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1.
JMIR Formative Research ; 6(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871737

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, to prevent the spread of the virus, federal regulatory barriers around telemedicine were lifted, and health care institutions encouraged patients to use telemedicine, including video appointments. Many patients, however, still chose face-2-face (f2f) appointments for nonemergent clinical care. Objective: We explored patients’ personal and environmental barriers to the use of video appointments from April 2020 to December 2020. Methods: We conducted qualitative telephone interviews of Mayo Clinic patients who attended f2f appointments at the Mayo Clinic from April 2020 to December 2020 but did not utilize Mayo Clinic video appointment services during that time frame. Results: We found that, although most patients were concerned about preventing COVID-19 transmission, they trusted Mayo Clinic to keep them safe when attending f2f appointments. Many expressed that a video appointment made it difficult to establish rapport with their providers. Other common barriers to video appointments were perceived therapeutic benefits of f2f appointments, low digital literacy, and concerns about privacy and security. Conclusions: Our study provides an in-depth investigation into barriers to engaging in video appointments for nonemergent clinical care in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings corroborate many barriers prevalent in the prepandemic literature and suggest that rapport barriers need to be analyzed and problem-solved at a granular level.

2.
Alcohol Alcohol ; 2022 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831012

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The objective of this study is to longitudinally assess sociodemographic and psychological correlates of increased alcohol use during the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) period among adolescents and young adults. METHODS: Pre-COVID period is defined as the 1-year period on or before 31 March 2020, and during-COVID period is defined as the period from 1st April 2020 to 30 March 2021. Univariable logistic regression models are used to evaluate the association of demographic characteristics, Area Deprivation Index (ADI), rurality, changes in Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale severity, and the risk of increased alcohol consumption (binge drinking, number of drinks and drinking regularity) from pre-COVID to during-COVID period. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Our study found that worsened anxiety symptoms, older age, being in college and current cigarette smoking status were associated with increased alcohol use among youth during the pandemic year. Socioeconomic position (measured by ADI) and rural status were not found to be associated with increased alcohol use among adolescents and young adults.

3.
Soc Sci Med ; 274: 113779, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176937

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, and consequent social distancing directives have been observed to negatively impact social relationships but the impact of these changes on the quality of social relationships at a population level has not been explored. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in social relationships in a U.S. population sample during a time of social distancing. METHODS: We deployed a matched, longitudinal survey design of the National Institutes of Health Adult Social Relationship Scales to assess the social aspects of emotional support, instrumental support, friendship, loneliness, perceived hostility, and perceived rejection from a time without social distancing (February 2018) to a time where social distancing directives were active (May 2020). Changes in social relationships were compared using paired t-tests, and generalized linear regression models were constructed to identify subpopulations experiencing differential changes in each subdomain of social relationships during social distancing. RESULTS: Within our sample population, individuals experienced an increased sense of emotional support, instrumental support, and loneliness, and decreased feelings of friendship and perceived hostility during a period of social distancing. Individuals with low self-rated health experienced a decreased sense of emotional support, and females experienced increased feelings of loneliness compared with males. CONCLUSIONS: Social distancing measurably impacts social relationships and may have a disproportionate impact on females and individuals with lower self-rated health. If novel emergent infectious diseases become more commonplace, social interventions may be needed to mitigate the potential adverse impact of social distancing on social relationships.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
4.
SAGE Open Med ; 8: 2050312120965321, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: News articles, commentaries, and opinion articles have suggested that ongoing social distancing measures coupled with economic challenges during COVID-19 may worsen stress, affective state, and substance use across the globe. We sought to advance our understanding of the differences between individuals who change their substance use patterns during a public health crisis and those who do not. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of young adults (18-25 years of age) assessing respondent characteristics and vaping, tobacco, alcohol, and/or marijuana use. We calculated prevalence estimates, prevalence changes, and prevalence ratios with associated 95% confidence intervals and looked for differences with the chi-square test. RESULTS: Of the total sample, 53.2% (n = 542/1018) young adults reported vaping or using tobacco, alcohol, and/or marijuana. Among the 542 respondents reporting use, 34.3% reported a change in their use patterns. Among respondents reporting changes in substance use patterns during the pandemic (n = 186), 68.8% reported an increase in alcohol use, 44.0% reported a decrease in vaping product use, and 47.3% reported a decrease in tobacco product use due to COVID-19. Substance use changed significantly for respondents with increasing degree of loneliness (continuous loneliness score: prevalence ratio = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.25), anxiety (prevalence ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.85), and depression (prevalence ratio = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.13-1.82). CONCLUSION: Self-reported substance use among young adults was observed to change during a pandemic, and the degree of loneliness appears to impact these changes. Innovative strategies are needed to address loneliness, anxiety, depression, and substance use during global health crises that impact social contact.

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