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1.
Viruses ; 14(5)2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebral complications related to the COVID-19 were documented by brain MRIs during the acute phase. The purpose of the present study was to describe the evolution of these neuroimaging findings (MRI and FDG-PET/CT) and describe the neurocognitive outcomes of these patients. METHODS: During the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak between 1 March and 31 May 2020, 112 consecutive COVID-19 patients with neurologic manifestations underwent a brain MRI at Strasbourg University hospitals. After recovery, during follow-up, of these 112 patients, 31 (initially hospitalized in intensive care units) underwent additional imaging studies (at least one brain MRI). RESULTS: Twenty-three men (74%) and eight women (26%) with a mean age of 61 years (range: 18-79) were included. Leptomeningeal enhancement, diffuse brain microhemorrhages, acute ischemic strokes, suspicion of cerebral vasculitis, and acute inflammatory demyelinating lesions were described on the initial brain MRIs. During follow-up, the evolution of the leptomeningeal enhancement was discordant, and the cerebral microhemorrhages were stable. We observed normalization of the vessel walls in all patients suspected of cerebral vasculitis. Four patients (13%) demonstrated new complications during follow-up (ischemic strokes, hypoglossal neuritis, marked increase in the white matter FLAIR hyperintensities with presumed vascular origin, and one suspected case of cerebral vasculitis). Concerning the grey matter volumetry, we observed a loss of volume of 3.2% during an average period of approximately five months. During follow-up, the more frequent FDG-PET/CT findings were hypometabolism in temporal and insular regions. CONCLUSION: A minority of initially severe COVID-19 patients demonstrated new complications on their brain MRIs during follow-up after recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vasculitis, Central Nervous System , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-309362

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID) affects all sections of the community, but some people contract the disease in a form requiring ICU admission. Immunocompromised patients (ICP) figure among the fragile patients whose access to critical care may be denied in the event of ICU bed-shortage. Our aims were: 1) to describe our management experience in seeking to assure equal critical-care consideration for both ICP and immuno-competent patients during the COVID surge, 2) to assess how successful this would be in terms of outcome for all patients, 3) to compare ICU stays of ICP, whether they survived or not, so as to detect possible prognostic factors. Methods: : We conducted a cohort study in medical ICUs of a university-affiliated hospital hit by an uncontrolled cluster of COVID. We compared the levels of activity before and during COVID: number of patients (whether COVID+ or COVID-, whether ICP or not);bed-occupancy and bed-availability;mortality rates and the need for sanitary evacuations analyzed to avoid triage decisions. Results: : During the pre-COVID period, 396 patients, including 9.3% ICP, were admitted. During the COVID period, 547 patients, including 243 COVID+ (of whom 24 ICP), were admitted: this required an 8 ICU bed-extension (+14.5% beds), a transfer of 69 immuno-competent COVID- patients to surgical ICU step-down beds, and the transfer of 22 immuno-competent COVID patients to distant hospitals. Despite sanitary evacuations, there was a daily average of 2 ICU-access refusals, the patients being taken in charge by step-down units. Health evacuations were decided on when the weekly number of COVID admissions doubled. No ICP was denied access to the ICU;no COVID- ICP was hospitalized during the first 9 weeks of the surge. 28-day mortality was 41.6% in ICP versus 27.3% in immuno-competent patients (p=0.021, log-rank test). With the exception of SAPSII and SOFA, no factor was different between clinical and ICU-stay characteristics among ICP, whether surviving or not.Conclusion and Relevance: Equal critical-care consideration for both immuno-compromised and immunocompetent patients during the COVID-19 surge was possible with acceptable outcome. Sanitary doctrine and fine-tuned hospital logistics were mandatory both at local and national level to reach this goal.

