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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 889, 2022 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our study examines if SARS-CoV-2 infections varied by vaccination status, if an individual had previously tested positive and by neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation across the Delta and Omicron epidemic waves of SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Population cohort study using electronic health records for 2.7 M residents in Cheshire and Merseyside, England (3rd June 2021 to 1st March 2022). Our outcome variable was registered positive test for SARS-CoV-2. Explanatory variables were vaccination status, previous registered positive test and neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation. Cox regression models were used to analyse associations. RESULTS: Originally higher SARS-CoV-2 rates in the most socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods changed to being higher in the least deprived neighbourhoods from the 1st September 2021, and were inconsistent during the Omicron wave. Individuals who were fully vaccinated (two doses) were associated with fewer registered positive tests (e.g., individuals engaged in testing between 1st September and 27th November 2021-Hazards Ratio (HR) = 0.48, 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) = 0.47-0.50. Individuals with a previous registered positive test were also less likely to have a registered positive test (e.g., individuals engaged in testing between 1st September and 27th November 2021-HR = 0.16, 95% CIs = 0.15-0.18. However, the Omicron period saw smaller effect sizes for both vaccination status and previous registered positive test. CONCLUSIONS: Changing patterns of SARS-CoV-2 infections during the Delta and Omicron waves reveals a dynamic pandemic that continues to affect diverse communities in sometimes unexpected ways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Vaccination
2.
Int J Infect Dis ; 111: 333-335, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113770

ABSTRACT

This single-centre observational study demonstrated that lower cycle threshold (Ct) values (indicating higher viral loads) on admission to hospital were associated with poorer outcomes in unvaccinated, hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Demographic and outcome data were collected prospectively for all adult patients who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 on admission to the University Hospitals North Midlands NHS Trust between 1 February and 1 July 2020. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained, and a valid Ct value was determined for all patients using the Viasure reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay, validated by Public Health England, on admission to hospital. Multi-variable logistic regression results based on data from 618 individuals demonstrated a significant inverse relationship between the odds of death and Ct values (adjusted odds ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.92-0.98, P=0.001). The association remained highly significant after adjusting for known clinical risk factors for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , United Kingdom
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e063271, 2022 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117872

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 infection rarely causes hospitalisation in children and young people (CYP), but mild or asymptomatic infections are common. Persistent symptoms following infection have been reported in CYP but subsequent healthcare use is unclear. We aim to describe healthcare use in CYP following community-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection and identify those at risk of ongoing healthcare needs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use anonymised individual-level, population-scale national data linking demographics, comorbidities, primary and secondary care use and mortality between 1 January 2019 and 1 May 2022. SARS-CoV-2 test data will be linked from 1 January 2020 to 1 May 2022. Analyses will use Trusted Research Environments: OpenSAFELY in England, Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank in Wales and Early Pandemic Evaluation and Enhanced Surveillance of COVID-19 in Scotland (EAVE-II). CYP aged ≥4 and <18 years who underwent SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) testing between 1 January 2020 and 1 May 2021 and those untested CYP will be examined.The primary outcome measure is cumulative healthcare cost over 12 months following SARS-CoV-2 testing, stratified into primary or secondary care, and physical or mental healthcare. We will estimate the burden of healthcare use attributable to SARS-CoV-2 infections in the 12 months after testing using a matched cohort study of RT-PCR positive, negative or untested CYP matched on testing date, with adjustment for confounders. We will identify factors associated with higher healthcare needs in the 12 months following SARS-CoV-2 infection using an unmatched cohort of RT-PCR positive CYP. Multivariable logistic regression and machine learning approaches will identify risk factors for high healthcare use and characterise patterns of healthcare use post infection. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the South-Central Oxford C Health Research Authority Ethics Committee (13/SC/0149). Findings will be preprinted and published in peer-reviewed journals. Analysis code and code lists will be available through public GitHub repositories and OpenCodelists with meta-data via HDR-UK Innovation Gateway.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Wales/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Observational Studies as Topic
4.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(11): ofac531, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115835

ABSTRACT

Background: We conducted this study to assess the prevalence of viral coinfection in a well characterized cohort of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and to investigate the impact of coinfection on disease severity. Methods: Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction testing for endemic respiratory viruses was performed on upper respiratory tract samples from 1002 patients with COVID-19, aged <1 year to 102 years old, recruited to the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infections Consortium WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK study. Comprehensive demographic, clinical, and outcome data were collected prospectively up to 28 days post discharge. Results: A coinfecting virus was detected in 20 (2.0%) participants. Multivariable analysis revealed no significant risk factors for coinfection, although this may be due to rarity of coinfection. Likewise, ordinal logistic regression analysis did not demonstrate a significant association between coinfection and increased disease severity. Conclusions: Viral coinfection was rare among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the United Kingdom during the first 18 months of the pandemic. With unbiased prospective sampling, we found no evidence of an association between viral coinfection and disease severity. Public health interventions disrupted normal seasonal transmission of respiratory viruses; relaxation of these measures mean it will be important to monitor the prevalence and impact of respiratory viral coinfections going forward.

6.
Ann Neurol ; 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of treatment with dexamethasone, remdesivir or both on neurological complications in acute coronavirus diease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We used observational data from the International Severe Acute and emerging Respiratory Infection Consortium World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Characterization Protocol, United Kingdom. Hospital inpatients aged ≥18 years with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection admitted between January 31, 2020, and June 29, 2021, were included. Treatment allocation was non-blinded and performed by reporting clinicians. A propensity scoring methodology was used to minimize confounding. Treatment with remdesivir, dexamethasone, or both was assessed against the standard of care. The primary outcome was a neurological complication occurring at the point of death, discharge, or resolution of the COVID-19 clinical episode. RESULTS: Out of 89,297 hospital inpatients, 64,088 had severe COVID-19 and 25,209 had non-hypoxic COVID-19. Neurological complications developed in 4.8% and 4.5%, respectively. In both groups, neurological complications were associated with increased mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, worse self-care on discharge, and time to recovery. In patients with severe COVID-19, treatment with dexamethasone (n = 21,129), remdesivir (n = 1,428), and both combined (n = 10,846) were associated with a lower frequency of neurological complications: OR = 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.83), OR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.51-0.90), and OR = 0.54 (95% CI = 0.47-0.61), respectively. In patients with non-hypoxic COVID-19, dexamethasone (n = 2,580) was associated with less neurological complications (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97), whereas the dexamethasone/remdesivir combination (n = 460) showed a similar trend (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.31-1.15). INTERPRETATION: Treatment with dexamethasone, remdesivir, or both in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 was associated with a lower frequency of neurological complications in an additive manner, such that the greatest benefit was observed in patients who received both drugs together. ANN NEUROL 2022.

7.
Elife ; 112022 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056253

ABSTRACT

Background: Whilst timely clinical characterisation of infections caused by novel SARS-CoV-2 variants is necessary for evidence-based policy response, individual-level data on infecting variants are typically only available for a minority of patients and settings. Methods: Here, we propose an innovative approach to study changes in COVID-19 hospital presentation and outcomes after the Omicron variant emergence using publicly available population-level data on variant relative frequency to infer SARS-CoV-2 variants likely responsible for clinical cases. We apply this method to data collected by a large international clinical consortium before and after the emergence of the Omicron variant in different countries. Results: Our analysis, that includes more than 100,000 patients from 28 countries, suggests that in many settings patients hospitalised with Omicron variant infection less often presented with commonly reported symptoms compared to patients infected with pre-Omicron variants. Patients with COVID-19 admitted to hospital after Omicron variant emergence had lower mortality compared to patients admitted during the period when Omicron variant was responsible for only a minority of infections (odds ratio in a mixed-effects logistic regression adjusted for likely confounders, 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.61-0.75]). Qualitatively similar findings were observed in sensitivity analyses with different assumptions on population-level Omicron variant relative frequencies, and in analyses using available individual-level data on infecting variant for a subset of the study population. Conclusions: Although clinical studies with matching viral genomic information should remain a priority, our approach combining publicly available data on variant frequency and a multi-country clinical characterisation dataset with more than 100,000 records allowed analysis of data from a wide range of settings and novel insights on real-world heterogeneity of COVID-19 presentation and clinical outcome. Funding: Bronner P. Gonçalves, Peter Horby, Gail Carson, Piero L. Olliaro, Valeria Balan, Barbara Wanjiru Citarella, and research costs were supported by the UK Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) and Wellcome [215091/Z/18/Z, 222410/Z/21/Z, 225288/Z/22/Z]; and Janice Caoili and Madiha Hashmi were supported by the UK FCDO and Wellcome [222048/Z/20/Z]. Peter Horby, Gail Carson, Piero L. Olliaro, Kalynn Kennon and Joaquin Baruch were supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation [OPP1209135]; Laura Merson was supported by University of Oxford's COVID-19 Research Response Fund - with thanks to its donors for their philanthropic support. Matthew Hall was supported by a Li Ka Shing Foundation award to Christophe Fraser. Moritz U.G. Kraemer was supported by the Branco Weiss Fellowship, Google.org, the Oxford Martin School, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the European Union Horizon 2020 project MOOD (#874850). The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Commission. Contributions from Srinivas Murthy, Asgar Rishu, Rob Fowler, James Joshua Douglas, François Martin Carrier were supported by CIHR Coronavirus Rapid Research Funding Opportunity OV2170359 and coordinated out of Sunnybrook Research Institute. Contributions from Evert-Jan Wils and David S.Y. Ong were supported by a grant from foundation Bevordering Onderzoek Franciscus; and Andrea Angheben by the Italian Ministry of Health "Fondi Ricerca corrente-L1P6" to IRCCS Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria. The data contributions of J.Kenneth Baillie, Malcolm G. Semple, and Ewen M. Harrison were supported by grants from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR; award CO-CIN-01), the Medical Research Council (MRC; grant MC_PC_19059), and by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) (award 200907), NIHR HPRU in Respiratory Infections at Imperial College London with PHE (award 200927), Liverpool Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (grant C18616/A25153), NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Imperial College London (award IS-BRC-1215-20013), and NIHR Clinical Research Network providing infrastructure support. All funders of the ISARIC Clinical Characterisation Group are listed in the appendix.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
8.
Immunology ; 2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052591

ABSTRACT

Complement, a critical defence against pathogens, has been implicated as a driver of pathology in COVID-19. Complement activation products are detected in plasma and tissues and complement blockade is considered for therapy. To delineate roles of complement in immunopathogenesis, we undertook the largest comprehensive study of complement in COVID-19 to date, comprehensive profiling of 16 complement biomarkers, including key components, regulators and activation products, in 966 plasma samples from 682 hospitalized COVID-19 patients collected across the hospitalization period as part of the UK ISARIC4C (International Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium) study. Unsupervised clustering of complement biomarkers mapped to disease severity and supervised machine learning identified marker sets in early samples that predicted peak severity. Compared to healthy controls, complement proteins and activation products (Ba, iC3b, terminal complement complex) were significantly altered in COVID-19 admission samples in all severity groups. Elevated alternative pathway activation markers (Ba and iC3b) and decreased alternative pathway regulator (properdin) in admission samples were associated with more severe disease and risk of death. Levels of most complement biomarkers were reduced in severe disease, consistent with consumption and tissue deposition. Latent class mixed modelling and cumulative incidence analysis identified the trajectory of increase of Ba to be a strong predictor of peak COVID-19 disease severity and death. The data demonstrate that early-onset, uncontrolled activation of complement, driven by sustained and progressive amplification through the alternative pathway amplification loop is a ubiquitous feature of COVID-19, further exacerbated in severe disease. These findings provide novel insights into COVID-19 immunopathogenesis and inform strategies for therapeutic intervention.

9.
Baruch, Joaquin, Rojek, Amanda, Kartsonaki, Christiana, Vijayaraghavan, Bharath K. T.; Gonçalves, Bronner P.; Pritchard, Mark G.; Merson, Laura, Dunning, Jake, Hall, Matthew, Sigfrid, Louise, Citarella, Barbara W.; Murthy, Srinivas, Yeabah, Trokon O.; Olliaro, Piero, Abbas, Ali, Abdukahil, Sheryl Ann, Abdulkadir, Nurul Najmee, Abe, Ryuzo, Abel, Laurent, Absil, Lara, Acharya, Subhash, Acker, Andrew, Adam, Elisabeth, Adrião, Diana, Al Ageel, Saleh, Ahmed, Shakeel, Ainscough, Kate, Airlangga, Eka, Aisa, Tharwat, Hssain, Ali Ait, Tamlihat, Younes Ait, Akimoto, Takako, Akmal, Ernita, Al Qasim, Eman, Alalqam, Razi, Alberti, Angela, Al‐dabbous, Tala, Alegesan, Senthilkumar, Alegre, Cynthia, Alessi, Marta, Alex, Beatrice, Alexandre, Kévin, Al‐Fares, Abdulrahman, Alfoudri, Huda, Ali, Imran, Ali, Adam, Shah, Naseem Ali, Alidjnou, Kazali Enagnon, Aliudin, Jeffrey, Alkhafajee, Qabas, Allavena, Clotilde, Allou, Nathalie, Altaf, Aneela, Alves, João, Alves, Rita, Alves, João Melo, Amaral, Maria, Amira, Nur, Ampaw, Phoebe, Andini, Roberto, Andréjak, Claire, Angheben, Andrea, Angoulvant, François, Ansart, Séverine, Anthonidass, Sivanesen, Antonelli, Massimo, de Brito, Carlos Alexandre Antunes, Apriyana, Ardiyan, Arabi, Yaseen, Aragao, Irene, Araujo, Carolline, Arcadipane, Antonio, Archambault, Patrick, Arenz, Lukas, Arlet, Jean‐Benoît, Arora, Lovkesh, Arora, Rakesh, Artaud‐Macari, Elise, Aryal, Diptesh, Asensio, Angel, Ashraf, Muhammad, Asif, Namra, Asim, Mohammad, Assie, Jean Baptiste, Asyraf, Amirul, Atique, Anika, Attanyake, A. M. Udara Lakshan, Auchabie, Johann, Aumaitre, Hugues, Auvet, Adrien, Axelsen, Eyvind W.; Azemar, Laurène, Azoulay, Cecile, Bach, Benjamin, Bachelet, Delphine, Badr, Claudine, Bævre‐Jensen, Roar, Baig, Nadia, Baillie, J. Kenneth, Baird, J. Kevin, Bak, Erica, Bakakos, Agamemnon, Bakar, Nazreen Abu, Bal, Andriy, Balakrishnan, Mohanaprasanth, Balan, Valeria, Bani‐Sadr, Firouzé, Barbalho, Renata, Barbosa, Nicholas Yuri, Barclay, Wendy S.; Barnett, Saef Umar, Barnikel, Michaela, Barrasa, Helena, Barrelet, Audrey, Barrigoto, Cleide, Bartoli, Marie, Baruch, Joaquín, Bashir, Mustehan, Basmaci, Romain, Basri, Muhammad Fadhli Hassin, Battaglini, Denise, Bauer, Jules, Rincon, Diego Fernando Bautista, Dow, Denisse Bazan, Beane, Abigail, Bedossa, Alexandra, Bee, Ker Hong, Begum, Husna, Behilill, Sylvie, Beishuizen, Albertus, Beljantsev, Aleksandr, Bellemare, David, Beltrame, Anna, Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim, Beluze, Marine, Benech, Nicolas, Benjiman, Lionel Eric, Benkerrou, Dehbia, Bennett, Suzanne, Bento, Luís, Berdal, Jan‐Erik, Bergeaud, Delphine, Bergin, Hazel, Sobrino, José Luis Bernal, Bertoli, Giulia, Bertolino, Lorenzo, Bessis, Simon, Bevilcaqua, Sybille, Bezulier, Karine, Bhatt, Amar, Bhavsar, Krishna, Bianco, Claudia, Bidin, Farah Nadiah, Singh, Moirangthem Bikram, Humaid, Felwa Bin, Kamarudin, Mohd Nazlin Bin, Bissuel, François, Bitker, Laurent, Bitton, Jonathan, Blanco‐Schweizer, Pablo, Blier, Catherine, Bloos, Frank, Blot, Mathieu, Boccia, Filomena, Bodenes, Laetitia, Bogaarts, Alice, Bogaert, Debby, Boivin, Anne‐Hélène, Bolze, Pierre‐Adrien, Bompart, François, Bonfasius, Aurelius, Borges, Diogo, Borie, Raphaël, Bosse, Hans Martin, Botelho‐Nevers, Elisabeth, Bouadma, Lila, Bouchaud, Olivier, Bouchez, Sabelline, Bouhmani, Dounia, Bouhour, Damien, Bouiller, Kévin, Bouillet, Laurence, Bouisse, Camile, Boureau, Anne‐Sophie, Bourke, John, Bouscambert, Maude, Bousquet, Aurore, Bouziotis, Jason, Boxma, Bianca, Boyer‐Besseyre, Marielle, Boylan, Maria, Bozza, Fernando Augusto, Braconnier, Axelle, Braga, Cynthia, Brandenburger, Timo, Monteiro, Filipa Brás, Brazzi, Luca, Breen, Patrick, Breen, Dorothy, Breen, Patrick, Brickell, Kathy, Browne, Shaunagh, Browne, Alex, Brozzi, Nicolas, Brunvoll, Sonja Hjellegjerde, Brusse‐Keizer, Marjolein, Buchtele, Nina, Buesaquillo, Christian, Bugaeva, Polina, Buisson, Marielle, Buonsenso, Danilo, Burhan, Erlina, Burrell, Aidan, Bustos, Ingrid G.; Butnaru, Denis, Cabie, André, Cabral, Susana, Caceres, Eder, Cadoz, Cyril, Calligy, Kate, Calvache, Jose Andres, Camões, João, Campana, Valentine, Campbell, Paul, Campisi, Josie, Canepa, Cecilia, Cantero, Mireia, Caraux‐Paz, Pauline, Cárcel, Sheila, Cardellino, Chiara Simona, Cardoso, Sofia, Cardoso, Filipe, Cardoso, Filipa, Cardoso, Nelson, Carelli, Simone, Carlier, Nicolas, Carmoi, Thierry, Carney, Gayle, Carqueja, Inês, Carret, Marie‐Christine, Carrier, François Martin, Carroll, Ida, Carson, Gail, Casanova, Maire‐Laure, Cascão, Mariana, Casey, Siobhan, Casimiro, José, Cassandra, Bailey, Castañeda, Silvia, Castanheira, Nidyanara, Castor‐Alexandre, Guylaine, Castrillón, Henry, Castro, Ivo, Catarino, Ana, Catherine, François‐Xavier, Cattaneo, Paolo, Cavalin, Roberta, Cavalli, Giulio Giovanni, Cavayas, Alexandros, Ceccato, Adrian, Cervantes‐Gonzalez, Minerva, Chair, Anissa, Chakveatze, Catherine, Chan, Adrienne, Chand, Meera, Auger, Christelle Chantalat, Chapplain, Jean‐Marc, Chas, Julie, Chatterjee, Allegra, Chaudry, Mobin, Iñiguez, Jonathan Samuel Chávez, Chen, Anjellica, Chen, Yih‐Sharng, Cheng, Matthew Pellan, Cheret, Antoine, Chiarabini, Thibault, Chica, Julian, Chidambaram, Suresh Kumar, Tho, Leong Chin, Chirouze, Catherine, Chiumello, Davide, Cho, Sung‐Min, Cholley, Bernard, Chopin, Marie‐Charlotte, Chow, Ting Soo, Chow, Yock Ping, Chua, Jonathan, Chua, Hiu Jian, Cidade, Jose Pedro, Herreros, José Miguel Cisneros, Citarella, Barbara Wanjiru, Ciullo, Anna, Clarke, Jennifer, Clarke, Emma, Granado, Rolando Claure‐Del, Clohisey, Sara, Cobb, Perren J.; Codan, Cassidy, Cody, Caitriona, Coelho, Alexandra, Coles, Megan, Colin, Gwenhaël, Collins, Michael, Colombo, Sebastiano Maria, Combs, Pamela, Connor, Marie, Conrad, Anne, Contreras, Sofía, Conway, Elaine, Cooke, Graham S.; Copland, Mary, Cordel, Hugues, Corley, Amanda, Cornelis, Sabine, Cornet, Alexander Daniel, Corpuz, Arianne Joy, Cortegiani, Andrea, Corvaisier, Grégory, Costigan, Emma, Couffignal, Camille, Couffin‐Cadiergues, Sandrine, Courtois, Roxane, Cousse, Stéphanie, Cregan, Rachel, Croonen, Sabine, Crowl, Gloria, Crump, Jonathan, Cruz, Claudina, Bermúdez, Juan Luis Cruz, Rojo, Jaime Cruz, Csete, Marc, Cullen, Ailbhe, Cummings, Matthew, Curley, Gerard, Curlier, Elodie, Curran, Colleen, Custodio, Paula, da Silva Filipe, Ana, Da Silveira, Charlene, Dabaliz, Al‐Awwab, Dagens, Andrew, Dahl, John Arne, Dahly, Darren, Dalton, Heidi, Dalton, Jo, Daly, Seamus, Daneman, Nick, Daniel, Corinne, Dankwa, Emmanuelle A.; Dantas, Jorge, D'Aragon, Frédérick, de Loughry, Gillian, de Mendoza, Diego, De Montmollin, Etienne, de Oliveira França, Rafael Freitas, de Pinho Oliveira, Ana Isabel, De Rosa, Rosanna, De Rose, Cristina, de Silva, Thushan, de Vries, Peter, Deacon, Jillian, Dean, David, Debard, Alexa, Debray, Marie‐Pierre, DeCastro, Nathalie, Dechert, William, Deconninck, Lauren, Decours, Romain, Defous, Eve, Delacroix, Isabelle, Delaveuve, Eric, Delavigne, Karen, Delfos, Nathalie M.; Deligiannis, Ionna, Dell'Amore, Andrea, Delmas, Christelle, Delobel, Pierre, Delsing, Corine, Demonchy, Elisa, Denis, Emmanuelle, Deplanque, Dominique, Depuydt, Pieter, Desai, Mehul, Descamps, Diane, Desvallées, Mathilde, Dewayanti, Santi, Dhanger, Pathik, Diallo, Alpha, Diamantis, Sylvain, Dias, André, Diaz, Juan Jose, Diaz, Priscila, Diaz, Rodrigo, Didier, Kévin, Diehl, Jean‐Luc, Dieperink, Wim, Dimet, Jérôme, Dinot, Vincent, Diop, Fara, Diouf, Alphonsine, Dishon, Yael, Djossou, Félix, Docherty, Annemarie B.; Doherty, Helen, Dondorp, Arjen M.; Donnelly, Maria, Donnelly, Christl A.; Donohue, Sean, Donohue, Yoann, Donohue, Chloe, Doran, Peter, Dorival, Céline, D'Ortenzio, Eric, Douglas, James Joshua, Douma, Renee, Dournon, Nathalie, Downer, Triona, Downey, Joanne, Downing, Mark, Drake, Tom, Driscoll, Aoife, Dryden, Murray, Fonseca, Claudio Duarte, Dubee, Vincent, Dubos, François, Ducancelle, Alexandre, Duculan, Toni, Dudman, Susanne, Duggal, Abhijit, Dunand, Paul, Dunning, Jake, Duplaix, Mathilde, Durante‐Mangoni, Emanuele, Durham, Lucian, Dussol, Bertrand, Duthoit, Juliette, Duval, Xavier, Dyrhol‐Riise, Anne Margarita, Ean, Sim Choon, Echeverria‐Villalobos, Marco, Egan, Siobhan, Eggesbø, Linn Margrete, Eira, Carla, El Sanharawi, Mohammed, Elapavaluru, Subbarao, Elharrar, Brigitte, Ellerbroek, Jacobien, Ellingjord‐Dale, Merete, Eloy, Philippine, Elshazly, Tarek, Elyazar, Iqbal, Enderle, Isabelle, Endo, Tomoyuki, Eng, Chan Chee, Engelmann, Ilka, Enouf, Vincent, Epaulard, Olivier, Escher, Martina, Esperatti, Mariano, Esperou, Hélène, Esposito‐Farese, Marina, Estevão, João, Etienne, Manuel, Ettalhaoui, Nadia, Everding, Anna Greti, Evers, Mirjam, Fabre, Marc, Fabre, Isabelle, Faheem, Amna, Fahy, Arabella, Fairfield, Cameron J.; Fakar, Zul, Fareed, Komal, Faria, Pedro, Farooq, Ahmed, Fateena, Hanan, Fatoni, Arie Zainul, Faure, Karine, Favory, Raphaël, Fayed, Mohamed, Feely, Niamh, Feeney, Laura, Fernandes, Jorge, Fernandes, Marília Andreia, Fernandes, Susana, Ferrand, François‐Xavier, Devouge, Eglantine Ferrand, Ferrão, Joana, Ferraz, Mário, Ferreira, Sílvia, Ferreira, Isabel, Ferreira, Benigno, Ferrer‐Roca, Ricard, Ferriere, Nicolas, Ficko, Céline, Figueiredo‐Mello, Claudia, Finlayson, William, Fiorda, Juan, Flament, Thomas, Flateau, Clara, Fletcher, Tom, Florio, Letizia Lucia, Flynn, Deirdre, Foley, Claire, Foley, Jean, Fomin, Victor, Fonseca, Tatiana, Fontela, Patricia, Forsyth, Simon, Foster, Denise, Foti, Giuseppe, Fourn, Erwan, Fowler, Robert A.; Fraher, Marianne, Franch‐Llasat, Diego, Fraser, John F.; Fraser, Christophe, Freire, Marcela Vieira, Ribeiro, Ana Freitas, Friedrich, Caren, Fry, Stéphanie, Fuentes, Nora, Fukuda, Masahiro, Argin, G.; Gaborieau, Valérie, Gaci, Rostane, Gagliardi, Massimo, Gagnard, Jean‐Charles, Gagneux‐Brunon, Amandine, Gaião, Sérgio, Skeie, Linda Gail, Gallagher, Phil, Gamble, Carrol, Gani, Yasmin, Garan, Arthur, Garcia, Rebekha, Barrio, Noelia García, Garcia‐Diaz, Julia, Garcia‐Gallo, Esteban, Garimella, Navya, Garot, Denis, Garrait, Valérie, Gauli, Basanta, Gault, Nathalie, Gavin, Aisling, Gavrylov, Anatoliy, Gaymard, Alexandre, Gebauer, Johannes, Geraud, Eva, Morlaes, Louis Gerbaud, Germano, Nuno, Ghisulal, Praveen Kumar, Ghosn, Jade, Giani, Marco, Gibson, Jess, Gigante, Tristan, Gilg, Morgane, Gilroy, Elaine, Giordano, Guillermo, Girvan, Michelle, Gissot, Valérie, Glikman, Daniel, Glybochko, Petr, Gnall, Eric, Goco, Geraldine, Goehringer, François, Goepel, Siri, Goffard, Jean‐Christophe, Goh, Jin Yi, Golob, Jonathan, Gomez, Kyle, Gómez‐Junyent, Joan, Gominet, Marie, Gonçalves, Bronner P.; Gonzalez, Alicia, Gordon, Patricia, Gorenne, Isabelle, Goubert, Laure, Goujard, Cécile, Goulenok, Tiphaine, Grable, Margarite, Graf, Jeronimo, Grandin, Edward Wilson, Granier, Pascal, Grasselli, Giacomo, Green, Christopher A.; Greene, Courtney, Greenhalf, William, Greffe, Segolène, Grieco, Domenico Luca, Griffee, Matthew, Griffiths, Fiona, Grigoras, Ioana, Groenendijk, Albert, Lordemann, Anja Grosse, Gruner, Heidi, Gu, Yusing, Guedj, Jérémie, Guego, Martin, Guellec, Dewi, Guerguerian, Anne‐Marie, Guerreiro, Daniela, Guery, Romain, Guillaumot, Anne, Guilleminault, Laurent, Guimarães de Castro, Maisa, Guimard, Thomas, Haalboom, Marieke, Haber, Daniel, Habraken, Hannah, Hachemi, Ali, Hackmann, Amy, Hadri, Nadir, Haidri, Fakhir, Hakak, Sheeba, Hall, Adam, Hall, Matthew, Halpin, Sophie, Hameed, Jawad, Hamer, Ansley, Hamers, Raph L.; Hamidfar, Rebecca, Hammarström, Bato, Hammond, Terese, Han, Lim Yuen, Haniffa, Rashan, Hao, Kok Wei, Hardwick, Hayley, Harrison, Ewen M.; Harrison, Janet, Harrison, Samuel Bernard Ekow, Hartman, Alan, Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz, Hashmi, Junaid, Hayat, Muhammad, Hayes, Ailbhe, Hays, Leanne, Heerman, Jan, Heggelund, Lars, Hendry, Ross, Hennessy, Martina, Henriquez‐Trujillo, Aquiles, Hentzien, Maxime, Hernandez‐Montfort, Jaime, Hershey, Andrew, Hesstvedt, Liv, Hidayah, Astarini, Higgins, Eibhilin, Higgins, Dawn, Higgins, Rupert, Hinchion, Rita, Hinton, Samuel, Hiraiwa, Hiroaki, Hirkani, Haider, Hitoto, Hikombo, Ho, Yi Bin, Ho, Antonia, Hoctin, Alexandre, Hoffmann, Isabelle, Hoh, Wei Han, Hoiting, Oscar, Holt, Rebecca, Holter, Jan Cato, Horby, Peter, Horcajada, Juan Pablo, Hoshino, Koji, Houas, Ikram, Hough, Catherine L.; Houltham, Stuart, Hsu, Jimmy Ming‐Yang, Hulot, Jean‐Sébastien, Huo, Stella, Hurd, Abby, Hussain, Iqbal, Ijaz, Samreen, Illes, Hajnal‐Gabriela, Imbert, Patrick, Imran, Mohammad, Sikander, Rana Imran, Imtiaz, Aftab, Inácio, Hugo, Dominguez, Carmen Infante, Ing, Yun Sii, Iosifidis, Elias, Ippolito, Mariachiara, Isgett, Sarah, Isidoro, Tiago, Ismail, Nadiah, Isnard, Margaux, Istre, Mette Stausland, Itai, Junji, Ivulich, Daniel, Jaafar, Danielle, Jaafoura, Salma, Jabot, Julien, Jackson, Clare, Jamieson, Nina, Jaquet, Pierre, Jaud‐Fischer, Coline, Jaureguiberry, Stéphane, Jaworsky, Denise, Jego, Florence, Jelani, Anilawati Mat, Jenum, Synne, Jimbo‐Sotomayor, Ruth, Joe, Ong Yiaw, Jorge García, Ruth N.; Jørgensen, Silje Bakken, Joseph, Cédric, Joseph, Mark, Joshi, Swosti, Jourdain, Mercé, Jouvet, Philippe, Jung, Hanna, Jung, Anna, Juzar, Dafsah, Kafif, Ouifiya, Kaguelidou, Florentia, Kaisbain, Neerusha, Kaleesvran, Thavamany, Kali, Sabina, Kalicinska, Alina, Kalleberg, Karl Trygve, Kalomoiri, Smaragdi, Kamaluddin, Muhammad Aisar Ayadi, Kamaruddin, Zul Amali Che, Kamarudin, Nadiah, Kamineni, Kavita, Kandamby, Darshana Hewa, Kandel, Chris, Kang, Kong Yeow, Kanwal, Darakhshan, Karpayah, Pratap, Kartsonaki, Christiana, Kasugai, Daisuke, Kataria, Anant, Katz, Kevin, Kaur, Aasmine, Kay, Christy, Keane, Hannah, Keating, Seán, Kedia, Pulak, Kelly, Claire, Kelly, Yvelynne, Kelly, Andrea, Kelly, Niamh, Kelly, Aoife, Kelly, Sadie, Kelsey, Maeve, Kennedy, Ryan, Kennon, Kalynn, Kernan, Maeve, Kerroumi, Younes, Keshav, Sharma, Khalid, Imrana, Khalid, Osama, Khalil, Antoine, Khan, Coralie, Khan, Irfan, Khan, Quratul Ain, Khanal, Sushil, Khatak, Abid, Khawaja, Amin, Kherajani, Krish, Kho, Michelle E.; Khoo, Ryan, Khoo, Denisa, Khoo, Saye, Khoso, Nasir, Kiat, Khor How, Kida, Yuri, Kiiza, Peter, Granerud, Beathe Kiland, Kildal, Anders Benjamin, Kim, Jae Burm, Kimmoun, Antoine, Kindgen‐Milles, Detlef, King, Alexander, Kitamura, Nobuya, Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke Kjetland, Klenerman, Paul, Klont, Rob, Bekken, Gry Kloumann, Knight, Stephen R.; Kobbe, Robin, Kodippily, Chamira, Vasconcelos, Malte Kohns, Koirala, Sabin, Komatsu, Mamoru, Kosgei, Caroline, Kpangon, Arsène, Krawczyk, Karolina, Krishnan, Vinothini, Krishnan, Sudhir, Kruglova, Oksana, Kumar, Ganesh, Kumar, Deepali, Kumar, Mukesh, Vecham, Pavan Kumar, Kuriakose, Dinesh, Kurtzman, Ethan, Kutsogiannis, Demetrios, Kutsyna, Galyna, Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos, Lachatre, Marie, Lacoste, Marie, Laffey, John G.; Lagrange, Marie, Laine, Fabrice, Lairez, Olivier, Lakhey, Sanjay, Lalueza, Antonio, Lambert, Marc, Lamontagne, François, Langelot‐Richard, Marie, Langlois, Vincent, Lantang, Eka Yudha, Lanza, Marina, Laouénan, Cédric, Laribi, Samira, Lariviere, Delphine, Lasry, Stéphane, Lath, Sakshi, Latif, Naveed, Launay, Odile, Laureillard, Didier, Lavie‐Badie, Yoan, Law, Andy, Lawrence, Teresa, Lawrence, Cassie, Le, Minh, Le Bihan, Clément, Le Bris, Cyril, Le Falher, Georges, Le Fevre, Lucie, Le Hingrat, Quentin, Le Maréchal, Marion, Le Mestre, Soizic, Le Moal, Gwenaël, Le Moing, Vincent, Le Nagard, Hervé, Le Turnier, Paul, Leal, Ema, Santos, Marta Leal, Lee, Heng Gee, Lee, Biing Horng, Lee, Yi Lin, Lee, Todd C.; Lee, James, Lee, Jennifer, Lee, Su Hwan, Leeming, Gary, Lefebvre, Laurent, Lefebvre, Bénédicte, Lefèvre, Benjamin, LeGac, Sylvie, Lelievre, Jean‐Daniel, Lellouche, François, Lemaignen, Adrien, Lemee, Véronique, Lemeur, Anthony, Lemmink, Gretchen, Lene, Ha Sha, Lennon, Jenny, León, Rafael, Leone, Marc, Leone, Michela, Lepiller, Quentin, Lescure, François‐Xavier, Lesens, Olivier, Lesouhaitier, Mathieu, Lester‐Grant, Amy, Levy, Yves, Levy, Bruno, Levy‐Marchal, Claire, Lewandowska, Katarzyna, L'Her, Erwan, Bassi, Gianluigi Li, Liang, Janet, Liaquat, Ali, Liegeon, Geoffrey, Lim, Kah Chuan, Lim, Wei Shen, Lima, Chantre, Lina, Lim, Lina, Bruno, Lind, Andreas, Lingad, Maja Katherine, Lingas, Guillaume, Lion‐Daolio, Sylvie, Lissauer, Samantha, Liu, Keibun, Livrozet, Marine, Lizotte, Patricia, Loforte, Antonio, Lolong, Navy, Loon, Leong Chee, Lopes, Diogo, Lopez‐Colon, Dalia, Lopez‐Revilla, Jose W.; Loschner, Anthony L.; Loubet, Paul, Loufti, Bouchra, Louis, Guillame, Lourenco, Silvia, Lovelace‐Macon, Lara, Low, Lee Lee, Lowik, Marije, Loy, Jia Shyi, Lucet, Jean Christophe, Bermejo, Carlos Lumbreras, Luna, Carlos M.; Lungu, Olguta, Luong, Liem, Luque, Nestor, Luton, Dominique, Lwin, Nilar, Lyons, Ruth, Maasikas, Olavi, Mabiala, Oryane, Machado, Moïse, Macheda, Gabriel, Madiha, Hashmi, Maestro de la Calle, Guillermo, Mahieu, Rafael, Mahy, Sophie, Maia, Ana Raquel, Maier, Lars S.; Maillet, Mylène, Maitre, Thomas, Malfertheiner, Maximilian, Malik, Nadia, Mallon, Paddy, Maltez, Fernando, Malvy, Denis, Manda, Victoria, Mandelbrot, Laurent, Manetta, Frank, Mankikian, Julie, Manning, Edmund, Manuel, Aldric, Sant'Ana Malaque, Ceila Maria, Marino, Flávio, Marino, Daniel, Markowicz, Samuel, Maroun Eid, Charbel, Marques, Ana, Marquis, Catherine, Marsh, Brian, Marsh, Laura, Marshal, Megan, Marshall, John, Martelli, Celina Turchi, Martin, Dori‐Ann, Martin, Emily, Martin‐Blondel, Guillaume, Martin‐Loeches, Ignacio, Martinot, Martin, Martin‐Quiros, Alejandro, Martins, João, Martins, Ana, Martins, Nuno, Rego, Caroline Martins, Martucci, Gennaro, Martynenko, Olga, Marwali, Eva Miranda, Marzukie, Marsilla, Maslove, David, Mason, Sabina, Masood, Sobia, Nor, Basri Mat, Matan, Moshe, Mathew, Meghena, Mathieu, Daniel, Mattei, Mathieu, Matulevics, Romans, Maulin, Laurence, Maxwell, Michael, Maynar, Javier, Mazzoni, Thierry, Evoy, Natalie Mc, Sweeney, Lisa Mc, McArthur, Colin, McArthur, Colin, McCarthy, Anne, McCarthy, Aine, McCloskey, Colin, McConnochie, Rachael, McDermott, Sherry, McDonald, Sarah E.; McElroy, Aine, McElwee, Samuel, McEneany, Victoria, McGeer, Allison, McKay, Chris, McKeown, Johnny, McLean, Kenneth A.; McNally, Paul, McNicholas, Bairbre, McPartlan, Elaine, Meaney, Edel, Mear‐Passard, Cécile, Mechlin, Maggie, Meher, Maqsood, Mehkri, Omar, Mele, Ferruccio, Melo, Luis, Memon, Kashif, Mendes, Joao Joao, Menkiti, Ogechukwu, Menon, Kusum, Mentré, France, Mentzer, Alexander J.; Mercier, Noémie, Mercier, Emmanuelle, Merckx, Antoine, Mergeay‐Fabre, Mayka, Mergler, Blake, Merson, Laura, Mesquita, António, Meta, Roberta, Metwally, Osama, Meybeck, Agnès, Meyer, Dan, Meynert, Alison M.; Meysonnier, Vanina, Meziane, Amina, Mezidi, Mehdi, Michelanglei, Céline, Michelet, Isabelle, Mihelis, Efstathia, Mihnovit, Vladislav, Miranda‐Maldonado, Hugo, Misnan, Nor Arisah, Mohamed, Tahira Jamal, Mohamed, Nik Nur Eliza, Moin, Asma, Molina, David, Molinos, Elena, Molloy, Brenda, Mone, Mary, Monteiro, Agostinho, Montes, Claudia, Montrucchio, Giorgia, Moore, Shona C.; Moore, Sarah, Cely, Lina Morales, Moro, Lucia, Morton, Ben, Motherway, Catherine, Motos, Ana, Mouquet, Hugo, Perrot, Clara Mouton, Moyet, Julien, Mudara, Caroline, Mufti, Aisha Kalsoom, Muh, Ng Yong, Muhamad, Dzawani, Mullaert, Jimmy, Müller, Fredrik, Müller, Karl Erik, Munblit, Daniel, Muneeb, Syed, Munir, Nadeem, Munshi, Laveena, Murphy, Aisling, Murphy, Lorna, Murphy, Aisling, Murris, Marlène, Murthy, Srinivas, Musaab, Himed, Muvindi, Himasha, Muyandy, Gugapriyaa, Myrodia, Dimitra Melia, Mohd‐Hanafiah, Farah Nadia, Nagpal, Dave, Nagrebetsky, Alex, Narasimhan, Mangala, Narayanan, Nageswaran, Khan, Rashid Nasim, Nazerali‐Maitland, Alasdair, Neant, Nadège, Neb, Holger, Nekliudov, Nikita, Nelwan, Erni, Neto, Raul, Neumann, Emily, Ng, Pauline Yeung, Ng, Wing Yiu, Nghi, Anthony, Nguyen, Duc, Choileain, Orna Ni, Leathlobhair, Niamh Ni, Nichol, Alistair, Nitayavardhana, Prompak, Nonas, Stephanie, Noordin, Nurul Amani Mohd, Noret, Marion, Norharizam, Nurul Faten Izzati, Norman, Lisa, Notari, Alessandra, Noursadeghi, Mahdad, Nowicka, Karolina, Nowinski, Adam, Nseir, Saad, Nunez, Jose I.; Nurnaningsih, Nurnaningsih, Nusantara, Dwi Utomo, Nyamankolly, Elsa, Nygaard, Anders Benteson, Brien, Fionnuala O.; Callaghan, Annmarie O.; O'Callaghan, Annmarie, Occhipinti, Giovanna, Oconnor, Derbrenn, O'Donnell, Max, Ogston, Tawnya, Ogura, Takayuki, Oh, Tak‐Hyuk, O'Halloran, Sophie, O'Hearn, Katie, Ohshimo, Shinichiro, Oldakowska, Agnieszka, Oliveira, João, Oliveira, Larissa, Olliaro, Piero L.; Ong, Jee Yan, Ong, David S. Y.; Oosthuyzen, Wilna, Opavsky, Anne, Openshaw, Peter, Orakzai, Saijad, Orozco‐Chamorro, Claudia Milena, Ortoleva, Jamel, Osatnik, Javier, O'Shea, Linda, O'Sullivan, Miriam, Othman, Siti Zubaidah, Ouamara, Nadia, Ouissa, Rachida, Oziol, Eric, Pagadoy, Maïder, Pages, Justine, Palacios, Mario, Palacios, Amanda, Palmarini, Massimo, Panarello, Giovanna, Panda, Prasan Kumar, Paneru, Hem, Pang, Lai Hui, Panigada, Mauro, Pansu, Nathalie, Papadopoulos, Aurélie, Parke, Rachael, Parker, Melissa, Parra, Briseida, Pasha, Taha, Pasquier, Jérémie, Pastene, Bruno, Patauner, Fabian, Patel, Drashti, Pathmanathan, Mohan Dass, Patrão, Luís, Patricio, Patricia, Patrier, Juliette, Patterson, Lisa, Pattnaik, Rajyabardhan, Paul, Mical, Paul, Christelle, Paulos, Jorge, Paxton, William A.; Payen, Jean‐François, Peariasamy, Kalaiarasu, Jiménez, Miguel Pedrera, Peek, Giles J.; Peelman, Florent, Peiffer‐Smadja, Nathan, Peigne, Vincent, Pejkovska, Mare, Pelosi, Paolo, Peltan, Ithan D.; Pereira, Rui, Perez, Daniel, Periel, Luis, Perpoint, Thomas, Pesenti, Antonio, Pestre, Vincent, Petrou, Lenka, Petrovic, Michele, Petrov‐Sanchez, Ventzislava, Pettersen, Frank Olav, Peytavin, Gilles, Pharand, Scott, Picard, Walter, Picone, Olivier, de Piero, Maria, Pierobon, Carola, Piersma, Djura, Pimentel, Carlos, Pinto, Raquel, Pires, Catarina, Pironneau, Isabelle, Piroth, Lionel, Pitaloka, Ayodhia, Pius, Riinu, Plantier, Laurent, Png, Hon Shen, Poissy, Julien, Pokeerbux, Ryadh, Pokorska‐Spiewak, Maria, Poli, Sergio, Pollakis, Georgios, Ponscarme, Diane, Popielska, Jolanta, Porto, Diego Bastos, Post, Andra‐Maris, Postma, Douwe F.; Povoa, Pedro, Póvoas, Diana, Powis, Jeff, Prapa, Sofia, Preau, Sébastien, Prebensen, Christian, Preiser, Jean‐Charles, Prinssen, Anton, Pritchard, Mark G.; Priyadarshani, Gamage Dona Dilanthi, Proença, Lucia, Pudota, Sravya, Puéchal, Oriane, Semedi, Bambang Pujo, Pulicken, Mathew, Purcell, Gregory, Quesada, Luisa, Quinones‐Cardona, Vilmaris, González, Víctor Quirós, Quist‐Paulsen, Else, Quraishi, Mohammed, Rabaa, Maia, Rabaud, Christian, Rabindrarajan, Ebenezer, Rafael, Aldo, Rafiq, Marie, Rahardjani, Mutia, Rahman, Rozanah Abd, Rahman, Ahmad Kashfi Haji Ab, Rahutullah, Arsalan, Rainieri, Fernando, Rajahram, Giri Shan, Ramachandran, Pratheema, Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan, Ramli, Ahmad Afiq, Rammaert, Blandine, Ramos, Grazielle Viana, Rana, Asim, Rangappa, Rajavardhan, Ranjan, Ritika, Rapp, Christophe, Rashan, Aasiyah, Rashan, Thalha, Rasheed, Ghulam, Rasmin, Menaldi, Rätsep, Indrek, Rau, Cornelius, Ravi, Tharmini, Raza, Ali, Real, Andre, Rebaudet, Stanislas, Redl, Sarah, Reeve, Brenda, Rehman, Attaur, Reid, Liadain, Reikvam, Dag Henrik, Reis, Renato, Rello, Jordi, Remppis, Jonathan, Remy, Martine, Ren, Hongru, Renk, Hanna, Resseguier, Anne‐Sophie, Revest, Matthieu, Rewa, Oleksa, Reyes, Luis Felipe, Reyes, Tiago, Ribeiro, Maria Ines, Ricchiuto, Antonia, Richardson, David, Richardson, Denise, Richier, Laurent, Ridzuan, Siti Nurul Atikah Ahmad, Riera, Jordi, Rios, Ana L.; Rishu, Asgar, Rispal, Patrick, Risso, Karine, Nuñez, Maria Angelica Rivera, Rizer, Nicholas, Robba, Chiara, Roberto, André, Roberts, Stephanie, Robertson, David L.; Robineau, Olivier, Roche‐Campo, Ferran, Rodari, Paola, Rodeia, Simão, Abreu, Julia Rodriguez, Roessler, Bernhard, Roger, Pierre‐Marie, Roger, Claire, Roilides, Emmanuel, Rojek, Amanda, Romaru, Juliette, Roncon‐Albuquerque, Roberto, Roriz, Mélanie, Rosa‐Calatrava, Manuel, Rose, Michael, Rosenberger, Dorothea, Roslan, Nurul Hidayah Mohammad, Rossanese, Andrea, Rossetti, Matteo, Rossignol, Bénédicte, Rossignol, Patrick, Rousset, Stella, Roy, Carine, Roze, Benoît, Rusmawatiningtyas, Desy, Russell, Clark D.; Ryan, Maria, Ryan, Maeve, Ryckaert, Steffi, Holten, Aleksander Rygh, Saba, Isabela, Sadaf, Sairah, Sadat, Musharaf, Sahraei, Valla, Saint‐Gilles, Maximilien, Sakiyalak, Pranya, Salahuddin, Nawal, Salazar, Leonardo, Saleem, Jodat, Sales, Gabriele, Sallaberry, Stéphane, Salmon Gandonniere, Charlotte, Salvator, Hélène, Sanchez, Olivier, Sanchez‐Miralles, Angel, Sancho‐Shimizu, Vanessa, Sandhu, Gyan, Sandhu, Zulfiqar, Sandrine, Pierre‐François, Sandulescu, Oana, Santos, Marlene, Sarfo‐Mensah, Shirley, Banheiro, Bruno Sarmento, Sarmiento, Iam Claire E.; Sarton, Benjamine, Satya, Ankana, Satyapriya, Sree, Satyawati, Rumaisah, Saviciute, Egle, Savvidou, Parthena, Saw, Yen Tsen, Schaffer, Justin, Schermer, Tjard, Scherpereel, Arnaud, Schneider, Marion, Schroll, Stephan, Schwameis, Michael, Schwartz, Gary, Scott, Janet T.; Scott‐Brown, James, Sedillot, Nicholas, Seitz, Tamara, Selvanayagam, Jaganathan, Selvarajoo, Mageswari, Semaille, Caroline, Semple, Malcolm G.; Senian, Rasidah Bt, Senneville, Eric, Sequeira, Filipa, Sequeira, Tânia, Neto, Ary Serpa, Balazote, Pablo Serrano, Shadowitz, Ellen, Shahidan, Syamin Asyraf, Shamsah, Mohammad, Shankar, Anuraj, Sharjeel, Shaikh, Sharma, Pratima, Shaw, Catherine A.; Shaw, Victoria, Sheharyar, Ashraf, Shetty, Rohan, Shetty, Rajesh Mohan, Shi, Haixia, Shiekh, Mohiuddin, Shime, Nobuaki, Shimizu, Keiki, Shrapnel, Sally, Shrestha, Pramesh Sundar, Shrestha, Shubha Kalyan, Shum, Hoi Ping, Mohammed, Nassima Si, Siang, Ng Yong, Sibiude, Jeanne, Siddiqui, Atif, Sigfrid, Louise, Sillaots, Piret, Silva, Catarina, Silva, Rogério, Silva, Maria Joao, Heng, Benedict Sim Lim, Sin, Wai Ching, Sinatti, Dario, Singh, Punam, Singh, Budha Charan, Sitompul, Pompini Agustina, Sivam, Karisha, Skogen, Vegard, Smith, Sue, Smood, Benjamin, Smyth, Coilin, Smyth, Michelle, Snacken, Morgane, So, Dominic, Soh, Tze Vee, Solberg, Lene Bergendal, Solomon, Joshua, Solomon, Tom, Somers, Emily, Sommet, Agnès, Song, Rima, Song, Myung Jin, Song, Tae, Chia, Jack Song, Sonntagbauer, Michael, Soom, Azlan Mat, Søraas, Arne, Søraas, Camilla Lund, Sotto, Alberto, Soum, Edouard, Sousa, Marta, Sousa, Ana Chora, Uva, Maria Sousa, Souza‐Dantas, Vicente, Sperry, Alexandra, Spinuzza, Elisabetta, Darshana, B. P. Sanka Ruwan Sri, Sriskandan, Shiranee, Stabler, Sarah, Staudinger, Thomas, Stecher, Stephanie‐Susanne, Steinsvik, Trude, Stienstra, Ymkje, Stiksrud, Birgitte, Stolz, Eva, Stone, Amy, Streinu‐Cercel, Adrian, Streinu‐Cercel, Anca, Stuart, David, Stuart, Ami, Subekti, Decy, Suen, Gabriel, Suen, Jacky Y.; Sultana, Asfia, Summers, Charlotte, Supic, Dubravka, Suppiah, Deepashankari, Surovcová, Magdalena, Suwarti, Suwarti, Svistunov, Andrey, Syahrin, Sarah, Syrigos, Konstantinos, Sztajnbok, Jaques, Szuldrzynski, Konstanty, Tabrizi, Shirin, Taccone, Fabio S.; Tagherset, Lysa, Taib, Shahdattul Mawarni, Talarek, Ewa, Taleb, Sara, Talsma, Jelmer, Tamisier, Renaud, Tampubolon, Maria Lawrensia, Tan, Kim Keat, Tan, Yan Chyi, Tanaka, Taku, Tanaka, Hiroyuki, Taniguchi, Hayato, Taqdees, Huda, Taqi, Arshad, Tardivon, Coralie, Tattevin, Pierre, Taufik, M. Azhari, Tawfik, Hassan, Tedder, Richard S.; Tee, Tze Yuan, Teixeira, João, Tejada, Sofia, Tellier, Marie‐Capucine, Teoh, Sze Kye, Teotonio, Vanessa, Téoulé, François, Terpstra, Pleun, Terrier, Olivier, Terzi, Nicolas, Tessier‐Grenier, Hubert, Tey, Adrian, Thabit, Alif Adlan Mohd, Thakur, Anand, Tham, Zhang Duan, Thangavelu, Suvintheran, Thibault, Vincent, Thiberville, Simon‐Djamel, Thill, Benoît, Thirumanickam, Jananee, Thompson, Shaun, Thomson, Emma C.; Thurai, Surain Raaj Thanga, Thwaites, Ryan S.; Tierney, Paul, Tieroshyn, Vadim, Timashev, Peter S.; Timsit, Jean‐François, Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar Tirupakuzhi, Tissot, Noémie, Toh, Jordan Zhien Yang, Toki, Maria, Tonby, Kristian, Tonnii, Sia Loong, Torres, Margarida, Torres, Antoni, Santos‐Olmo, Rosario Maria Torres, Torres‐Zevallos, Hernando, Towers, Michael, Trapani, Tony, Treoux, Théo, Tromeur, Cécile, Trontzas, Ioannis, Trouillon, Tiffany, Truong, Jeanne, Tual, Christelle, Tubiana, Sarah, Tuite, Helen, Turmel, Jean‐Marie, Turtle, Lance C. W.; Tveita, Anders, Twardowski, Pawel, Uchiyama, Makoto, Udayanga, P. G. Ishara, Udy, Andrew, Ullrich, Roman, Uribe, Alberto, Usman, Asad.
Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2019369

