corroborated by independent results from GWAS. Our findings are biologically plausible, as HLA-C*04:01 has fewer predicted bindings sites for relevant SARS-CoV-2 peptides compared to other HLA alleles. INTERPRETATION: HLA-C*04:01 carrier state is associated with severe clinical course in SARS-CoV-2. Our findings suggest that HLA class I alleles have a relevant role in immune defense against SARS-CoV-2. FUNDING: Funded by Roche Sequencing Solutions, Inc.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL