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1.
Tourism Economics ; 29(3):742-758, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20238050

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused tremendous fear and uncertainty and affected health, economy, and social life in an unprecedented form worldwide. Yet, the level of knowledge on its economic implications is very limited. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to explain the health, social, and economic impacts of COVID-19. Because the tourism is one of the most affected industries by the pandemic, this study aims to explain the effects of COVID-19 cases and deaths, global fear, and government responses on Turkey's tourism industry. Empirical findings show that the tourism industry reacts negatively to new cases, number of deaths, and global fear measures. Also, government containment and health measures and economic supports positively affect the tourism industry. Furthermore, government stringency policies drive down the tourism industry's performance. The findings of this study provide significant implications for tourism and travel firms, policy makers, and future research.

2.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 30: 100648, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231116

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is associated with risk of persistent neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric complications. It is unclear whether the neuropsychological manifestations of COVID-19 present as a uniform syndrome or as distinct neurophenotypes with differing risk factors and recovery outcomes. We examined post-acute neuropsychological profiles following SARS-CoV-2 infection in 205 patients recruited from inpatient and outpatient populations, using an unsupervised machine learning cluster analysis, with objective and subjective measures as input features. This resulted in three distinct post-COVID clusters. In the largest cluster (69%), cognitive functions were within normal limits, although mild subjective attention and memory complaints were reported. Vaccination was associated with membership in this "normal cognition" phenotype. Cognitive impairment was present in the remaining 31% of the sample but clustered into two differentially impaired groups. In 16% of participants, memory deficits, slowed processing speed, and fatigue were predominant. Risk factors for membership in the "memory-speed impaired" neurophenotype included anosmia and more severe COVID-19 infection. In the remaining 15% of participants, executive dysfunction was predominant. Risk factors for membership in this milder "dysexecutive" neurophenotype included disease-nonspecific factors such as neighborhood deprivation and obesity. Recovery outcomes at 6-month follow-up differed across neurophenotypes, with the normal cognition group showing improvement in verbal memory and psychomotor speed, the dysexecutive group showing improvement in cognitive flexibility, and the memory-speed impaired group showing no objective improvement and relatively worse functional outcomes compared to the other two clusters. These results indicate that there are multiple post-acute neurophenotypes of COVID-19, with different etiological pathways and recovery outcomes. This information may inform phenotype-specific approaches to treatment.

3.
researchsquare; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-2363210.v2

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is associated with risk of persistent neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric complications, termed “long COVID”. It is unclear whether the neuropsychological manifestations of COVID-19 present as a uniform syndrome or as distinct neurophenotypes with differing risk factors and recovery outcomes. We examined post-acute neuropsychological profiles following SARS-CoV-2 infection in 205 patients recruited from inpatient and outpatient populations, using an unsupervised machine learning cluster analysis, with objective and subjective measures as input features. This resulted in three distinct post-COVID clusters. In the largest cluster (69%), cognitive functions were within normal limits, although mild subjective attention and memory complaints were reported. Vaccination was associated with membership in this “normal cognition” phenotype. Cognitive impairment was present in the remaining 31% of the sample but clustered into two differentially impaired groups. In 16% of participants, memory deficits, slowed processing speed, and fatigue were predominant. Risk factors for membership in the “memory-speed impaired” neurophenotype included anosmia and more severe COVID-19 infection. In the remaining 15% of participants, executive dysfunction was predominant. Risk factors for membership in this milder “dysexecutive” neurophenotype included disease-nonspecific factors such as neighborhood deprivation and obesity. Recovery outcomes at 6-month follow-up differed across neurophenotypes, with the normal cognition group showing improvement in verbal memory and psychomotor speed, the dysexecutive group showing improvement in cognitive flexibility, and the memory-speed impaired group showing no objective improvement and relatively worse functional outcomes compared to the other two clusters. These results indicate that there are multiple post-acute neurophenotypes of long COVID, with different etiological pathways and recovery outcomes. This information may inform phenotype-specific approaches to treatment.

4.
J Acad Consult Liaison Psychiatry ; 62(5): 493-500, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the science of consultation-liaison psychiatry advances, the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry's Guidelines and Evidence-Based Medicine Subcommittee reviews articles of interest to help academy members remain familiar with the latest in evidence-based practice. OBJECTIVE: We identify the 10 most important articles for clinical practice in consultation-liaison psychiatry from 2020 using the new Importance and Quality instrument for assessing scientific literature. METHODS: The subcommittee published annotated abstracts for 97 articles on the academy website in 2020. Reviewers then rated all articles on clinical importance to practice and quality of scholarship using the Importance and Quality instrument. We describe the 10 articles with the highest aggregate scores and analyze the reliability of Importance and Quality instrument. RESULTS: Twenty-four raters identified the top 10 scoring articles of 2020. These articles provide practical guidance on key areas of consultation-liaison psychiatry including management of COVID-19, lithium treatment for complex patients, medical risks among patients with severe mental illness, and substance use disorders in medical settings. The assessment instrument demonstrated good to excellent interrater reliability. CONCLUSION: These articles offer valuable guidance for consultation-liaison psychiatrists regardless of their practice area. Collaborative literature reviews with standardized assessments help clinicians deliver evidence-based care and foster a high standard of practice across the specialty.


Subject(s)
Psychiatry , Referral and Consultation , COVID-19/psychology , Cannabis/adverse effects , Delirium/classification , Encephalitis , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Lithium Compounds/adverse effects , Lithium Compounds/therapeutic use , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/mortality , Mindfulness , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
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