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Case definitions are used to guide clinical practice, surveillance and research protocols. However, how they identify COVID-19-hospitalised patients is not fully understood. We analysed the proportion of hospitalised patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, in the ISARIC prospective cohort study database, meeting widely used case definitions. Methods: Patients were assessed using the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), World Health Organization (WHO) and UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) case definitions by age, region and time. Case fatality ratios (CFRs) and symptoms of those who did and who did not meet the case definitions were evaluated. Patients with incomplete data and non-laboratory-confirmed test result were excluded. Results: A total of 263,218 of the patients (42%) in the ISARIC database were included. Most patients (90.4%) were from Europe arid Central Asia. The proportions of patients meeting the case definitions were 56.8% (WHO), 74.4% (UKHSA), 81.6% (ECDC) and 82.3% (CDC). For each case definition, patients at the extremes of age distribution met the criteria less frequently than those aged 30 to 70 years;geographical and time variations were also observed. Estimated CFRs were similar for the patients who met the case definitions. However, when more patients did riot meet the case definition, the CFR increased. Conclusions: The performance of case definitions might be different in different regions and may change over time. Similarly concerning is the fact that older patients often did not meet case definitions, risking delayed medical care. While epidemiologists must balance their analytics with field applicability, ongoing revision of case definitions is necessary to improve patient care through early diagnosis and limit potential nosocomial spread.

