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1.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517636

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e216842, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198342

ABSTRACT

Importance: Critical illness, a marked inflammatory response, and viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 may prolong corrected QT interval (QTc). Objective: To evaluate baseline QTc interval on 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) and ensuing changes among patients with and without COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study included 3050 patients aged 18 years and older who underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing and had ECGs at Columbia University Irving Medical Center from March 1 through May 1, 2020. Patients were analyzed by treatment group over 5 days, as follows: hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin, hydroxychloroquine alone, azithromycin alone, and neither hydroxychloroquine nor azithromycin. ECGs were manually analyzed by electrophysiologists masked to COVID-19 status. Multivariable modeling evaluated clinical associations with QTc prolongation from baseline. Exposures: COVID-19, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mean QTc prolongation, percentage of patients with QTc of 500 milliseconds or greater. Results: A total of 965 patients had more than 2 ECGs and were included in the study, with 561 (58.1%) men, 198 (26.2%) Black patients, and 191 (19.8%) aged 80 years and older. There were 733 patients (76.0%) with COVID-19 and 232 patients (24.0%) without COVID-19. COVID-19 infection was associated with significant mean QTc prolongation from baseline by both 5-day and 2-day multivariable models (5-day, patients with COVID-19: 20.81 [95% CI, 15.29 to 26.33] milliseconds; P < .001; patients without COVID-19: -2.01 [95% CI, -17.31 to 21.32] milliseconds; P = .93; 2-day, patients with COVID-19: 17.40 [95% CI, 12.65 to 22.16] milliseconds; P < .001; patients without COVID-19: 0.11 [95% CI, -12.60 to 12.81] milliseconds; P = .99). COVID-19 infection was independently associated with a modeled mean 27.32 (95% CI, 4.63-43.21) millisecond increase in QTc at 5 days compared with COVID-19-negative status (mean QTc, with COVID-19: 450.45 [95% CI, 441.6 to 459.3] milliseconds; without COVID-19: 423.13 [95% CI, 403.25 to 443.01] milliseconds; P = .01). More patients with COVID-19 not receiving hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin had QTc of 500 milliseconds or greater compared with patients without COVID-19 (34 of 136 [25.0%] vs 17 of 158 [10.8%], P = .002). Multivariable analysis revealed that age 80 years and older compared with those younger than 50 years (mean difference in QTc, 11.91 [SE, 4.69; 95% CI, 2.73 to 21.09]; P = .01), severe chronic kidney disease compared with no chronic kidney disease (mean difference in QTc, 12.20 [SE, 5.26; 95% CI, 1.89 to 22.51; P = .02]), elevated high-sensitivity troponin levels (mean difference in QTc, 5.05 [SE, 1.19; 95% CI, 2.72 to 7.38]; P < .001), and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels (mean difference in QTc, 5.31 [SE, 2.68; 95% CI, 0.06 to 10.57]; P = .04) were associated with QTc prolongation. Torsades de pointes occurred in 1 patient (0.1%) with COVID-19. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, COVID-19 infection was independently associated with significant mean QTc prolongation at days 5 and 2 of hospitalization compared with day 0. More patients with COVID-19 had QTc of 500 milliseconds or greater compared with patients without COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Azithromycin , COVID-19 , Electrocardiography , Hydroxychloroquine , Long QT Syndrome , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Infective Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Drug Therapy, Combination/statistics & numerical data , Electrocardiography/methods , Electrocardiography/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Long QT Syndrome/epidemiology , Long QT Syndrome/virology , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
3.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147038

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1325, 2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104490

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can result in a hyperinflammatory state, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), myocardial injury, and thrombotic complications, among other sequelae. Statins, which are known to have anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties, have been studied in the setting of other viral infections, but their benefit has not been assessed in COVID-19. This is a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with COVID-19 from February 1st through May 12th, 2020 with study period ending on June 11th, 2020. Antecedent statin use was assessed using medication information available in the electronic medical record. We constructed a multivariable logistic regression model to predict the propensity of receiving statins, adjusting for baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and outpatient medications. The primary endpoint includes in-hospital mortality within 30 days. A total of 2626 patients were admitted during the study period, of whom 951 (36.2%) were antecedent statin users. Among 1296 patients (648 statin users, 648 non-statin users) identified with 1:1 propensity-score matching, statin use is significantly associated with lower odds of the primary endpoint in the propensity-matched cohort (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.36-0.62, p < 0.001). We conclude that antecedent statin use in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is associated with lower inpatient mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(1): e018476, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917839

ABSTRACT

Background Cardiovascular involvement in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is common and leads to worsened mortality. Diagnostic cardiovascular studies may be helpful for resource appropriation and identifying patients at increased risk for death. Methods and Results We analyzed 887 patients (aged 64±17 years) admitted with COVID-19 from March 1 to April 3, 2020 in New York City with 12 lead electrocardiography within 2 days of diagnosis. Demographics, comorbidities, and laboratory testing, including high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), were abstracted. At 30 days follow-up, 556 patients (63%) were living without requiring mechanical ventilation, 123 (14%) were living and required mechanical ventilation, and 203 (23%) had expired. Electrocardiography findings included atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (AF/AFL) in 46 (5%) and ST-T wave changes in 306 (38%). 27 (59%) patients with AF/AFL expired as compared to 181 (21%) of 841 with other non-life-threatening rhythms (P<0.001). Multivariable analysis incorporating age, comorbidities, AF/AFL, QRS abnormalities, and ST-T wave changes, and initial hs-cTnT ≥20 ng/L showed that increased age (HR 1.04/year), elevated hs-cTnT (HR 4.57), AF/AFL (HR 2.07), and a history of coronary artery disease (HR 1.56) and active cancer (HR 1.87) were associated with increased mortality. Conclusions Myocardial injury with hs-cTnT ≥20 ng/L, in addition to cardiac conduction perturbations, especially AF/AFL, upon hospital admission for COVID-19 infection is associated with markedly increased risk for mortality than either diagnostic abnormality alone.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Electrocardiography , Heart Rate/physiology , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Troponin T/blood , Atrial Fibrillation/blood , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
6.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 33(10): 1278-1284, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714636

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence of cardiovascular complications associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there are few data regarding the performance of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and the spectrum of echocardiographic findings in this disease. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed among adult patients admitted to a quaternary care center in New York City between March 1 and April 3, 2020. Patients were included if they underwent TTE during the hospitalization after a known positive diagnosis for COVID-19. Demographic and clinical data were obtained using chart abstraction from the electronic medical record. RESULTS: Of 749 patients, 72 (9.6%) underwent TTE following positive results on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 polymerase chain reaction testing. The most common clinical indications for TTE were concern for a major acute cardiovascular event (45.8%) and hemodynamic instability (29.2%). Although most patients had preserved biventricular function, 34.7% were found to have left ventricular ejection fractions ≤ 50%, and 13.9% had at least moderately reduced right ventricular function. Four patients had wall motion abnormalities suggestive of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Using Spearman rank correlation, there was an inverse relationship between high-sensitivity troponin T and left ventricular ejection fraction (ρ = -0.34, P = .006). Among 20 patients with prior echocardiograms, only two (10%) had new reductions in LVEF of >10%. Clinical management was changed in eight individuals (24.2%) in whom TTE was ordered for concern for acute major cardiovascular events and three (14.3%) in whom TTE was ordered for hemodynamic evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the clinical indications for use and diagnostic performance of TTE, as well as findings seen on TTE, in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. In appropriately selected patients, TTE can be an invaluable tool for guiding COVID-19 clinical management.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Heart Ventricles/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume/physiology , Ventricular Function, Left/physiology , Ventricular Function, Right/physiology , Young Adult
7.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(10): 2099-2109, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713288

