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1.
Br J Haematol ; 197(3): 306-309, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35149986

ABSTRACT

Prior reports evaluating SARS-CoV-2 vaccine efficacy in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) used semiquantitative measurements of anti-S to evaluate immunity; however, neutralization assays were used to assess functional immunity in the trials leading to vaccine approval. Here, we identified decreased rates of seroconversion in vaccinated CLL patients and lower anti-S levels compared to healthy controls. Notably, we demonstrated similar results with the Roche anti-S assay and neutralization activity. Durable responses were seen at six months; augmentation with boosters was possible in responding patients. Absence of normal B cells, frequently seen in patients receiving Bruton tyrosine kinase and B-cell lymphoma 2 inhibitors, was a strong predictor of lack of seroconversion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Br J Haematol ; 197(2): 212-222, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35106754

ABSTRACT

There have been no large studies comparing reduced-intensity/non-myeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMA) to myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimens in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (T-NHL) patients undergoing allogeneic transplant (allo-HCT). A total of 803 adults with peripheral T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (age 18-65 years), undergoing allo-HCT between 2008-2019 and reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research with either MAC (n = 258) or RIC/NMA regimens (n = 545) were evaluated. There were no significant differences between the two cohorts in terms of patient sex, race and performance scores. Significantly more patients in the RIC/NMA cohort had peripheral blood grafts, haematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) of ≥3 and chemosensitive disease compared to the MAC cohort. On multivariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was not significantly different in the RIC/NMA cohort compared to the MAC cohort (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79-1.29; p = 0.95). Similarly, non-relapse mortality (NRM) (HR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.61-1.19; p = 0.34), risk of progression/relapse (HR = 1.29; 95% CI = 0.98-1.70; p = 0.07) and therapy failure (HR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.92-1.41, p = 0.23) were not significantly different between the two cohorts. Relative to MAC, RIC/NMA was associated with a significantly lower risk of grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.46-0.99, p = 0.04). Among chemorefractory patients, there was no difference in OS, therapy failure, relapse, or NRM between RIC/NMA and MAC regimens. In conclusion, we found no association between conditioning intensity and outcomes after allo-HCT for T-cell NHL.


Subject(s)
Graft vs Host Disease , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Immunoblastic Lymphadenopathy , Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Humans , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral/therapy , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Retrospective Studies , Transplantation Conditioning , Transplantation, Homologous , Young Adult
3.
Eur J Haematol ; 108(5): 379-382, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35043475

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Frontline treatment of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) with a single course of the purine nucleoside analog (PNA) produces a high rate of complete remission (CR) with prolonged durations. At the time of relapse, although treatment guidelines recommend re-treatment with a PNA alone or in combination with rituximab (R), practice patterns vary and data supporting each approach are limited. METHODS: We conducted a multisite outcomes analysis of patients treated for HCL between 1995 and 2018 at six US medical centers. All patients were treated with frontline PNA and subsequently required treatment with a PNA alone (PNA) or with R (+R). RESULTS: Of the 88 patients analyzed, 56 (63.6%) received second-line PNA and 22 (36.4%) received a PNA + R. Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. There was no difference in median PFS [67 months (95% CI 43.8 non-reached (NR)) vs. 65 months (95% CI 60-NR)] or 5-year OS [98% (95% CI 0.94-1) vs. 94% (95% CI 0.83-1), p = .104] in the PNA versus PNA + R cohorts, respectively. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating the role of R in treatment of relapsed HCL and suggests that there is no advantage to the addition of R to PNA therapy at the time of first re-treatment.


Subject(s)
Leukemia, Hairy Cell , Nucleosides , Humans , Leukemia, Hairy Cell/drug therapy , Purine Nucleosides , Purines , Recurrence , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Clin Oncol ; 40(5): 481-491, 2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34914545

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Mosunetuzumab is a bispecific antibody targeting CD20 and CD3 that redirects T cells to engage and eliminate malignant B cells and is being developed for relapsed or refractory (R/R) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs). METHODS: This first-in-human trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02500407) evaluated the safety and tolerability and efficacy of mosunetuzumab in patients with R/R B-NHL and established the recommended phase II dose. Data from dose escalation are presented. Single-agent mosunetuzumab was administered intravenously in 3-week cycles, at full dose in cycle 1 day 1 (group A) or with ascending (step-up) doses during cycle 1 on days 1, 8, and 15 (group B), for eight or 17 cycles on the basis of tumor response. RESULTS: Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled. Doses up to 2.8 mg and 60 mg were assessed in groups A and B, respectively; maximum tolerated dose was not exceeded. In group B (n = 197), common adverse events (≥ 20% of patients) were neutropenia (28.4%), cytokine release syndrome (27.4%), hypophosphatemia (23.4%), fatigue (22.8%), and diarrhea (21.8%). Cytokine release syndrome was mostly low-grade (grade ≥ 3: 1.0%) and mainly confined to cycle 1. Across the doses investigated (group B), best overall response rates were 34.9% and 66.2% in patients with aggressive and indolent B-NHL, respectively, and complete response rates were 19.4% and 48.5%. Among patients with a complete response, the median duration of response was 22.8 months (95% CI, 7.6 to not estimable) and 20.4 (95% CI, 16 to not estimable) in patients with aggressive and indolent B-NHL, respectively. CONCLUSION: Mosunetuzumab, administered with step-up dosing, has a manageable safety profile and induces durable complete responses in R/R B-NHL. The expansion stage of the study is ongoing at the dose level of 1/2/60/60/30 mg selected for further study.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Bispecific/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/administration & dosage , Lymphoma, B-Cell/drug therapy , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Bispecific/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Canada , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, B-Cell/immunology , Lymphoma, B-Cell/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Remission Induction , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States , Young Adult
7.
Blood Adv ; 6(3): 920-930, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34861680

