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1.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(20): 23459-23470, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498163

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since April 2021, the SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.167) Delta variant has been rampant worldwide. Recently, this variant has spread in Guangzhou, China. Our objective was to characterize the clinical features and risk factors of severe cases of the Delta variant in Guangzhou. METHODS: A total of 144 patients with the Delta variant were enrolled, and the data between the severe and non-severe groups were compared. Logistic regression methods and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to investigate the risk factors of severe cases. RESULTS: The severity of the Delta variant was 11.1%. Each 1-year increase in age (OR, 1.089; 95% CI, 1.035-1.147; P = 0.001) and each 1-µmol/L increase in total bilirubin (OR, 1.198; 95% CI, 1.021-1.406; P = 0.039) were risk factors for severe cases. Moreover, the risk of progression to severe cases increased 13.444-fold and 3.922-fold when the age was greater than 58.5 years (HR, 13.444; 95% CI, 2.989-60.480; P = 0.001) or the total bilirubin level was greater than 7.23 µmol/L (HR, 3.922; 95% CI, 1.260-12.207; P = 0.018), respectively. CONCLUSION: Older age and elevated total bilirubin were independent risk factors for severe cases of the Delta variant in Guangzhou, especially if the age was greater than 58.5 years or the total bilirubin level was greater than 7.23 µmol/L.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cough/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
2.
J Diabetes Res ; 2020: 5237840, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978842

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Previous studies of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have focused on the general population. However, diabetes (DM) as one of the most common comorbidities is rarely studied in detail. This study is aimed at describing clinical characteristics and determining risk factors of ICU admission for COVID-19 patients with DM. Methods: Data were extracted from 288 adult patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital. Demographic characteristics, laboratory results, radiographic findings, complications, and treatments were collected and compared between DM and non-DM groups. Binary logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with ICU admission for COVID-19 patients with DM or non-DM. Results: COVID-19 patients with DM showed as older ages, higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), myoglobin, alanine transaminase (ALT), and aspartate transaminase (AST). They were also more prone to transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) for treatment. Multiple regression analysis showed that the following were the independent risk factors for COVID-19 patients with DM that received ICU admission: each 1-year increase in age (odds ratio (OR), 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.13; P = 0.007), respiratory rate over 24 times per minute (OR, 5.22; 95% CI, 2.26-16.58; P = 0.016), HbA1c greater than 7% (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 1.82-10.55; P = 0.012), and AST higher than 40 U/L (OR, 2.96; 95% CI, 1.58-8.85; P = 0.022). In addition, each 1-year increase in age (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10; P = 0.006), diarrhea (OR, 4.62; 95% CI, 2.01-9.36; P = 0.022), respiratory rate over 24 times per minute (OR, 5.13; 95% CI, 1.18-16.82; P = 0.035), CRP greater than 10 mg/L (OR, 5.19; 95% CI, 1.37-13.25, P = 0.009), and TnI higher than 0.03 µg/L (OR, 6.48; 95% CI, 1.17-21.38; P = 0.036) were risk factors for ICU admission of COVID-19 patients with non-DM. Conclusions: The older age, respiratory rate over 24 times per minute, HbA1c greater than 7%, and AST higher than 40 U/L were risk factors of ICU admission for COVID-19 patients with diabetes. Investigating and monitoring these factors could assist in the risk stratification of COVID-19 patients with DM at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Symptom Assessment
3.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(15): 15730-15740, 2020 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 has raged around the world since March, 2020. We aim to describe the clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe patients with COVID-19 in Guangzhou. RESULTS: The severity and mortality of COVID-19 was 10.4% and 0.3% respectively. And each 1-year increase in age (OR, 1.057; 95% CI, 1.018-1.098; P=0.004), Wuhan exposure history greater than 2 weeks (OR, 2.765; 95% CI, 1.040-7.355; P=0.042), diarrhea (OR, 24.349; 95% CI, 3.580-165.609; P=0.001), chronic kidney disease (OR, 6.966; 95% CI, 1.310-37.058; P = 0.023), myoglobin higher than 106 µg/L (OR, 8.910; 95% CI, 1.225-64.816; P=0.031), white blood cell higher than 10×109/L (OR, 5.776; 95% CI, 1.052-31.722; P=0.044), and C-reactive protein higher than 10 mg/L (OR, 5.362; 95% CI, 1.631-17.626; P=0.006) were risk factors for severe cases. CONCLUSION: Older age, Wuhan exposure history, diarrhea, chronic kidney disease, elevated myoglobin, elevated white blood cell and C-reactive protein were independent risk factors for severe patients with COVID-19 in Guangzhou. METHODS: We included 288 adult patients with COVID-19 and compared the data between severe and non-severe group. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression methods to explore risk factors of severe cases.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Coronavirus Infections , Diarrhea , Leukocyte Count/methods , Myoglobin/analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/etiology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Incubation Period , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
4.
J Clin Biochem Nutr ; 67(2): 126-130, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696117

ABSTRACT

Severe patients of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may progress rapidly to critical stage. This study aimed to identify factors useful for predicting the progress. 33 severe COVID-19 patients at the intensive care unit were included in this study. During treatment, 13 patients deteriorated and required further treatment for supporting organ function. The remaining 20 patients alleviated and were transferred to the general wards. The multivariate COX regression analyses showed that hypoproteinemia was an independent risk factor associated with deterioration of severe patients (HR, 0.763; 95% CI, 0.596 to 0.978; p = 0.033). The restricted cubic spline indicated that when HR = 1, the corresponding value of albumin is 29.6 g/L. We used the cutoff of 29.6 g/L to divide these patients. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that the survival rate of the high-albumin group was higher than that of the low-albumin group. Therefore, hypoalbuminemia may be an independent risk factor to evaluate poor prognosis of severely patients with COVID-19, especially when albumin levels were below 29.6 g/L.

5.
Clin Rheumatol ; 39(9): 2803-2810, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679748

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has become a global concern. A large number of reports have explained the clinical characteristics and treatment strategies of COVID-19, but the characteristics and treatment of COVID-19 patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are still unclear. Here, we report the clinical features and treatment of the first SLE patient with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. This was a 39-year-old woman, diagnosed with SLE 15 years ago, whose overall clinical characteristics (symptoms, laboratory tests, and chest CTs) were similar to those of the general COVID-19 patients. She continued to take the previous SLE drugs (doses of glucocorticoids, hydroxychloroquine, and immunosuppressive agents were not reduced) and was treated with strict antiviral and infection prevention treatment. After the first discharge, she got a recurrence of COVID-19 during her home isolation, and then returned to hospital and continued the previous therapy. Finally, this long-term immune suppressive patient's COVID-19 was successfully cured. The successful recovery of this case has significant reference value for the future treatment of COVID-19 patients with SLE. Key Points • COVID-19 patients with SLE is advocated to continue the medical treatment for SLE. • Hydroxychloroquine may have potential benefits for COVID-19 patients with SLE. • COVID-19 patients with SLE is prone to relapse, and multiple follow-ups are necessary.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , RNA, Viral , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Moxifloxacin/therapeutic use , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Recurrence , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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