Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323746

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence shows that periodontal disease (PD) may increase the risk of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complications. Here, we undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, and investigated for the first time the possible causal impact of PD on host susceptibility to COVID-19 and its severity.Methods: Summary statistics of COVID-19 susceptibility and severity was retrieved from the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative and used as outcomes in this study. As for exposures, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significant variants from genome wide association study (GWAS) of PD were included in the MR analysis. Inverse-variance weighted (IVW) method was employed as the main approach to analyzing the causal relationships between PD and COVID-19. Three additional methods were adopted, allowing the existence of horizontal pleiotropy including MR-Egger regression, weighted median and weighted mode methods. Comprehensive sensitivity analyses were also conducted for estimating the robustness of the identified associations.Findings: The MR estimates showed that PD was markedly associated with a higher susceptibility to COVID-19 using IVW (OR = 1.024, P = 0.017) and weighted median method (OR = 1.029, P = 0.024). Furthermore, it revealed that PD was significantly linked to COVID-19 severity based on the comparison of hospitalization versus population controls (IVW: OR = 1.025, P = 0.039;weighted median, OR = 1.030, P = 0.027). No such association was observed in the cohort of highly severe cases confirmed versus those not hospitalized due to COVID-19.Interpretation: This study provides genetic evidence on the possible causality of periodontal disease accounting for the host susceptibility to COVID-19 and its severity, thereby highlighting the importance of disease prevention and oral/periodontal healthcare for general wellbeing during the pandemic and beyond.Funding Information: This work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province (LY18H160050, LQ20H140002), Medical and Health Science and Technology Planning Project of Zhejiang Province (2018KY518), National Natural Science Foundation of China (31771390, 81972261, 32070151), Wenzhou Science and Technology Bureau (ZY2020007, 2020Y0536, Y20190147).Declaration of Interests: The authors declare that no competing interests exist.Ethics Approval Statement: This study only used publicly available data and the relevant ethical approval can be found in the corresponding studies referenced in the Methods section.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313354

ABSTRACT

Background: To identify alarming symptoms that could potentially lead to severe form of COVID-19 pneumonia (i.e. novel coronavirus pneumonia: NCP), a disease that is now having pandemic spread. Methods: : Articles from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane database and Google up to 24 February 2020 were systematically reviewed. 18 publications that had documented cases of COVID-19 pneumonia were identified. The relevant data were extracted, systematically reviewed and further evaluated using meta-analysis. We define severe COVID-19 pneumonia as the disease status that requires admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and respiratory/circulatory support, which is in align with the guideline from the World Health Organization (WHO). Results: : 14 studies including 1,424 patients were considered eligible and analyzed. Symptoms such as fever (89.2%), cough (67.2%), fatigue (43.6%) were quite common;but dizziness, hemoptysis, abdominal pain and conjunctival congestion/conjunctivitis were relatively rare. The incidence of dyspnea was significantly higher in patients with severe than non-severe COVID-19 pneumonia (42.7% vs.16.3%, p<0.0001). Similarly, fever and diarrhea were also drastically more common in patients with severe form (p=0.0374 and 0.0267). Further meta-analysis using three high-quality China-based studies confirmed such findings and showed that dyspnea, fever and diarrhea were 3.53 (OR: 3.53, 95%CI: 1.95-6.38), 1.70 (OR: 1.70, 95%CI: 1.01-2.87), and 1.80 (OR: 1.80, 95%CI: 1.06-3.03) folds higher respectively in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Conclusion: Dyspnea, fever and diarrhea are significantly more prevalent in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, suggesting they are alarming symptoms that warrant close attention and timely management.

3.
Cell Biosci ; 12(1): 15, 2022 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thrombosis and coagulopathy are pervasive pathological features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and thrombotic complications are a sign of severe COVID-19 disease and are associated with multiple organ failure and increased mortality. Platelets are essential cells that regulate hemostasis, thrombus formation and inflammation; however, the mechanism underlying the interaction between platelets and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains unclear. RESULTS: The present study performed RNA sequencing on the RNA isolated from platelets obtained from 10 COVID-19 patients and eight healthy donors, and discovered that SARS-CoV-2 not only significantly altered the coding and non-coding transcriptional landscape, but also altered the function of the platelets, promoted thrombus formation and affected energy metabolism of platelets. Integrative network biology analysis identified four key subnetworks and 16 risk regulators underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection, involved in coronavirus disease-COVID-19, platelet activation and immune response pathways. Furthermore, four risk genes (upstream binding transcription factor, RNA polymerase II, I and III subunit L, Y-box binding protein 1 and yippee like 2) were found to be associated with COVID-19 severity. Finally, a significant alteration in the von Willebrand factor/glycoprotein Ib-IX-V axis was revealed to be strongly associated with platelet aggregation and immunothrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional landscape and the identification of critical subnetworks and risk genes of platelets provided novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of immunothrombosis in COVID-19 progression, which may pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for preventing COVID-19-associated thrombosis and improving the clinical outcome of COVID-19 patients.

