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1.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(12): 106118, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: RCVS (Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstrictive Syndrome) is a condition associated with vasoactive agents that alter endothelial function. There is growing evidence that endothelial inflammation contributes to cerebrovascular disease in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In our study, we describe the clinical features, risk factors, and outcomes of RCVS in a multicenter case series of patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Multicenter retrospective case series. We collected clinical characteristics, imaging, and outcomes of patients with RCVS and COVID-19 identified at each participating site. RESULTS: Ten patients were identified, 7 women, ages 21 - 62 years. Risk factors included use of vasoconstrictive agents in 7 and history of migraine in 2. Presenting symptoms included thunderclap headache in 5 patients with recurrent headaches in 4. Eight were hypertensive on arrival to the hospital. Symptoms of COVID-19 included fever in 2, respiratory symptoms in 8, and gastrointestinal symptoms in 1. One patient did not have systemic COVID-19 symptoms. MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in 3 cases, intraparenchymal hemorrhage in 2, acute ischemic stroke in 4, FLAIR hyperintensities in 2, and no abnormalities in 1 case. Neurovascular imaging showed focal segment irregularity and narrowing concerning for vasospasm of the left MCA in 4 cases and diffuse, multifocal narrowing of the intracranial vasculature in 6 cases. Outcomes varied, with 2 deaths, 2 remaining in the ICU, and 6 surviving to discharge with modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 0 (n=3), 2 (n=2), and 3 (n=1). CONCLUSIONS: Our series suggests that patients with COVID-19 may be at risk for RCVS, particularly in the setting of additional risk factors such as exposure to vasoactive agents. There was variability in the symptoms and severity of COVID-19, clinical characteristics, abnormalities on imaging, and mRS scores. However, a larger study is needed to validate a causal relationship between RCVS and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Arteries/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Vasoconstriction , Vasospasm, Intracranial/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebral Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Syndrome , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States , Vasospasm, Intracranial/diagnostic imaging , Vasospasm, Intracranial/physiopathology , Vasospasm, Intracranial/therapy , Young Adult
2.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(7)2021 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323140

ABSTRACT

Acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVOs) is a major contributor to stroke deaths and disabilities; however, identification for emergency treatment is challenging. We recruited two separate cohorts of suspected stroke patients and screened a panel of blood-derived protein biomarkers for LVO detection. Diagnostic performance was estimated by using blood biomarkers in combination with NIHSS-derived stroke severity scales. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that D-dimer (OR 16, 95% CI 5-60; p-value < 0.001) and GFAP (OR 0.002, 95% CI 0-0.68; p-value < 0.05) comprised the optimal panel for LVO detection. Combinations of D-dimer and GFAP with a number of stroke severity scales increased the number of true positives, while reducing false positives due to hemorrhage, as compared to stroke scales alone (p-value < 0.001). A combination of the biomarkers with FAST-ED resulted in the highest accuracy at 95% (95% CI: 87-99%), with sensitivity of 91% (95% CI: 72-99%), and specificity of 96% (95% CI: 90-99%). Diagnostic accuracy was confirmed in an independent cohort, in which accuracy was again shown to be 95% (95% CI: 87-99%), with a sensitivity of 82% (95% CI: 57-96%), and specificity of 98% (95% CI: 92-100%). Accordingly, the combination of D-dimer and GFAP with stroke scales may provide a simple and highly accurate tool for identifying LVO patients, with a potential impact on time to treatment.

3.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 152(2): 231-235, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on obstetric care and outcomes. METHODS: A prospective observational single-center study was performed, including all antenatal and parturient women admitted from April to August, 2020. Data were collected regarding number of admissions, deliveries, antenatal visits, reason for inaccessibility of health care, and complications during pregnancy, and compared with data from the pre-COVID period of October 2019 to February 2020. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 45.1% in institutional deliveries (P < 0.001), a percentage point increase of 7.2 in high-risk pregnancy, and 2.5-fold rise in admission to the intensive care unit of pregnant women during the pandemic. One-third of women had inadequate antenatal visits. The main reason for delayed health-seeking was lockdown and fear of contracting infection, resulting in 44.7% of pregnancies with complications. Thirty-two symptomatic women who tested positive for COVID-19 were managed at the center with good maternal and fetal outcomes. CONCLUSION: Although COVID-19 does not directly affect pregnancy outcomes, it has indirect adverse effects on maternal and child health. Emergency obstetric and antenatal care are essential services to be continued with awareness of people while maintaining social distancing and personal hygiene.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Prenatal Care , Time-to-Treatment , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , India , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Prospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
4.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 9(12): 5858-5861, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1022104

ABSTRACT

With the frequently changing guidelines on Pregnancy care, management of obstetric patients remains a major challenge during COVID-19 Pandemic. The department of Obstetrics and Gynecology had a huge responsibility to provide respectable maternity care to all women irrespective of their virologic status and at the same time protect the frontline warriors dealing with patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic. We would like to share our perspective regarding the challenges faced and the solutions sought for, in both patient care and teaching and research.

5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(12)2020 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991777

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has spread globally. Coinfection with other endemic viruses is likely to complicate the clinical presentation and outcome. Information on clinical manifestations and management strategies on COVID-19 coinfection with endemic diseases in children is yet to evolve. The risk of dengue infection exists in 129 countries and it is endemic in more than 100 countries. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic might overlap with the dengue epidemics in tropical countries. We report the first paediatric case to the best of our knowledge of COVID-19 encephalitis with dengue shock syndrome. This clinical syndrome could be attributed to serological cross-reactivity, incidental coinfection or perhaps a warning for dengue-endemic regions to face the unique challenge of differentiating and managing two disease entities together. Enhanced understanding of potential COVID-19 and dengue coinfection warrants immediate attention of researchers and international health policy makers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dengue Virus/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Dengue/epidemiology , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Female , Humans , Severe Dengue/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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