3.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3443-3447, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: COVID-19 affects the brain in various ways, amongst which delirium is worrying. An assessment was made of whether a specific, long-lasting, COVID-19-related brain injury develops in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients after life-saving re-oxygenation. METHODS: Ten COVID+ patients (COVID+) with unusual delirium associated with neuroimaging suggestive of diffuse brain injury and seven controls with non-COVID encephalopathy were studied. The assessment took place when the intractable delirium started at weaning off ventilation support. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed followed by standard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses and assessment of CSF erythropoietin concentrations (as a marker for the assessment of tissue repair), and of non-targeted CSF metabolomics using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Patients were similar as regards severity scores, but COVID+ were hospitalized longer (25 [11.75; 25] vs. 9 [4.5; 12.5] days, p = 0.03). On admission, but not at MRI and lumbar puncture performance, COVID+ were more hypoxic (p = 0.002). On MRI, there were leptomeningeal enhancement and diffuse white matter haemorrhages only in COVID+. In the latter, CSF erythropoietin concentration was lower (1.73 [1.6; 2.06] vs. 3.04 [2.9; 3.91] mIU/ml, p = 0.01), and CSF metabolomics indicated (a) increased compounds such as foodborne molecules (sesquiterpenes), molecules from industrialized beverages and micro-pollutants (diethanolamine); and (b) decreased molecules such as incomplete breakdown products of protein catabolism and foodborne molecules (glabridin). At 3-month discharge, fatigue, anxiety and depression as well as MRI lesions persisted in COVID+. CONCLUSIONS: Some COVID+ are at risk of a specific delirium. Imperfect brain repair after re-oxygenation and lifestyle factors might influence long-lasting brain injuries in a context of foodborne micro-pollutants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Environmental Pollutants , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Critical Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 7(8)2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325719

ABSTRACT

Cases of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in patients suffering from COVID-19 were described in patients with various comorbidities and outcomes. The diagnosis of PCP in these patients is difficult due to clinical and radiological similarities. We carried out this study in order to better describe potentially at-risk patients and their outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed all patients with a P. jirovecii PCR performed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tracheal aspirate, or sputum within a month after the COVID-19 diagnosis. Fifty-seven patients with COVID-19 infection were tested for P. jirovecii. Among 57 patients with COVID-19, four patients had a concomitant positive P. jirovecii PCR. These four patients were elderly with a mean age of 78. Two patients were immunocompromised, and the two others presented only diabetes mellitus. Three patients presented an ARDS requiring transfer to the ICU and mechanical ventilation. All patients presented lymphocytopenia. Three patients had probable PCP, and one had proven PCP. All patients died within two months after hospital admission. These co-infections are rare but severe, therefore, PCP should be considered in case of worsening of the condition of patients with severe COVID-19.

5.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e045041, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259009

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: International guidelines include early nutritional support (≤48 hour after admission), 20-25 kcal/kg/day, and 1.2-2 g/kg/day protein at the acute phase of critical illness. Recent data challenge the appropriateness of providing standard amounts of calories and protein during acute critical illness. Restricting calorie and protein intakes seemed beneficial, suggesting a role for metabolic pathways such as autophagy, a potential key mechanism in safeguarding cellular integrity, notably in the muscle, during critical illness. However, the optimal calorie and protein supply at the acute phase of severe critical illness remains unknown. NUTRIREA-3 will be the first trial to compare standard calorie and protein feeding complying with guidelines to low-calorie low-protein feeding. We hypothesised that nutritional support with calorie and protein restriction during acute critical illness decreased day 90 mortality and/or dependency on intensive care unit (ICU) management in mechanically ventilated patients receiving vasoactive amine therapy for shock, compared with standard calorie and protein targets. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: NUTRIREA-3 is a randomised, controlled, multicentre, open-label trial comparing two parallel groups of patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and vasoactive amine therapy for shock and given early nutritional support according to one of two strategies: early calorie-protein restriction (6 kcal/kg/day-0.2-0.4 g/kg/day) or standard calorie-protein targets (25 kcal/kg/day, 1.0-1.3 g/kg/day) at the acute phase defined as the first 7 days in the ICU. We will include 3044 patients in 61 French ICUs. Two primary end-points will be evaluated: day 90 mortality and time to ICU discharge readiness. The trial will be considered positive if significant between-group differences are found for one or both alternative primary endpoints. Secondary outcomes include hospital-acquired infections and nutritional, clinical and functional outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The NUTRIREA-3 study has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee. Patients are included after informed consent. Results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03573739.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Protein-Restricted , Adult , Critical Illness , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Infect Dis ; 223(4): 600-609, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological manifestations are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but little is known about pathophysiological mechanisms. In this single-center study, we examined neurological manifestations in 58 patients, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and neuroimaging findings. METHODS: The study included 58 patients with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations in whom severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction screening and on CSF analysis were performed. Clinical, laboratory, and brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Patients were mostly men (66%), with a median age of 62 years. Encephalopathy was frequent (81%), followed by pyramidal dysfunction (16%), seizures (10%), and headaches (5%). CSF protein and albumin levels were increased in 38% and 23%, respectively. A total of 40% of patients displayed an elevated albumin quotient, suggesting impaired blood-brain barrier integrity. CSF-specific immunoglobulin G oligoclonal band was found in 5 patients (11%), suggesting an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G, and 26 patients (55%) presented identical oligoclonal bands in serum and CSF. Four patients (7%) had a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Leptomeningeal enhancement was present on brain MR images in 20 patients (38%). CONCLUSIONS: Brain MR imaging abnormalities, especially leptomeningeal enhancement, and increased inflammatory markers in CSF are frequent in patients with neurological manifestations related to COVID-19, whereas SARS-CoV-2 detection in CSF remained scanty.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , Blood-Brain Barrier/diagnostic imaging , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , France , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
7.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3443-3447, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: COVID-19 affects the brain in various ways, amongst which delirium is worrying. An assessment was made of whether a specific, long-lasting, COVID-19-related brain injury develops in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients after life-saving re-oxygenation. METHODS: Ten COVID+ patients (COVID+) with unusual delirium associated with neuroimaging suggestive of diffuse brain injury and seven controls with non-COVID encephalopathy were studied. The assessment took place when the intractable delirium started at weaning off ventilation support. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed followed by standard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses and assessment of CSF erythropoietin concentrations (as a marker for the assessment of tissue repair), and of non-targeted CSF metabolomics using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Patients were similar as regards severity scores, but COVID+ were hospitalized longer (25 [11.75; 25] vs. 9 [4.5; 12.5] days, p = 0.03). On admission, but not at MRI and lumbar puncture performance, COVID+ were more hypoxic (p = 0.002). On MRI, there were leptomeningeal enhancement and diffuse white matter haemorrhages only in COVID+. In the latter, CSF erythropoietin concentration was lower (1.73 [1.6; 2.06] vs. 3.04 [2.9; 3.91] mIU/ml, p = 0.01), and CSF metabolomics indicated (a) increased compounds such as foodborne molecules (sesquiterpenes), molecules from industrialized beverages and micro-pollutants (diethanolamine); and (b) decreased molecules such as incomplete breakdown products of protein catabolism and foodborne molecules (glabridin). At 3-month discharge, fatigue, anxiety and depression as well as MRI lesions persisted in COVID+. CONCLUSIONS: Some COVID+ are at risk of a specific delirium. Imperfect brain repair after re-oxygenation and lifestyle factors might influence long-lasting brain injuries in a context of foodborne micro-pollutants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Environmental Pollutants , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Critical Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Trials ; 22(1): 131, 2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083070