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study whether combining vital signs and electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis can improve early prognostication. METHODS: This study analyzed 1258 adults with coronavirus disease 2019 who were seen at three hospitals in New York in March and April 2020. Electrocardiograms at presentation to the emergency department were systematically read by electrophysiologists. The primary outcome was a composite of mechanical ventilation or death 48 hours from diagnosis. The prognostic value of ECG abnormalities was assessed in a model adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and vital signs. RESULTS: At 48 hours, 73 of 1258 patients (5.8%) had died and 174 of 1258 (13.8%) were alive but receiving mechanical ventilation with 277 of 1258 (22.0%) patients dying by 30 days. Early development of respiratory failure was common, with 53% of all intubations occurring within 48 hours of presentation. In a multivariable logistic regression, atrial fibrillation/flutter (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.2), right ventricular strain (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.1), and ST segment abnormalities (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 3.8) were associated with death or mechanical ventilation at 48 hours. In 108 patients without these ECG abnormalities and with normal respiratory vitals (rate <20 breaths/min and saturation >95%), only 5 (4.6%) died or required mechanical ventilation by 48 hours versus 68 of 216 patients (31.5%) having both ECG and respiratory vital sign abnormalities. CONCLUSION: The combination of abnormal respiratory vital signs and ECG findings of atrial fibrillation/flutter, right ventricular strain, or ST segment abnormalities accurately prognosticates early deterioration in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and may assist with patient triage.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Electrocardiography/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Nat Med ; 26(7): 1017-1032, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639177

ABSTRACT

Although COVID-19 is most well known for causing substantial respiratory pathology, it can also result in several extrapulmonary manifestations. These conditions include thrombotic complications, myocardial dysfunction and arrhythmia, acute coronary syndromes, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatocellular injury, hyperglycemia and ketosis, neurologic illnesses, ocular symptoms, and dermatologic complications. Given that ACE2, the entry receptor for the causative coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, is expressed in multiple extrapulmonary tissues, direct viral tissue damage is a plausible mechanism of injury. In addition, endothelial damage and thromboinflammation, dysregulation of immune responses, and maladaptation of ACE2-related pathways might all contribute to these extrapulmonary manifestations of COVID-19. Here we review the extrapulmonary organ-specific pathophysiology, presentations and management considerations for patients with COVID-19 to aid clinicians and scientists in recognizing and monitoring the spectrum of manifestations, and in developing research priorities and therapeutic strategies for all organ systems involved.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Organ Specificity , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adaptive Immunity/physiology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology , Virus Internalization
9.
Am Heart J ; 227: 74-81, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-622226

ABSTRACT

Critical care cardiology has been impacted by the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. COVID-19 causes severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, as well as several cardiovascular complications including myocarditis, venous thromboembolic disease, cardiogenic shock, and cardiac arrest. The cardiac intensive care unit is rapidly evolving as the need for critical care beds increases. Herein, we describe the changes to the cardiac intensive care unit and the evolving role of critical care cardiologists and other clinicians in the care of these complex patients affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. These include practical recommendations regarding structural and organizational changes to facilitate care of patients with COVID-19; staffing and personnel changes; and health and safety of personnel. We draw upon our own experiences at NewYork-Presbyterian Columbia University Irving Medical Center to offer insights into the unique challenges facing critical care clinicians and provide recommendations of how to address these challenges during this unprecedented time.


Subject(s)
Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Care/trends , Humans , New York City , Organizational Innovation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 66: 1-8, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599549

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The mental health toll of COVID-19 on healthcare workers (HCW) is not yet fully described. We characterized distress, coping, and preferences for support among NYC HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional web survey of physicians, advanced practice providers, residents/fellows, and nurses, conducted during a peak of inpatient admissions for COVID-19 in NYC (April 9th-April 24th 2020) at a large medical center in NYC (n = 657). RESULTS: Positive screens for psychological symptoms were common; 57% for acute stress, 48% for depressive, and 33% for anxiety symptoms. For each, a higher percent of nurses/advanced practice providers screened positive vs. attending physicians, though housestaff's rates for acute stress and depression did not differ from either. Sixty-one percent of participants reported increased sense of meaning/purpose since the COVID-19 outbreak. Physical activity/exercise was the most common coping behavior (59%), and access to an individual therapist with online self-guided counseling (33%) garnered the most interest. CONCLUSIONS: NYC HCWs, especially nurses and advanced practice providers, are experiencing COVID-19-related psychological distress. Participants reported using empirically-supported coping behaviors, and endorsed indicators of resilience, but they also reported interest in additional wellness resources. Programs developed to mitigate stress among HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic should integrate HCW preferences.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Patient Preference/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychological Distress , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
11.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 75(23): 2974-2983, 2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-547081