11.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 22(8): 1153-1162, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cases of human monkeypox are rarely seen outside of west and central Africa. There are few data regarding viral kinetics or the duration of viral shedding and no licensed treatments. Two oral drugs, brincidofovir and tecovirimat, have been approved for treatment of smallpox and have demonstrated efficacy against monkeypox in animals. Our aim was to describe the longitudinal clinical course of monkeypox in a high-income setting, coupled with viral dynamics, and any adverse events related to novel antiviral therapies. METHODS: In this retrospective observational study, we report the clinical features, longitudinal virological findings, and response to off-label antivirals in seven patients with monkeypox who were diagnosed in the UK between 2018 and 2021, identified through retrospective case-note review. This study included all patients who were managed in dedicated high consequence infectious diseases (HCID) centres in Liverpool, London, and Newcastle, coordinated via a national HCID network. FINDINGS: We reviewed all cases since the inception of the HCID (airborne) network between Aug 15, 2018, and Sept 10, 2021, identifying seven patients. Of the seven patients, four were men and three were women. Three acquired monkeypox in the UK: one patient was a health-care worker who acquired the virus nosocomially, and one patient who acquired the virus abroad transmitted it to an adult and child within their household cluster. Notable disease features included viraemia, prolonged monkeypox virus DNA detection in upper respiratory tract swabs, reactive low mood, and one patient had a monkeypox virus PCR-positive deep tissue abscess. Five patients spent more than 3 weeks (range 22-39 days) in isolation due to prolonged PCR positivity. Three patients were treated with brincidofovir (200 mg once a week orally), all of whom developed elevated liver enzymes resulting in cessation of therapy. One patient was treated with tecovirimat (600 mg twice daily for 2 weeks orally), experienced no adverse effects, and had a shorter duration of viral shedding and illness (10 days hospitalisation) compared with the other six patients. One patient experienced a mild relapse 6 weeks after hospital discharge. INTERPRETATION: Human monkeypox poses unique challenges, even to well resourced health-care systems with HCID networks. Prolonged upper respiratory tract viral DNA shedding after skin lesion resolution challenged current infection prevention and control guidance. There is an urgent need for prospective studies of antivirals for this disease. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Monkeypox , Adult , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Monkeypox/diagnosis , Monkeypox/drug therapy , Monkeypox/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 556, 2022 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962756