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous lidocaine on gas exchange and inflammation in acute respiratory distress syndrome due or not to Covid-19 pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: This is a prospective monocentric, randomized, quadruple-blinded and placebo-controlled superiority trial. This phase 3 clinical study is based on two parallel groups received either intravenous lidocaine 2% or intravenous NaCl 0.9%. PARTICIPANTS: This study has been conducted at the University Hospitals of Strasbourg (medical and surgical Intensive Care Units in Hautepierre Hospital) since the 4th November 2020. The participants are 18 years-old and older, hospitalized in ICU for a moderate to severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition; they have to be intubated and sedated for mechanical protective ventilation. All participants are affiliated to the French Social security system and a dosage of beta HCG has to be negative for women of child bearing age . For the Covid-19 subgroup, the SARS-CoV2 infection is proved by RT-PCR <7 days before admission and/or another approved diagnostic technique and/or typical CT appearance pneumonia. The data are prospectively collected in e-Case Report Forms and extracted from clinical files. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: The participants are randomised in two parallel groups with a 1:1 ratio. In the experimental group, patients receive intravenous lidocaine 2% (20mg/mL) (from FRESENIUS KABI France); the infusion protocol provide a bolus of 1 mg/kg (ideal weight), followed by 3 mg/kg/h for the first hour, 1.5 mg/kg/h for the second hour, 0.72 mg/kg/h for the next 22 hours and then 0.6 mg/kg/h for 14 days at most or 24 hours after extubation or ventilator-weaning. The patients in the control group receive intravenous NaCl 0.9% (9 mg/mL) (from Aguettant, France) as placebo comparator; the infusion protocol provide a bolus of 0.05 mL/kg (ideal weight), followed by 0.15 mL/kg/h for the first hour, 0.075 mL/kg/h for the second hour, 0.036 mL/kg/h for the next 22 hours, and the 0.03 mL/kg/h for up to 14 days or 24 hours after extubation or ventilator-weaning. Lidocaine level is assessed at H4, D2, D7 and D14 to prevent local anesthetics systemic toxicity. Clinical data and biological samples are collected to assess disease progression. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary outcome is the evolution of alveolar-capillary gas exchange measured by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio after two days of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study include the following: Evolution of PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission and after 21 days of treatment Number of ventilator-free days Anti-inflammatory effects by dosing inflammatory markers at different timepoints (ferritin, bicarbonate, CRP, PCT, LDH, IL-6, Troponin HS, triglycerides, complete blood count, lymphocytes) Anti-thrombotic effects by dosing platelets, aPTT, fibrinogen, D-dimers, viscoelastic testing and identification of all thromboembolic events up to 4 weeks. Plasmatic concentration of lidocaine and albumin Incidence of adverse events like cardiac rhythm disorders, need of vasopressors, any modification of the QRS, QTc or PR intervals every day Ileus recovery time Consumption of hypnotics, opioids, neuromuscular blockers. Lengths of stay in the ICU, incidence of reintubation and complications due to intensive care unit care (mortality until 90 days, pneumothorax, bacterial pneumopathy, bronchospasm, cardiogenic shock, acute renal failure, need of renal dialysis, delirium, atrial fibrillation, stroke (CAM-ICU score), tetraplegia (MCR score)). Incidence of cough and sore throat at extubation or ventilator-weaning and within 24 hours. All these outcomes will be evaluated according to positivity to Sars-Cov-2. RANDOMISATION: The participants who meet the inclusion criteria and have signed written informed consent will be randomly allocated using a computer-generated random number to either intervention group or control group. The distribution ratio of the two groups will be 1:1, with a stratification according to positivity to Sars-Cov-2. BLINDING (MASKING): All participants, care providers, investigator and outcomes assessor are blinded. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): We planned to randomize fifty participants in each group, 100 participants total. TRIAL STATUS: The amended protocol version 2.1 was approved by the Ethics Committee "Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud-Méditerranée II on January 8, 2021 and by the Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) on November 10, 2020. The study is currently recruiting participants; the recruitment started in November 2020 and the planned recruitment period is three years. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov on October 30, 2020 and identified by number NCT04609865 . FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Lidocaine/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Administration, Intravenous , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Equivalence Trials as Topic , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Pulmonary Gas Exchange , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
9.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 40(1): 100780, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942688

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Ground-glass opacities are the most frequent radiologic features of COVID-19 patients. We aimed to determine the feasibility of automated lung volume measurements, including ground-glass volumes, on the CT of suspected COVID-19 patients. Our goal was to create an automated and quantitative measure of ground-glass opacities from lung CT images that could be used clinically for diagnosis, triage and research. DESIGN: Single centre, retrospective, observational study. MEASUREMENTS: Demographic data, respiratory support treatment (synthetised in the maximal respiratory severity score) and CT-images were collected. Volume of abnormal lung parenchyma was measured with conventional semi-automatic software and with a novel automated algorithm based on voxels X-Ray attenuation. We looked for the relationship between the automated and semi-automated evaluations. The association between the ground-glass opacities volume and the maximal respiratory severity score was assessed. MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients were included in the main outcome analysis. The mean duration of automated and semi-automated volume measurement process were 15 (2) and 93 (41) min, respectively (p=8.05*10-8). The intraclass correlation coefficient between the semi-automated and automated measurement of ground-glass opacities and restricted normally aerated lung were both superior to 0.99. The association between the automated measured lung volume and the maximal clinical severity score was statistically significant for the restricted normally aerated (p=0.0097, effect-size: -385mL) volumes and for the ratio of ground-glass opacities/restricted normally aerated volumes (p=0.027, effect-size: 3.3). CONCLUSION: The feasibility and preliminary validity of automated impaired lung volume measurements in a high-density COVID-19 cluster was confirmed by our results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung Volume Measurements/methods , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Algorithms , Automation , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Software , Supine Position , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Triage
10.
J Neurol ; 268(8): 2676-2684, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 outbreak, the presence of extensive white matter microhemorrhages was detected by brain MRIs. The goal of this study was to investigate the origin of this atypical hemorrhagic complication. METHODS: Between March 17 and May 18, 2020, 80 patients with severe COVID-19 infections were admitted for acute respiratory distress syndrome to intensive care units at the University Hospitals of Strasbourg for whom a brain MRI for neurologic manifestations was performed. 19 patients (24%) with diffuse microhemorrhages were compared to 18 control patients with COVID-19 and normal brain MRI. RESULTS: The first hypothesis was hypoxemia. The latter seemed very likely since respiratory failure was longer and more pronounced in patients with microhemorrhages (prolonged endotracheal intubation (p = 0.0002), higher FiO2 (p = 0.03), increased use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (p = 0.04)). A relevant hypothesis, the role of microangiopathy, was also considered, since patients with microhemorrhages presented a higher increase of the D-Dimers (p = 0.01) and a tendency to more frequent thrombotic events (p = 0.12). Another hypothesis tested was the role of kidney failure, which was more severe in the group with diffuse microhemorrhages (higher creatinine level [median of 293 µmol/L versus 112 µmol/L, p = 0.04] and more dialysis were introduced in this group during ICU stay [12 versus 5 patients, p = 0.04]). CONCLUSIONS: Blood-brain barrier dysfunction secondary to hypoxemia and high concentration of uremic toxins seems to be the main mechanism leading to critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds, and this complication remains to be frequently described in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Cerebral Hemorrhage/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 98(4): 115181, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725737