ABSTRACT

Mature T-cell lymphomas constitute the most common indication for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) of all lymphomas. Large studies evaluating contemporary outcomes of allo-HCT in mature T-cell lymphomas relative to commonly used donor sources are not available. Included in this registry study were adult patients who had undergone allo-HCT for anaplastic large cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), or peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) between 2008 and 2018. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) platforms compared were posttransplant cyclophosphamide-based haploidentical (haplo-)HCT, matched sibling donor (MSD) HCT, matched unrelated donor HCT with in vivo T-cell depletion (MUD TCD+), and matched unrelated donor HCT without in vivo T-cell depletion (MUD TCD-). Coprimary end points were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), and relapse/progression incidence (RI). A total of 1942 patients were eligible (237 haplo-HCT; 911 MSD; 468 MUD TCD+; 326 MUD TCD-). Cohorts were comparable for baseline characteristics with the exception of higher proportions of patients with decreased performance status (PS) and marrow graft recipients in the haplo-HCT group. Using univariate and multivariate comparisons, OS, PFS, RI, and NRM were not significantly different among the haplo-HCT, MSD, MUD TCD+, and MUD TCD- cohorts, with 3-year OS and PFS of 60%, 63%, 59%, and 64%, respectively, and 50%, 50%, 48%, and 52%, respectively. Significant predictors of inferior OS and PFS on multivariate analysis were active disease status at HCT and decreased PS. AITL was associated with significantly reduced relapse risk and better PFS compared with PTCL-NOS. Allo-HCT can provide durable PFS in patients with mature T-cell lymphoma (TCL). Outcomes of haplo-HCT were comparable to those of matched donor allo-HCT.


Subject(s)
Graft vs Host Disease , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral , Adult , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects
9.
Clin Cancer Res ; 28(4): 603-608, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34789482

ABSTRACT

The management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has undergone unprecedented changes over the last decade. Modern targeted therapies are incorporated into clinical practice. Unfortunately, patients have begun to develop resistance or intolerance to multiple classes. Symptomatic patients previously treated with a BTK inhibitor (BTKi) and venetoclax represent a new and rapidly growing unmet need in CLL. Here, we define unmet needs in a modern treatment context. We also critically review the literature for PI3K inhibitors and chemoimmunotherapy and lack of data to support their utility following BTKis and venetoclax. Finally, we suggest opportunities to ensure the continued innovation for patients with CLL.


Subject(s)
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , Humans , Immunotherapy , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
10.
Br J Haematol ; 195(5): 757-763, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34581433

ABSTRACT

In young and fit patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), intensive induction therapy followed by a consolidative autologous haematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) is the standard of care in the front-line setting. Recently, time-to-event analysis has emerged as an important risk assessment tool in lymphoma, though its impact in MCL is not well defined. We utilized the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database to evaluate the effect of post-autoHCT time to relapse on overall survival (OS) over time in 461 patients who underwent autoHCT within 12 months of MCL diagnosis. On multivariate analysis, the impact of relapse on OS was greatest at the six-month [hazard ratio (HR) = 7·68], 12-month (HR = 6·68), and 18-month (HR = 5·81) landmark timepoints. Using a dynamic landmark model we demonstrate that adjusted OS at five years following each landmark timepoint improved with time for relapsing and non-relapsing patients. Furthermore, early relapse (<18 months) following autoHCT defines a high-risk group with inferior post-relapse OS. This retrospective analysis highlights the impact of time to relapse on OS in MCL patients undergoing up-front autoHCT and emphasizes the need to consider novel therapeutic approaches for patients suffering early relapse.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/therapy , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis , Time Factors , Transplantation, Autologous
11.
Blood ; 139(9): 1330-1339, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34570879

