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1.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 13(3): 705-709, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748360

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We compared the prevalence of COVID-19 and related mortality in nursing homes (NHs) in 14 countries until October 2021. We explored the relationship between COVID-19 mortality in NHs with the average size of NHs and with the COVID-19 deaths at a population level. METHODS: The total number of COVID-19 cases and COVID-19-related deaths in all NHs as well as the total number of NHs and NH beds were provided by representatives of 14 countries. The population level respective figures in each country were provided up to October 2021. RESULTS: There was a wide variation in prevalence of COVID-19 cases and deaths between countries. We observed a significant correlation between COVID-19 deaths in NHs and that of the total population and between the mean size of NHs and COVID-19 deaths. CONCLUSION: Side-by-side comparisons between countries allow international sharing of good practice to better enable future pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 13(1): 291-304, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525643

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe a guidance on the management of post-acute COVID 19 patients in geriatric rehabilitation. METHODS: The guidance is based on guidelines for post-acute COVID-19 geriatric rehabilitation developed in the Netherlands, updated with recent insights from literature, related guidance from other countries and disciplines, and combined with experiences from experts in countries participating in the Geriatric Rehabilitation Special Interest Group of the European Geriatric Medicine Society. RESULTS: This guidance for post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation is divided into a section addressing general recommendations for geriatric rehabilitation and a section addressing specific processes and procedures. The Sect. "General recommendations for geriatric rehabilitation" addresses: (1) general requirements for post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation and (2) critical aspects for quality assurance during COVID-19 pandemic. The Sect. "Specific processes and procedures", addresses the following topics: (1) patient selection; (2) admission; (3) treatment; (4) discharge; and (5) follow-up and monitoring. CONCLUSION: Providing tailored geriatric rehabilitation treatment to post-acute COVID-19 patients is a challenge for which the guidance is designed to provide support. There is a strong need for additional evidence on COVID-19 geriatric rehabilitation including developing an understanding of risk profiles of older patients living with frailty to develop individualised treatment regimes. The present guidance will be regularly updated based on additional evidence from practice and research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Geriatrics , Aged , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr ; 52(1)2021 Mar 23.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190787

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on older and frail people underlines the importance of advance care planning (ACP). ACP is a dynamic communication process involving patients, families and healthcare providers, which serves to discuss and document wishes and goals for future care. Currently, ACP practice is often suboptimal. This implies that important decisions about care and treatment may need to be made acutely in crises. Many factors contribute to suboptimal ACP practice. One such factor is ambiguity regarding roles and responsibilities of different disciplines in the ACP-process. The perception that having ACP conversations is primarily a physician's task is a misconception. Specific skills that could contribute to a holistic and person-centered ACP-process are largely lacking in nursing curricula and therefore, may be insufficient and under-utilized. For instance, nursing staff could involve persons in conversations about meaning, quality of life, loss and grief as a part of ACP. Moreover, they may communicate a patient's wishes to other healthcare providers including physicians. Acknowledgement of this potential role, by physicians as well as by nursing staff themselves, is needed for ACP to become a truly interprofessional process.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning , COVID-19 , Humans , Nurse's Role , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr ; 52(1)2021 Mar 23.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190786

ABSTRACT

Despite compliance with national (RIVM) guidelines, nursing home Mariënburght (the Netherlands) was severely affected during the first COVID-19 wave: 68 (68%) of the residents were infected. This resulted in a large emotional impact on the (nursing) staff. This study aims to describe the experiences of (nursing) staff, as well as the results of serological tests on COVID-19 that have been administered to professionals. All professionals (n=281) were invited for group interviews to share their experiences concerning the COVID-19 outbreak and for a serological test for COVID-19. The 29 professionals participating in the group interviews mentioned negative and positive experiences about their fear and anxiety, the changed care for residents, the team spirit, the use of personal protective equipment and the testing policy. Out of 240 professionals who underwent the serological test and completed a questionnaire, 94 professionals (39%) had COVID-19 antibodies. In this group, 18 professionals (19%) indicated not having experienced any (physical) complaints related to COVID. Insight into the experiences of professionals resulted in essential learning points, in particular the importance of clear communication with and emotional support for staff. This study also reveals that many professionals of nursing home Mariënburght were affected by COVID-19. An important finding is the high percentage of asymptomatic employees (19% of 94 infected). Our results contributed to changed national testing policies and adapted recommendations in the use of personal protective equipment in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests
5.
Age Ageing ; 50(3): 605-607, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028708

