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1.
Transplantation Proceedings ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1616800

ABSTRACT

Background Covid-19 causes a wide range of symptoms, with particularly high risk of severe respiratory failure and death in patients with predisposing risk factors such as advanced age or obesity. Recipients of solid organ transplants, and in particular lung transplantation, are more susceptible to viral infection due to immune suppressive medication. As little is known about the SARS-CoV-2 infection in these patients, this study was undertaken to describe outcomes and potential management strategies in early COVID-19 infection early after lung transplantation. Methods We describe the incidence and outcome of COVID-19 in a cohort of recent lung transplant recipients in Munich. Six of 186 patients who underwent lung transplantation in the period between March 2019 until March 2021 developed COVID-19 within the first year after transplantation. We documented the clinical course and laboratory changes for all patients showing differences in the severity of the infection with COVID-19 and their outcomes. Results Three of six SARS-CoV-2 infections were hospital-acquired and the patients were still in inpatient treatment following lung transplantation. All patients suffered from symptoms. One patient did not received antiviral therapy. Remdesivir was prescribed in four patients and the remaining patient received remdesivir, bamlanivimab and convalescent plasma. Conclusion COVID-19 does not appear to cause milder disease in lung transplant recipients compared to the general population. Immunosuppression is potentially responsible for the delayed formation of antibodies and their premature loss. Several comorbidities and a general poor preoperative condition showed an extended hospital stay.

4.
Sports Med ; 51(7): 1401-1415, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281350

ABSTRACT

Sport is historically designated by the binary categorization of male and female that conflicts with modern society. Sport's governing bodies should consider reviewing rules determining the eligibility of athletes in the female category as there may be lasting advantages of previously high testosterone concentrations for transwomen athletes and currently high testosterone concentrations in differences in sex development (DSD) athletes. The use of serum testosterone concentrations to regulate the inclusion of such athletes into the elite female category is currently the objective biomarker that is supported by most available scientific literature, but it has limitations due to the lack of sports performance data before, during or after testosterone suppression. Innovative research studies are needed to identify other biomarkers of testosterone sensitivity/responsiveness, including molecular tools to determine the functional status of androgen receptors. The scientific community also needs to conduct longitudinal studies with specific control groups to generate the biological and sports performance data for individual sports to inform the fair inclusion or exclusion of these athletes. Eligibility of each athlete to a sport-specific policy needs to be based on peer-reviewed scientific evidence made available to policymakers from all scientific communities. However, even the most evidence-based regulations are unlikely to eliminate all differences in performance between cisgender women with and without DSD and transwomen athletes. Any remaining advantage held by transwomen or DSD women could be considered as part of the athlete's unique makeup.


Subject(s)
Athletes , Athletic Performance , Consensus , Female , Humans , Male , Sexual Development , Testosterone
6.
Clin Transplant ; 34(10): e14027, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615069

ABSTRACT

Immunosuppression leaves transplanted patients at particular risk for severe acute respiratory syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The specific features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in immunosuppressed patients are largely unknown and therapeutic experience is lacking. Seven transplanted patients (two liver, three kidneys, one double lung, one heart) admitted to the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich because of COVID-19 and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were included. The clinical course and the clinical findings were extracted from the medical record. The two liver transplant patients and the heart transplant patient had an uncomplicated course and were discharged after 14, 18, and 12 days, respectively. Two kidney transplant recipients were intubated within 48 hours. One kidney and the lung transplant recipients were required to intubate after 10 and 15 days, respectively. Immunosuppression was adapted in five patients, but continued in all patients. Compared to non-transplanted patients at the ICU (n = 19) the inflammatory response was attenuated in transplanted patients, which was proven by decreased IL-6 blood values. This analysis might provide evidence that continuous immunosuppression is safe and probably beneficial since there was no hyperinflammation evident. Although transplanted patients might be more susceptible to an infection with SARS-CoV-2, their clinical course seems to be similar to immunocompetent patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Inflammation/immunology , Organ Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Graft Rejection/immunology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/therapy , Inflammation/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Postoperative Complications/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
8.
Am J Transplant ; 20(10): 2928-2932, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-268563

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global health problem with pandemic character. Lung transplant recipients may be particularly at risk due to the high degree of immunosuppression and the lung being the organ primarily affected by COVID-19. We describe a 16-year-old male and a 64-year-old female recently lung transplanted patients with COVID-19 during inpatient rehabilitation. Both patients were receiving triple immunosuppressive therapy and had no signs of allograft dysfunction. Both patients had close contact with a person who developed COVID-19 and were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Subsequently, both patients underwent systematic screening and SARS-CoV-2 was ultimately detected. Although the 16-year-old boy was completely asymptomatic, the 64-year-old woman developed only mild COVID-19. Immunosuppressive therapy was unchanged and no experimental treatment was initiated. No signs of graft involvement or dysfunction were noticed. In conclusion, our report of patients with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and mild COVID-19, respectively, may indicate that lung transplant recipients are not per se at risk for severe COVID-19. Further observations and controlled trials are urgently needed to study SARS-CoV-2 infection in lung transplant recipients.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Lung Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Transplant Recipients , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Postoperative Period , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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