ABSTRACT

The relative efficacy of autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (auto-HCT) vs chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who achieve a partial remission (PR) after salvage chemotherapy is not known. Using the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research registry database, we identified adult patients with DLBCL who received either an auto-HCT (2013-2019) or CAR-T treatment with axicabtagene ciloleucel (2018-2019) while in a PR by computed tomography or positron emission tomography scan. We compared the clinical outcomes between the 2 cohorts using univariable and multivariable regression models after adjustment for relevant baseline and clinical factors. In the univariable analysis, the 2-year progression-free survival (52% vs 42%; P = .1) and the rate of 100-day nonrelapse mortality (4% vs 2%; P = .3) were not different between the 2 cohorts, but consolidation with auto-HCT was associated with a lower rate of relapse/progression (40% vs 53%; P = .05) and a superior overall survival (OS) (69% vs 47%; P = .004) at 2 years. In the multivariable regression analysis, treatment with auto-HCT was associated with a significantly lower risk of relapse/progression rate (hazard ratio = 1.49; P = .01) and a superior OS (hazard ratio = 1.63; P = .008). In patients with DLBCL in a PR after salvage therapy, treatment with auto-HCT was associated with a lower incidence of relapse and a superior OS compared with CAR-T. These data support the role of auto-HCT as the standard of care in transplant-eligible patients with relapsed DLBCL in PR after salvage therapy.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autografts , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/mortality , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Survival Rate
13.
Transplant Cell Ther ; 27(9): 720-728, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34452722

ABSTRACT

Autologous (auto-) and allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are accepted treatment modalities in contemporary treatment algorithms for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy recently received approval for MCL; however, its exact place and sequence in relation to HCT remain unclear. The American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, Center of International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation jointly convened an expert panel to formulate consensus recommendations for role, timing, and sequencing of auto-HCT, allo-HCT, and CAR T cell therapy for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory (R/R) MCL. The RAND-modified Delphi method was used to generate consensus statements. Seventeen consensus statements were generated, with a few key statements as follows: in the first line setting, auto-HCT consolidation represents standard of care in eligible patients, whereas there is no clear role of allo-HCT or CAR T cell therapy outside of clinical trials. In the R/R setting, the preferential option is CAR T cell therapy, especially in patients with MCL failing or intolerant to at least one Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, while allo-HCT is recommended if CAR T cell therapy fails or is infeasible. Several recommendations were based on expert opinion, where the panel developed consensus statements for important real-world clinical scenarios to guide clinical practice. In the absence of contemporary evidence-based data, the panel found RAND-modified Delphi methodology effective in providing a formal framework for developing consensus recommendations for the timing and sequence of cellular therapies for MCL.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell , Adult , Bone Marrow , Humans , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Transplantation Conditioning , United States
14.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 56(12): 2911-2921, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34413469