ABSTRACT

Older multi-morbid persons often fall seriously ill due to COVID-19. To be able to participate in a social life again, they often need special rehabilitation measures. Geriatric rehabilitation is a multi-professional service geared to these needs. Paradoxically, however, capacities in geriatric rehabilitation are currently being reduced despite increasing demand. The reasons are manifold and are not only due to the current situation. This article highlights the current situation leading to the COVID rehabilitation paradox and shows ways to learn from it for the future.


Subject(s)
Aging , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Health Services for the Aged , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Forecasting , Humans , Pandemics , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 11(6): 899-913, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898206

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The European Geriatric Medicine Society (EuGMS) is launching a second interim guidance whose aim is to prevent the entrance and spread of COVID-19 into long-term care facilities (LTCFs). METHODS: The EuGMS gathered experts to propose a guide of measures to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in LTCFs. It is based on the specific features of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in LTCFs, residents' needs, and on experiences conducted in the field. RESULTS: Asymptomatic COVID-19 residents and staff members contribute substantially to the dissemination of COVID-19 infection in LTCFs. An infection prevention and control focal point should be set up in every LTCF for (1) supervising infection prevention and control measures aimed at keeping COVID-19 out of LTCFs, (2) RT-PCR testing of residents, staff members, and visitors with COVID-19 symptoms, even atypical, and (3) isolating subjects either infected or in contact with infected subjects. When a first LCTF resident or staff member is infected, a facility-wide RT-PCR test-retest strategy should be implemented for detecting all SARS-CoV-2 carriers. Testing should continue until no new COVID-19 cases are identified. The isolation of residents should be limited as much as possible and associated with measures aiming at limiting its negative effects on their mental and somatic health status. CONCLUSIONS: An early recognition of symptoms compatible with COVID-19 may help to diagnose COVID-19 residents and staff more promptly. Subsequently, an earlier testing for SARS-CoV-2 symptomatic and asymptomatic LTCF staff and residents will enable the implementation of appropriate infection prevention and control. The negative effects of social isolation in residents should be limited as much as possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Geriatrics , Long-Term Care , Skilled Nursing Facilities , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Europe , Geriatrics/methods , Geriatrics/organization & administration , Humans , Long-Term Care/classification , Long-Term Care/methods , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation
8.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 113: 103781, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The acute nature of COVID-19 and its effects on society in terms of social distancing and quarantine regulations affect the provision of palliative care for people with dementia who live in long-term care facilities. The current COVID-19 pandemic poses a challenge to nursing staff, who are in a key position to provide high-quality palliative care for people with dementia and their families. OBJECTIVE: To formulate practice recommendations for nursing staff with regard to providing palliative dementia care in times of COVID-19. DESIGN AND METHOD: A rapid scoping review following guidelines from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Eligible papers focused on COVID-19 in combination with palliative care for older people or people with dementia and informed practical nursing recommendations for long-term care facilities. After data extraction, we formulated recommendations covering essential domains in palliative care adapted from the National Consensus Project's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. DATA SOURCES: We searched the bibliographic databases of PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO for academic publications. We searched for grey literature using the search engine Google. Moreover, we included relevant letters and editorials, guidelines, web articles and policy papers published by knowledge and professional institutes or associations in dementia and palliative care. RESULTS: In total, 23 documents (7 (special) articles in peer-reviewed journals, 6 guides, 4 letters to editors, 2 web articles (blogs), 2 reports, a correspondence paper and a position paper) were included. The highest number of papers informed recommendations under the domains 'advance care planning' and 'psychological aspects of care'. The lowest number of papers informed the domains 'ethical care', 'care of the dying', 'spiritual care' and 'bereavement care'. We found no papers that informed the 'cultural aspects of care' domain. CONCLUSION: Literature that focuses specifically on palliative care for people with dementia in long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic is still largely lacking. Particular challenges that need addressing involve care of the dying and the bereaved, and ethical, cultural and spiritual aspects of care. Moreover, we must acknowledge grief and moral distress among nursing staff. Nursing leadership is needed to safeguard the quality of care and nursing staff should work together within an interprofessional care team to initiate advance care planning