ABSTRACT

Rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial for successful outbreak containment. During the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency, the gold standard for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection diagnosis is the detection of viral RNA. Additional diagnostic methods õenabling the detection of current or past SARS-CoV-2 infection would be highly beneficial. We assessed 2 immunochromatographic lateral flow assays (LFA-1, LFA-2) and 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits (IgA/IgG ELISA-1, IgM/IgG ELISA-2) using 325 samples: serum samples from polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID-19 hospitalized patients (n = 55) and healthcare workers (n = 143) and 127 samples from negative controls. Diagnostic performances were assessed according to days after symptom onset (dso) and the antigenic format used by manufacturers. Clinical sensitivities varied greatly among the assays, showing poor mutual agreement. After 15 dso, ELISA-1 (Euroimmun) and LFA-1 (Biosynex) combining IgM and IgG detection showed the best performances. A thorough selection of serological assays for the detection of ongoing or past infections is advisable.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Immunoassay/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
12.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 491, 2020 08 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurotropism of SARS-CoV-2 and its neurological manifestations have now been confirmed. We aimed at describing delirium and neurological symptoms of COVID-19 in ICU patients. METHODS: We conducted a bicentric cohort study in two French ICUs of Strasbourg University Hospital. All the 150 patients referred for acute respiratory distress syndrome due to SARS-CoV-2 between March 3 and May 5, 2020, were included at their admission. Ten patients (6.7%) were excluded because they remained under neuromuscular blockers during their entire ICU stay. Neurological examination, including CAM-ICU, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, electroencephalography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in some of the patients with delirium and/or abnormal neurological examination. The primary endpoint was to describe the incidence of delirium and/or abnormal neurological examination. The secondary endpoints were to describe the characteristics of delirium, to compare the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation and ICU length of stay in patients with and without delirium and/or abnormal neurological symptoms. RESULTS: The 140 patients were aged in median of 62 [IQR 52; 70] years old, with a median SAPSII of 49 [IQR 37; 64] points. Neurological examination was normal in 22 patients (15.7%). One hundred eighteen patients (84.3%) developed a delirium with a combination of acute attention, awareness, and cognition disturbances. Eighty-eight patients (69.3%) presented an unexpected state of agitation despite high infusion rates of sedative treatments and neuroleptics, and 89 (63.6%) patients had corticospinal tract signs. Brain MRI performed in 28 patients demonstrated enhancement of subarachnoid spaces in 17/28 patients (60.7%), intraparenchymal, predominantly white matter abnormalities in 8 patients, and perfusion abnormalities in 17/26 patients (65.4%). The 42 electroencephalograms mostly revealed unspecific abnormalities or diffuse, especially bifrontal, slow activity. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed inflammatory disturbances in 18/28 patients, including oligoclonal bands with mirror pattern and elevated IL-6. The CSF RT-PCR SARS-CoV-2 was positive in one patient. The delirium/neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients were responsible for longer mechanical ventilation compared to the patients without delirium/neurological symptoms. Delirium/neurological symptoms could be secondary to systemic inflammatory reaction to SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Delirium/neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients are a major issue in ICUs, especially in the context of insufficient human and material resources. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NA.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delirium/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(6): 1089-1098, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-191941

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Little evidence of increased thrombotic risk is available in COVID-19 patients. Our purpose was to assess thrombotic risk in severe forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: All patients referred to 4 intensive care units (ICUs) from two centers of a French tertiary hospital for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19 between March 3rd and 31st 2020 were included. Medical history, symptoms, biological data and imaging were prospectively collected. Propensity score matching was performed to analyze the occurrence of thromboembolic events between non-COVID-19 ARDS and COVID-19 ARDS patients. RESULTS: 150 COVID-19 patients were included (122 men, median age 63 [53; 71] years, SAPSII 49 [37; 64] points). Sixty-four clinically relevant thrombotic complications were diagnosed in 150 patients, mainly pulmonary embolisms (16.7%). 28/29 patients (96.6%) receiving continuous renal replacement therapy experienced circuit clotting. Three thrombotic occlusions (in 2 patients) of centrifugal pump occurred in 12 patients (8%) supported by ECMO. Most patients (> 95%) had elevated D-dimer and fibrinogen. No patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation. Von Willebrand (vWF) activity, vWF antigen and FVIII were considerably increased, and 50/57 tested patients (87.7%) had positive lupus anticoagulant. Comparison with non-COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 145) confirmed that COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 77) developed significantly more thrombotic complications, mainly pulmonary embolisms (11.7 vs. 2.1%, p < 0.008). Coagulation parameters significantly differed between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Despite anticoagulation, a high number of patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 developed life-threatening thrombotic complications. Higher anticoagulation targets than in usual critically ill patients should therefore probably be suggested.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , France/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Propensity Score , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/mortality , Thrombosis/virology
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