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 is known to transmit in hospital settings, but the contribution of infections acquired in hospitals to the epidemic at a national scale is unknown. METHODS: We used comprehensive national English datasets to determine the number of COVID-19 patients with identified hospital-acquired infections (with symptom onset > 7 days after admission and before discharge) in acute English hospitals up to August 2020. As patients may leave the hospital prior to detection of infection or have rapid symptom onset, we combined measures of the length of stay and the incubation period distribution to estimate how many hospital-acquired infections may have been missed. We used simulations to estimate the total number (identified and unidentified) of symptomatic hospital-acquired infections, as well as infections due to onward community transmission from missed hospital-acquired infections, to 31st July 2020. RESULTS: In our dataset of hospitalised COVID-19 patients in acute English hospitals with a recorded symptom onset date (n = 65,028), 7% were classified as hospital-acquired. We estimated that only 30% (range across weeks and 200 simulations: 20-41%) of symptomatic hospital-acquired infections would be identified, with up to 15% (mean, 95% range over 200 simulations: 14.1-15.8%) of cases currently classified as community-acquired COVID-19 potentially linked to hospital transmission. We estimated that 26,600 (25,900 to 27,700) individuals acquired a symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection in an acute Trust in England before 31st July 2020, resulting in 15,900 (15,200-16,400) or 20.1% (19.2-20.7%) of all identified hospitalised COVID-19 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to hospitalised patients likely caused approximately a fifth of identified cases of hospitalised COVID-19 in the "first wave" in England, but less than 1% of all infections in England. Using time to symptom onset from admission for inpatients as a detection method likely misses a substantial proportion (> 60%) of hospital-acquired infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 244, 2022 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies assessing the prevalence of COVID-19 sequelae in adults and children were performed in the absence of an agreed definition. We investigated prevalence of post-COVID-19 condition (PCC) (WHO definition), at 6- and 12-months follow-up, amongst previously hospitalised adults and children and assessed risk factors. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of children and adults with confirmed COVID-19 in Moscow, hospitalised between April and August, 2020. Two follow-up telephone interviews, using the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium survey, were performed at 6 and 12 months after discharge. RESULTS: One thousand thirteen of 2509 (40%) of adults and 360 of 849 (42%) of children discharged participated in both the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. PCC prevalence was 50% (95% CI 47-53) in adults and 20% (95% CI 16-24) in children at 6 months, with decline to 34% (95% CI 31-37) and 11% (95% CI 8-14), respectively, at 12 months. In adults, female sex was associated with PCC at 6- and 12-month follow-up (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.65) and (OR 2.04, 1.54 to 2.69), respectively. Pre-existing hypertension (OR 1.42, 1.04 to 1.94) was associated with post-COVID-19 condition at 12 months. In children, neurological comorbidities were associated with PCC both at 6 months (OR 4.38, 1.36 to 15.67) and 12 months (OR 8.96, 2.55 to 34.82) while allergic respiratory diseases were associated at 12 months (OR 2.66, 1.04 to 6.47). CONCLUSIONS: Although prevalence of PCC declined one year after discharge, one in three adults and one in ten children experienced ongoing sequelae. In adults, females and persons with pre-existing hypertension, and in children, persons with neurological comorbidities or allergic respiratory diseases are at higher risk of PCC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Moscow/epidemiology , Patient Discharge , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
15.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(5): ofac179, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915843