conversations in a timely manner, to review and document advance care plans, and to adapt goals of care as they may change due to the COVID-19 situation. Tweetable abstract: The current COVID-19 pandemic affects people living with dementia, their families and their professional caregivers. This rapid scoping review searched for academic and grey literature to formulate practical recommendations for nursing staff working in long-term care facilities on how to provide palliative care for people with dementia in times of COVID-19. There is a particular need for grief and bereavement support and we must acknowledge grief and moral distress among nursing staff. This review exposes practice and knowledge gaps in the response to COVID-19 that reflect the longstanding neglect and weaknesses of palliative care in the long-term care sector. Nursing leadership is needed to safeguard the quality of palliative care, interprofessional collaboration and peer support among nursing staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/nursing , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Nursing, Practical , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Long-Term Care , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 68(8): 1647-1652, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Nursing home (NH) residents are a vulnerable population, susceptible to respiratory disease outbreaks such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Poor outcome in COVID-19 is at least partly attributed to hypercoagulability, resulting in a high incidence of thromboembolic complications. It is unknown whether commonly used antithrombotic therapies may protect the vulnerable NH population with COVID-19 against mortality. This study aimed to investigate whether the use of oral antithrombotic therapy (OAT) was associated with a lower mortality in NH residents with COVID-19. DESIGN: A retrospective case series. SETTING: Fourteen NH facilities from the NH organization Envida, Maastricht, the Netherlands PARTICIPANTS: A total of 101 NH residents with COVID-19 were enrolled. MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. The association between age, sex, comorbidity, OAT, and mortality was assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Overall mortality was 47.5% in NH residents from 14 NH facilities. Age, comorbidity, and medication use were comparable among NH residents who survived and who died. OAT was associated with a lower mortality in NH residents with COVID-19 in the univariable analysis (odds ratio (OR) = 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.41-1.95). However, additional adjustments for sex, age, and comorbidity attenuated this difference. Mortality in males was higher compared with female residents (OR = 3.96; 95% CI = 1.62-9.65). Male residents who died were younger compared with female residents (82.2 (standard deviation (SD) = 6.3) vs 89.1 (SD = 6.8) years; P < .001). CONCLUSION: NH residents in the 14 facilities we studied were severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a mortality of 47.5%. Male NH residents with COVID-19 had worse outcomes than females. We did not find evidence for any protection against mortality by OAT, necessitating further research into strategies to mitigate poor outcome of COVID-19 in vulnerable NH populations. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:1647-1652, 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Thromboembolism/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Homes for the Aged , Humans , Incidence , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Nursing Homes , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/virology
11.
Age Ageing ; 49(5): 701-705, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-247828

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected care home residents internationally, with 19-72% of COVID-19 deaths occurring in care homes. COVID-19 presents atypically in care home residents and up to 56% of residents may test positive whilst pre-symptomatic. In this article, we provide a commentary on challenges and dilemmas identified in the response to COVID-19 for care homes and their residents. We highlight the low sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction testing and the difficulties this poses for blanket screening and isolation of residents. We discuss quarantine of residents and the potential harms associated with this. Personal protective equipment supply for care homes during the pandemic has been suboptimal and we suggest that better integration of procurement and supply is required. Advance care planning has been challenged by the pandemic and there is a need to for healthcare staff to provide support to care homes with this. Finally, we discuss measures to implement augmented care in care homes, including treatment with oxygen and subcutaneous fluids, and the frameworks which will be required if these are to be sustainable. All of these challenges must be met by healthcare, social care and government agencies if care home residents and staff are to be physically and psychologically supported during this time of crisis for care homes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Homes for the Aged , Long-Term Care , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Services Needs and Demand , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Homes for the Aged/standards , Humans , Long-Term Care/methods , Long-Term Care/standards , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Nursing Homes/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Quarantine/organization & administration , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
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