ABSTRACT

Patients with structural heart disease are at increased risk of adverse outcomes from the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) due to advanced age and comorbidity. In the midst of a global pandemic of a novel infectious disease, reality-based considerations comprise an important starting point for formulating clinical management pathways. The aims of these "crisis-driven" recommendations are: 1) to ensure appropriate and timely treatment of structural heart disease patients; 2) to minimize the risk of COVID-19 exposure to patients and health care workers; and 3) to limit resource utilization under conditions of constraint. Although the degree of disruption to usual practice will vary across the United States and elsewhere, we hope that early experiences from a heart team operating in the current global epicenter of COVID-19 may prove useful for others adapting their practice in advance of local surges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Pathways , Heart Diseases , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/trends , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/surgery , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Circ Heart Fail ; 13(7): e007220, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-546317

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019, otherwise known as COVID-19, is a global pandemic with primary respiratory manifestations in those who are symptomatic. It has spread to >187 countries with a rapidly growing number of affected patients. Underlying cardiovascular disease is associated with more severe manifestations of COVID-19 and higher rates of mortality. COVID-19 can have both primary (arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, and myocarditis) and secondary (myocardial injury/biomarker elevation and heart failure) cardiac involvement. In severe cases, profound circulatory failure can result. This review discusses the presentation and management of patients with severe cardiac complications of COVID-19 disease, with an emphasis on a Heart-Lung team approach in patient management. Furthermore, it focuses on the use of and indications for acute mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic and/or mixed shock.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Myocarditis/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Acute Coronary Syndrome/complications , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/chemically induced , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/complications , Azithromycin/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart-Assist Devices , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Myocarditis/complications , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy , Thromboembolism
13.
Circulation ; 141(20): 1648-1655, 2020 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-437727

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic affecting 185 countries and >3 000 000 patients worldwide as of April 28, 2020. COVID-19 is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which invades cells through the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor. Among patients with COVID-19, there is a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, and >7% of patients experience myocardial injury from the infection (22% of critically ill patients). Although angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 serves as the portal for infection, the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers requires further investigation. COVID-19 poses a challenge for heart transplantation, affecting donor selection, immunosuppression, and posttransplant management. There are a number of promising therapies under active investigation to treat and prevent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A , Pneumonia, Viral , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Crit Pathw Cardiol ; 19(3): 105-111, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-119522

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 crisis is a global pandemic of a novel infectious disease with far-ranging public health implications. With regard to cardiac electrophysiology (EP) services, we discuss the "real-world" challenges and solutions that have been essential for efficient and successful (1) ramping down of standard clinical practice patterns and (2) pivoting of workflow processes to meet the demands of this pandemic. The aims of these recommendations are to outline: (1) essential practical steps to approaching procedures, as well as outpatient and inpatient care of EP patients, with relevant examples, (2) successful strategies to minimize exposure risk to patients and clinical staff while also balancing resource utilization, (3) challenges related to redeployment and restructuring of clinical and support staff, and (4) considerations regarding continued collaboration with clinical and administrative colleagues to implement these changes. While process changes will vary across practices and hospital systems, we believe that these experiences from 4 different EP sections in a large New York City hospital network currently based in the global epicenter of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic will prove useful for other EP practices adapting their own practices in preparation for local surges.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , Cardiac Electrophysiology , Coronavirus Infections , Hospital Restructuring , Infection Control , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/trends , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Cardiac Electrophysiology/methods , Cardiac Electrophysiology/organization & administration , Cardiac Electrophysiology/trends , Change Management , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Pathways/trends , Hospital Restructuring/methods , Hospital Restructuring/organization & administration , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , New York City , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Circulation ; 141(23): 1930-1936, 2020 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-32308
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