ABSTRACT

Autologous (auto-) or allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are accepted treatment modalities for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Recently, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy received approval for MCL; however, its exact place and sequence in relation to HCT is unclear. The ASTCT, CIBMTR, and the EBMT, jointly convened an expert panel to formulate consensus recommendations for role, timing, and sequencing of auto-, allo-HCT, and CAR T-cell therapy for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory (R/R) MCL. The RAND-modified Delphi method was used to generate consensus statements. Seventeen consensus statements were generated; in the first-line setting auto-HCT consolidation represents standard-of-care in eligible patients, whereas there is no clear role of allo-HCT or CAR T-cell therapy, outside of a clinical trial. In the R/R setting, the preferential option is CAR T-cell therapy especially in MCL failing or intolerant to at least one Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, while allo-HCT is recommended if CAR T-cell therapy has failed or is not feasible. In the absence of contemporary evidence-based data, the panel found RAND-modified Delphi methodology effective in providing a formal framework for developing consensus recommendations for the timing and sequence of cellular therapies for MCL.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell , Adult , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Humans , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/drug therapy , Transplantation Conditioning , Transplantation, Autologous
15.
Lancet Haematol ; 8(8): e562-e571, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34329577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma could be treated with multiagent salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The aim of this study is to establish the safety and activity of dose-dense brentuximab vedotin combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (BV-ICE) chemotherapy in second-line treatment of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. METHODS: We conducted a single-arm, open-label, phase 1/2 study of dose-dense BV-ICE at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, University of Washington (Seattle, WA, USA). Eligibility criteria were age 18 years or older; diagnosis of first relapse, primary refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma after one previous line of therapy; measurable disease of at least 1 cm in the longest axis, CT of chest, abdomen, and pelvis with PET within the past 28 days; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1; and adequate organ function. A 3 + 3 dose escalation study was done for the phase 1 part of the trial to establish the maximum tolerated dose to be used for the phase 2 study. Brentuximab vedotin was delivered on days 1 and 8 at either 1·2 mg/kg (dose level 1) or 1·5 mg/kg (dose level 2) intravenously (capped at 150 mg) with standard dosing of ICE on days 1-3 (ifosfamide 5 g/m2 plus mesna 5 g/m2 intravenously over 24 h on day 2, carboplatin area under the curve 5 on day 2 in one intravenous injection, and etoposide 100 mg/m2 on days 1-3 in one intravenous injection per day) for two 21-day cycles. The primary endpoint was to establish the recommended phase 2 dose (phase 1 part) and complete response rate after two cycles, with a prespecified target of 78% (phase 2 part). Safety analysis was done in all enrolled participants and the primary activity analysis was done in all patients with evaluable response data. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02227199); enrolment and study treatment are complete. FINDINGS: Between Oct 16, 2014, and Feb 10, 2020, we enrolled 45 patients with a median age of 31 years (IQR 28-45). The recommended phase 2 dose of brentuximab vedotin was established to be 1·5 mg/kg. After a median follow-up of 3·1 years (IQR 1·7-4·1), 32 (74%; 95% CI 58·8-86·5) of 43 evaluable patients had complete responses after two cycles of treatment. Grade 3-4 haematological toxic effects were common, including neutropenia (33 [73%]), anaemia (six [13%]), and thrombocytopenia (36 [80%]). The most common grade 3-4 non-haematological toxic effects were febrile neutropenia (four [9%]), sepsis (six [13%]), increased alanine aminotransferase (five [11%]), hyperglycaemia (three [7%]), pulmonary embolism (two [4%]), and increased aspartate aminotransferase (two [4%]). There was one (2%) on-treatment death due to multisystem organ failure that was considered treatment related. Serious adverse events occurred in 13 (29%) patients. INTERPRETATION: Our data suggest that dose-dense BV-ICE is a rapidly administered and active salvage regimen for patients with relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma despite a complete response in this trial lower than the prespecified phase 2 target. Although cross-trial comparisons should be made with caution, activity results seem to be similar to previously presented brentuximab vedotin chemotherapy salvage combinations delivered over much longer durations and can be considered in young (<60 years), transplantation-eligible patients for second-line therapy. FUNDING: Seagen, Lymphoma Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, and generous philanthropic donations to the University of Washington from numerous individuals and families in support of lymphoma research.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects , Hodgkin Disease/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy , Salvage Therapy , Adult , Brentuximab Vedotin/administration & dosage , Carboplatin/administration & dosage , Etoposide/administration & dosage , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hodgkin Disease/pathology , Humans , Ifosfamide/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Prognosis , Survival Rate
16.
Blood ; 138(18): 1768-1773, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34297826
18.
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am ; 35(4): 847-862, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34174989

ABSTRACT

Despite significant improvement in clinical outcomes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), patients who experience failure of Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors or venetoclax benefit from immune therapy approaches. Allogeneic transplant is a potentially curative treatment of CLL but is associated with risk of morbidity and mortality. Although still experimental, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy provides durable remissions in patients with deep molecular responses. This review summarizes the relevant literature and discusses an approach to treatment sequencing and timing of referral for immune therapy. Novel immunotherapy approaches are being investigated and potentially can be utilized in sequence or combination with targeted agents.


Subject(s)
Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen , Allografts , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/therapy , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/genetics
19.
Expert Opin Pharmacother ; 22(6): 655-665, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33645381

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Venetoclax, an oral, BCL-2 inhibitor, is approved by the FDA for treatment of CLL in all lines of therapy. Data from landmark studies, including the CLL14 and MURANO trials, demonstrated marked improvement in clinical outcomes compared to chemoimmunotherapy when venetoclax was used in combination with CD20 monoclonal antibodies for fixed treatment duration. AREAS COVERED: This article reviews the mechanism of action of venetoclax and discusses how curtailing the BCL signaling pathway undermines CLL pathophysiology. The authors also give their clinical experience with the drug, with emphasis on assessing and managing the risk of venetoclax-associated tumor lysis syndrome (TLS). EXPERT OPINION: Venetoclax has positioned itself as one of the primary treatment options for CLL, given the consistent efficacy and deep remissions it has elicited across multiple settings of the disease with a time-limited schedule. Accurate TLS risk evaluation and stringent adherence to the dose-escalation protocols will help optimize patient outcomes. Finally, we expect that current and future studies will (1) ascertain the ideal treatment duration using the minimal residual disease state as a guide and (2) help us understand the optimal role of venetoclax in combination or in sequence with other novel targeted therapies in the treatment of CLL.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bridged Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic/therapeutic use , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
20.
J Adv Pract Oncol ; 11(3): 312-315, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33598332

ABSTRACT

Mazyar Shadman, MD, MPH, and Amy Goodrich, CRNP, reviewed data regarding the mechanistic activity, efficacy, and safety of approved and emerging therapeutic options for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and strategies for managing adverse events associated with approved therapies for CLL.

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