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1.
JID Innov ; 1(1): 100004, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574793

ABSTRACT

Pemphigus is an epidemiologically heterogeneous group of autoimmune bullous diseases comprising pemphigus vulgaris (PV), pemphigus foliaceus, paraneoplastic pemphigus, IgA pemphigus, and pemphigus herpetiformis. Recently, our knowledge about the frequency of pemphigus, which is highly variable between different populations, has considerably expanded, and the first non-HLA genes associated with PV have been identified. In addition, a variety of comorbidities, including other autoimmune diseases, hematological malignancies, and psoriasis, have been described in this variant. Here, initial data about the impact of COVID-19 on this fragile patient population are discussed and perspectives for future epidemiological studies are outlined.

2.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 85(1): 79-87, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The burden of COVID-19 in patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP) and pemphigus is yet to be evaluated. OBJECTIVE: To assess the risks of COVID-19 and COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality in patients with BP and pemphigus and to delineate determinants of severe COVID-19 illness among these patients. METHODS: A population-based cohort study compared COVID-19 and its complications in patients with BP (n = 1845) and pemphigus (n = 1236) with age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched control subjects. RESULTS: The risks of COVID-19 (hazard rate [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-1.73; P = .691) and COVID-19-associated hospitalization (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.84-2.98; P = .160) was comparable between patients with BP and controls. The risk of COVID-19-associated mortality was higher among patients with BP (HR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.15-6.92; P = .023). The risk of COVID-19 (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.44-1.49; P = .496), COVID-19-associated hospitalization (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.53-3.76; P = .499), and COVID-19-associated mortality (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.15-11.92; P = .789) was similar in patients with pemphigus and their controls. Systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressants did not predispose COVID-19-positive BP and pemphigus patients to a more severe illness. LIMITATIONS: Retrospective data collection. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with BP experience increased COVID-19-associated mortality and should be monitored closely. Maintaining systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressive adjuvant agents during the pandemic is not associated with worse outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Pemphigoid, Bullous/complications , Pemphigus/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
3.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 9(5): 620-621, 2020 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919278

ABSTRACT

The reason for the apparently lower infection rate of children with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) compared to adults is still unclear. Here, we report on 4 schoolchildren with heavy exposure to SARS-CoV-2 with no clinical signs of coronavirus disease 2019, repeated negative nasopharyngeal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, and no seroconversion.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Family Health , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Child , Disease Transmission, Infectious , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Dermatol ; 59(11): 1312-1319, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889748

ABSTRACT

In the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, skin manifestations, if present, were not paid enough attention. Then, the focus moved toward the impact of the prolonged use of personal protective measures in both healthcare workers and patients. In the meantime, attention is increasingly paid to dermatology as a result of the concern for certain groups of dermatologic patients, including those whose condition may worsen by the thorough disinfection measures and those treated with immunosuppressants or immunomodulators. Following patients with psoriasis on biological therapy, as well as other inflammatory and autoimmune cutaneous disorders such as atopic dermatitis, pemphigus, pemphigoid diseases, and skin cancer provoked the interest of dermatologists. Finally, an intriguing question to the dermatologic society was whether skin changes during COVID-19 infection exist and what could be their diagnostic or prognostic value. Here, we summarize skin conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, patient information, and expert recommendations and give an overview about the registries launched to document skin changes during COVID-19, as well as details about certain patient groups infected with SARS-CoV-2, for example, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and autoimmune bullous diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Skin Diseases, Viral/virology , Chilblains/virology , Erythema/virology , Exanthema/virology , Humans , Livedo Reticularis , Patient Education as Topic , Purpura/virology , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous/virology , Skin Diseases, Viral/drug therapy , Skin Diseases, Viral/etiology , Urticaria/virology
6.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges ; 18(8): 815-824, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-675932

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has become pandemic. A further level of complexity opens up as soon as we look at diseases whose pathogenesis and therapy involve different immunological signaling pathways, which are potentially affected by COVID-19. Medical treatments must often be reassessed and questioned in connection with this infection. This article summarizes the current knowledge of COVID-19 in the light of major dermatological and allergological diseases. It identifies medical areas lacking sufficient data and draws conclusions for the management of our patients during the pandemic. We focus on common chronic inflammatory skin diseases with complex immunological pathogenesis: psoriasis, eczema including atopic dermatitis, type I allergies, autoimmune blistering and inflammatory connective tissue diseases, vasculitis, and skin cancers. Since several other inflammatory skin diseases display related or comparable immunological reactions, clustering of the various inflammatory dermatoses into different disease patterns may help with therapeutic decisions. Thus, following these patterns of skin inflammation, our review may supply treatment recommendations and thoughtful considerations for disease management even beyond the most frequent diseases discussed here.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Skin Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Skin Diseases/pathology
7.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(8): 1935-1937, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-240299

ABSTRACT

During a meeting in Munich, Germany, a presymptomatic attendee with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infected at least 11 of 13 other participants. Although 5 participants had no or mild symptoms, 6 had typical coronavirus disease, without dyspnea. Our findings suggest hand shaking and face-to-face contact as possible modes of transmission.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Congresses as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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