4.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 528, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence shows that periodontal disease (PD) may increase the risk of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complications. Here, we undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, and investigated for the first time the possible causal impact of PD on host susceptibility to COVID-19 and its severity. METHODS: Summary statistics of COVID-19 susceptibility and severity were retrieved from the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative and used as outcomes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with PD in Genome-wide association study were included as exposure. Inverse-variance weighted (IVW) method was employed as the main approach to analyze the causal relationships between PD and COVID-19. Three additional methods were adopted, allowing the existence of horizontal pleiotropy, including MR-Egger regression, weighted median and weighted mode methods. Comprehensive sensitivity analyses were also conducted for estimating the robustness of the identified associations. RESULTS: The MR estimates showed that PD was significantly associated with significantly higher susceptibility to COVID-19 using IVW (OR = 1.024, P = 0.017, 95% CI 1.004-1.045) and weighted median method (OR = 1.029, P = 0.024, 95% CI 1.003-1.055). Furthermore, it revealed that PD was significantly linked to COVID-19 severity based on the comparison of hospitalization versus population controls (IVW, OR = 1.025, P = 0.039, 95% CI 1.001-1.049; weighted median, OR = 1.030, P = 0.027, 95% CI 1.003-1.058). No such association was observed in the cohort of highly severe cases confirmed versus those not hospitalized due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: We provide evidence on the possible causality of PD accounting for the susceptibility and severity of COVID-19, highlighting the importance of oral/periodontal healthcare for general wellbeing during the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Periodontal Diseases , COVID-19/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Periodontal Diseases/complications , Periodontal Diseases/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
5.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 114(1): 47-55, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592286

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has resulted in a global health emergency. In addition to common respiratory symptoms, some patients with COVID-19 infections may experience a range of extra-pulmonary manifestations, such as digestive system involvement. Patients with COVID-19 have been reported to suffer from acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) that is associated with disease-related severity and mortality. However, in the context of COVID-19, the exact cause of AMI has yet to be clearly defined. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the available data and elucidates the possible underlying mechanisms linking COVID-19 to AMI, in addition to highlighting therapeutic approaches for clinicians. Finally, given the severe global impact of COVID-19, we emphasize the importance of coordinated vaccination programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mesenteric Ischemia , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lung , Mesenteric Ischemia/etiology , Mesenteric Ischemia/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-894

ABSTRACT

Background: The epidemic characteristic of COVID-19 outside Wuhan was still unclear. We report the epidemiological, clinical, treatment and prognosis of COVID-

9.
Clin Transl Sci ; 13(6): 1096-1102, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742071

ABSTRACT

This open-label randomized controlled pilot study aimed to test the study feasibility of bromhexine hydrochloride (BRH) tablets for the treatment of mild or moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to explore its clinical efficacy and safety. Patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 were randomly divided into the BRH group or the control group at a 2:1 ratio. Routine treatment according to China's Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia Diagnosis and Treatment Plan was performed in both groups, whereas patients in the BRH group were additionally given oral BRH (32 mg t.i.d.) for 14 consecutive days. The efficacy and safety of BRH were evaluated. A total of 18 patients with moderate COVID-19 were randomized into the BRH group (n = 12) or the control group (n = 6). There were suggestions of BRH advantage over placebo in improved chest computed tomography, need for oxygen therapy, and discharge rate within 20 days. However, none of these findings were statistically significant. BRH tablets may potentially have a beneficial effect in patients with COVID-19, especially for those with lung or hepatic injury. A further definitive large-scale clinical trial is feasible and necessary.


Subject(s)
Bromhexine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Bromhexine/adverse effects , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Tablets
10.
RSC Adv ; 10(47): 28041-28048, 2020 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733505

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has quickly spread all over the world. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for nucleic acid detection has become the standard method for clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. But these rRT-PCR tests have many inherent limitations, and carry a high false negative rate. It is an urgent to develop a method to accurately identify the vast infected patients and asymptomatic viral carriers from the population. In this article, we present the principle and procedure of developing a colloidal gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA) for rapid detection of COVID-19-specific antibodies. The detection kit can be used to detect immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG of COVID-19 in human blood samples within 15 minutes, and to identify different stages of viral infection. Test results can be digitalized using an office scanner and a FiJi software with appropriate confidence interval (CI) setting. Based on analysis from 375 samples, we calculated that overall sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 95.85% and 97.47%, respectively. Compared with rRT-PCR, this assay has many advantages including convenience and rapid detection. The detection kit can be widely used in hospitals, clinics and laboratories for rapid screening of both symptomatic and asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers in large scale.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL