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1.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 12(1): 371-380, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditional in-person Parkinson's disease (PD) research studies are often slow to recruit and place unnecessary burden on participants. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has added new impetus to the development of new research models. OBJECTIVE: To compare recruitment processes and outcomes of three remote decentralized observational PD studies with video visits. METHODS: We examined the number of participants recruited, speed of recruitment, geographic distribution of participants, and strategies used to enhance recruitment in FIVE, a cross-sectional study of Fox Insight participants with and without PD (n = 203); VALOR-PD, a longitudinal study of 23andMe, Inc. research participants carrying the LRRK2 G2019S variant with and without PD (n = 277); and AT-HOME PD, a longitudinal study of former phase III clinical trial participants with PD (n = 226). RESULTS: Across the three studies, 706 participants from 45 U.S. states and Canada enrolled at a mean per study rate of 4.9 participants per week over an average of 51 weeks. The cohorts were demographically homogenous with regard to race (over 95%white) and level of education (over 90%with more than a high school education). The number of participants living in primary care Health Professional Shortage Areas in each study ranged from 30.3-42.9%. Participants reported interest in future observational (98.5-99.6%) and interventional (76.1-87.6%) research studies with remote video visits. CONCLUSION: Recruitment of large, geographically dispersed remote cohorts from a single location is feasible. Interest in participation in future remote decentralized PD studies is high. More work is needed to identify best practices for recruitment, particularly of diverse participants.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease , Patient Selection , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy
2.
Clin Park Relat Disord ; 4: 100094, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240555

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Parkinson's disease (PD) research is hampered by slow, inefficient recruitment and burdensome in-person assessments that may be challenging to conduct in a world affected by COVID-19. Fox Insight is an ongoing prospective clinical research study that enables individuals to participate in clinical research from their own homes by completing online questionnaires. To date, over 45,000 participants with and without PD have enrolled. We sought to validate self-reported PD diagnosis in the Fox Insight cohort, assess the validity of other self-reported health information, and evaluate the willingness of participants to participate in video-based research studies. METHODS: Individuals with and without self-reported PD enrolled in Fox Insight were invited to participate in this virtual research study. Participants completed online questionnaires and two virtual visits, during which we conducted standard cognitive and motor assessments. A movement disorder expert determined the most likely diagnosis, which was compared to self-reported diagnosis. RESULTS: A total of 203 participants from 40 U.S. states, 159 with remote clinician-determined PD and 44 without, completed the study (59% male, mean (SD) age 65.7 (9.8)). Level of agreement between self-reported PD diagnosis in Fox Insight and clinician-determined diagnosis was very good ((kappa = 0.85, 95% CI 0.76-0.94). Overall, 97.9% of participants were satisfied with the study, 98.5% were willing to participate in a future observational study with virtual visits, and 76.1% were willing to participate in an interventional trial with virtual visits. CONCLUSION: Among the Fox Insight cohort, self-reported diagnosis is accurate and interest in virtual research studies is high.

3.
Radiol Case Rep ; 16(7): 1815-1818, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221015

ABSTRACT

The request for CT (computed tomography) diagnostic in patients with suspected COVID-19 pneumonia has become part of the daily clinical routine. We reported a case of a 61-year-old patient with flu-like symptoms and a suspected COVID-19 pneumonia. After a negative PCR-test (polymerase chain reaction), a non-contrast enhanced CT was performed which revealed a suspicious hyperdensity in the left pulmonary artery and a pneumonia in the left lower lobe. A contrast enhanced CT confirmed a pulmonary embolism. An acute pulmonary embolism is a major complication and a main differential diagnosis of COVID-19. A hyperdense pulmonary artery sign (PAS) is a sensitive sign for a pulmonary embolism. Non-enhanced chest CT scans should be checked for hyperdense PAS in suspected of COVID-19 patients.

4.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(s1): S27-S34, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045530

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced the abrupt and rapid expansion of an alternative care model that embraces the use of video-based visits in the care of persons with Parkinson's disease. Video-based visits not only eliminate the risk of infection but also reduce geography- and disability-related barriers to accessing specialist care. Research has established that they are feasible, acceptable to persons with Parkinson's disease and patient-centered. In the Unites States, the relaxation of licensure requirements, adoption of reimbursement parity and investment in telemedicine infrastructure has enabled the rapid growth of video-based visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, we must turn our attention to ensuring that progress made in expanding access to video-based care is not lost and expanded worldwide. More work is needed to identify the optimal video-based care model, establish best practices, and ensure equitable access to care.


Subject(s)
Disease Management , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics
5.
J Neuroimaging ; 31(2): 228-243, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015550

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The ongoing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 is occasionally associated with manifold diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). We sought to present the neuroimaging features of such CNS involvement. In addition, we sought to identify typical neuroimaging patterns that could indicate possible COVID-19-associated neurological manifestations. METHODS: In this systematic literature review, typical neuroimaging features of cerebrovascular diseases and inflammatory processes associated with COVID-19 were analyzed. Reports presenting individual patient data were included in further quantitative analysis with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We identified 115 studies reporting a total of 954 COVID-19 patients with associated neurological manifestations and neuroimaging alterations. A total of 95 (82.6%) of the identified studies were single case reports or case series, whereas 660 (69.2%) of the reported cases included individual information and were thus included in descriptive statistical analysis. Ischemia with neuroimaging patterns of large vessel occlusion event was revealed in 59.9% of ischemic stroke patients, whereas 69.2% of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage exhibited bleeding in a location that was not associated with hypertension. Callosal and/or juxtacortical location was identified in 58.7% of cerebral microbleed positive images. Features of hemorrhagic necrotizing encephalitis were detected in 28.8% of patients with meningo-/encephalitis. CONCLUSIONS: Manifold CNS involvement is increasingly reported in COVID-19 patients. Typical and atypical neuroimaging features have been observed in some disease entities, so that familiarity with these imaging patterns appears reasonable and may assist clinicians in the differential diagnosis of COVID-19 CNS manifestations.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neuroimaging , Pandemics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(2): 308-320, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985903

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The expanding power and accessibility of personal technology provide an opportunity to reduce burdens and costs of traditional clinical site-centric therapeutic trials in Parkinson's disease and generate novel insights. The value of this approach has never been more evident than during the current COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to (1) establish and implement the infrastructure for longitudinal, virtual follow-up of clinical trial participants, (2) compare changes in smartphone-based assessments, online patient-reported outcomes, and remote expert assessments, and (3) explore novel digital markers of Parkinson's disease disability and progression. METHODS: Participants from two recently completed phase III clinical trials of inosine and isradipine enrolled in Assessing Tele-Health Outcomes in Multiyear Extensions of Parkinson's Disease trials (AT-HOME PD), a two-year virtual cohort study. After providing electronic informed consent, individuals complete annual video visits with a movement disorder specialist, smartphone-based assessments of motor function and socialization, and patient-reported outcomes online. RESULTS: From the two clinical trials, 226 individuals from 42 states in the United States and Canada enrolled. Of these, 181 (80%) have successfully downloaded the study's smartphone application and 161 (71%) have completed patient-reported outcomes on the online platform. INTERPRETATION: It is feasible to conduct a large-scale, international virtual observational study following the completion of participation in brick-and-mortar clinical trials in Parkinson's disease. This study, which brings research to participants, will compare established clinical endpoints with novel digital biomarkers and thereby inform the longitudinal follow-up of clinical trial participants and design of future clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Research Design , Smartphone , Telemedicine , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Canada , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disease Progression , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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