ABSTRACT

Admission procalcitonin measurements and microbiology results were available for 1040 hospitalized adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (from 48 902 included in the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infections Consortium World Health Organization Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK study). Although procalcitonin was higher in bacterial coinfection, this was neither clinically significant (median [IQR], 0.33 [0.11-1.70] ng/mL vs 0.24 [0.10-0.90] ng/mL) nor diagnostically useful (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.56 [95% confidence interval, .51-.60]).

17.
Gigascience ; 112022 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873911

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has a complex strategy for the transcription of viral subgenomic mRNAs (sgmRNAs), which are targets for nucleic acid diagnostics. Each of these sgmRNAs has a unique 5' sequence, the leader-transcriptional regulatory sequence gene junction (leader-TRS junction), that can be identified using sequencing. High-resolution sequencing has been used to investigate the biology of SARS-CoV-2 and the host response in cell culture and animal models and from clinical samples. LeTRS, a bioinformatics tool, was developed to identify leader-TRS junctions and can be used as a proxy to quantify sgmRNAs for understanding virus biology. LeTRS is readily adaptable for other coronaviruses such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus or a future newly discovered coronavirus. LeTRS was tested on published data sets and novel clinical samples from patients and longitudinal samples from animal models with coronavirus disease 2019. LeTRS identified known leader-TRS junctions and identified putative novel sgmRNAs that were common across different mammalian species. This may be indicative of an evolutionary mechanism where plasticity in transcription generates novel open reading frames, which can then subject to selection pressure. The data indicated multiphasic abundance of sgmRNAs in two different animal models. This recapitulates the relative sgmRNA abundance observed in cells at early points in infection but not at late points. This pattern is reflected in some human nasopharyngeal samples and therefore has implications for transmission models and nucleic acid-based diagnostics. LeTRS provides a quantitative measure of sgmRNA abundance from sequencing data. This can be used to assess the biology of SARS-CoV-2 (or other coronaviruses) in clinical and nonclinical samples, especially to evaluate different variants and medical countermeasures that may influence viral RNA synthesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Cell Culture Techniques , Computational Biology , Humans , Mammals/genetics , Models, Animal , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
18.
JCI Insight ; 7(13)2022 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861743

ABSTRACT

The role of immune responses to previously seen endemic coronavirus epitopes in severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and disease progression has not yet been determined. Here, we show that a key characteristic of fatal outcomes with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is that the immune response to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is enriched for antibodies directed against epitopes shared with endemic beta-coronaviruses and has a lower proportion of antibodies targeting the more protective variable regions of the spike. The magnitude of antibody responses to the SARS-CoV-2 full-length spike protein, its domains and subunits, and the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid also correlated strongly with responses to the endemic beta-coronavirus spike proteins in individuals admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with fatal COVID-19 outcomes, but not in individuals with nonfatal outcomes. This correlation was found to be due to the antibody response directed at the S2 subunit of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which has the highest degree of conservation between the beta-coronavirus spike proteins. Intriguingly, antibody responses to the less cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid were not significantly different in individuals who were admitted to an ICU with fatal and nonfatal outcomes, suggesting an antibody profile in individuals with fatal outcomes consistent with an "original antigenic sin" type response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , Epitopes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Front Immunol ; 13: 807104, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855349

ABSTRACT

Immunoglobulin gene heterogeneity reflects the diversity and focus of the humoral immune response towards different infections, enabling inference of B cell development processes. Detailed compositional and lineage analysis of long read IGH repertoire sequencing, combining examples of pandemic, epidemic and endemic viral infections with control and vaccination samples, demonstrates general responses including increased use of IGHV4-39 in both Zaire Ebolavirus (EBOV) and COVID-19 patient cohorts. We also show unique characteristics absent in Respiratory Syncytial Virus or yellow fever vaccine samples: EBOV survivors show unprecedented high levels of class switching events while COVID-19 repertoires from acute disease appear underdeveloped. Despite the high levels of clonal expansion in COVID-19 IgG1 repertoires there is a striking lack of evidence of germinal centre mutation and selection. Given the differences in COVID-19 morbidity and mortality with age, it is also pertinent that we find significant differences in repertoire characteristics between young and old patients. Our data supports the hypothesis that a primary viral challenge can result in a strong but immature humoral response where failures in selection of the repertoire risk off-target effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ebolavirus , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Pandemics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
mSphere ; 7(3): e0091321, 2022 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832362

ABSTRACT

New variants of SARS-CoV-2 are continuing to emerge and dominate the global sequence landscapes. Several variants have been labeled variants of concern (VOCs) because they may have a transmission advantage, increased risk of morbidity and/or mortality, or immune evasion upon a background of prior infection or vaccination. Placing the VOCs in context with the underlying variability of SARS-CoV-2 is essential in understanding virus evolution and selection pressures. Dominant genome sequences and the population genetics of SARS-CoV-2 in nasopharyngeal swabs from hospitalized patients were characterized. Nonsynonymous changes at a minor variant level were identified. These populations were generally preserved when isolates were amplified in cell culture. To place the Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron VOCs in context, their growth was compared to clinical isolates of different lineages from earlier in the pandemic. The data indicated that the growth in cell culture of the Beta variant was more than that of the other variants in Vero E6 cells but not in hACE2-A549 cells. Looking at each time point, Beta grew more than the other VOCs in hACE2-A549 cells at 24 to 48 h postinfection. At 72 h postinfection there was no difference in the growth of any of the variants in either cell line. Overall, this work suggested that exploring the biology of SARS-CoV-2 is complicated by population dynamics and that these need to be considered with new variants. In the context of variation seen in other coronaviruses, the variants currently observed for SARS-CoV-2 are very similar in terms of their clinical spectrum of disease. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 is the causative agent of COVID-19. The virus has spread across the planet, causing a global pandemic. In common with other coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 genomes can become quite diverse as a consequence of replicating inside cells. This has given rise to multiple variants from the original virus that infected humans. These variants may have different properties and in the context of a widespread vaccination program may render vaccines less effective. Our research confirms the degree of genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 in patients. By comparing the growth of previous variants to the pattern seen with four variants of concern (VOCs) (Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron), we show that, at least in cells, Beta variant growth exceeds that of Alpha, Delta, and Omicron VOCs at 24 to 48 h in both Vero E6 and hACE2-A549 cells, but by 72 h postinfection, the amount of virus is not different from that of the other VOCs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Pandemics , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
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