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1.
EBioMedicine ; 75: 103789, 2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term consequences of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) treatment for COVID-19 patients are yet to be reported. This study assessed the 1-year outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19, who were recruited in our previous UC-MSC clinical trial. METHODS: In this prospective, longitudinal, cohort study, 100 patients enrolled in our phase 2 trial were prospectively followed up at 3-month intervals for 1 year to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of UC-MSC treatment. The primary endpoint was an altered proportion of whole-lung lesion volumes measured by high-resolution CT. Other imaging outcomes, 6 min walking distance (6-MWD), lung function, plasma biomarkers, and adverse events were also recorded and analyzed. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04288102). FINDINGS: MSC administration improved in whole-lung lesion volume compared with the placebo with a difference of -10.8% (95% CI: -20.7%, -1.5%, p = 0.030) on day 10. MSC also reduced the proportion of solid component lesion volume compared with the placebo at each follow-up point. More interestingly, 17.9% (10/56) of patients in the MSC group had normal CT images at month 12, but none in the placebo group (p = 0.013). The incidence of symptoms was lower in the MSC group than in the placebo group at each follow-up time. Neutralizing antibodies were all positive, with a similar median inhibition rate (61.6% vs. 67.6%) in both groups at month 12. No difference in adverse events at the 1-year follow-up and tumor markers at month 12 were observed between the two groups. INTERPRETATION: UC-MSC administration achieves a long-term benefit in the recovery of lung lesions and symptoms in COVID-19 patients. FUNDING: The National Key R&D Program of China, the Innovation Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the National Science and Technology Major Project.

3.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(11)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526804

ABSTRACT

In 1911, Peyton Rous (Nobel Prize winner in 1966) demonstrated that a virus (i.e., RSV) caused cancer in chickens. In 1976, Bishop and Varmus (Nobel Prize winners in 1989) showed that the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes was actually normal cellular genes (i.e., proto-oncogenes). In this article, we revisit the role viruses play in the genetic origin of cancer. We review a link between viruses or cancer and autoimmunity in an alternative stem cell origin of cancer. We propose that a virus is more likely to cause cancer when it infects a progenitor stem-like cell rather than a progeny differentiated cell. We postulate that both known (e.g., HBV and HPV) and novel viruses (e.g., SARS-CoV-2) pose an imminent threat in the emergence of chronic viral diseases as well as virally induced malignancies. Knowing the origin of cancer has profound implications on our current conception and perception of cancer. It affects our conduct in cancer research and our delivery of cancer care. It would be ironic if viruses turn out to be a useful tool and an ideal means in our quest to verify a genetic versus stem cell origin of cancer. When it pertains, oncology recapitulates ontogeny; although genetic makeup is pivotal, cellular context may be paramount to elucidating a stem cell origin of cancer.

4.
Mil Med Res ; 8(1): 51, 2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416822

ABSTRACT

To determine the prevalence and clinical features of olfactory and taste disorders among coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients in China. A cross-sectional study was performed in Wuhan from April 3, 2020 to April 15, 2020. A total of 187 patients with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) completed face-to-face interviews or telephone follow-ups. We found that the prevalence of olfactory and taste disorders was significantly lower in the Chinese cohort than in foreign COVID-19 cohorts. Females were more prone to olfactory and taste disorders. In some patients, olfactory and taste disorders precede other symptoms and can be used as early screening and warning signs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Smell , Taste Disorders/etiology , Taste , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Taste Disorders/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol ; 259(9): 2813-2820, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318757

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine myopia progression in children during the COVID-19 and the related factors associated with myopia. METHODS: All subjects underwent three-timepoint ocular examinations that were measured in July 2019, January, and August 2020. We compared the changes in uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), mydriatic spherical equivalent (SE), and axial length (AL) between two periods (before and during COVID-19). A questionnaire was performed to investigate risk factors for myopia. RESULTS: Compared with before the COVID-19, the mean (S.D.) myopia progression during the COVID-19 was significantly higher in right eyes (- 0.93 (0.65) vs. - 0.33 (0.47) D; p < 0.001). However, the differences in UCVA changes and the axial elongation between two periods were clinically insignificant. Through logistic regressive analysis, we found the difference of the SE changes was associated with the baseline AL (P = 0.028; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.058, 2.632), online education (P = 0.02; 95% CI, 1.587, 8.665), and time of digital screen (p < 0.005; 95% CI, 1.587, 4.450). CONCLUSIONS: Children were at higher risk of myopia progression during COVID-19, which was associated with the baseline AL, the longtime online learning, and digital screen reading.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myopia , Child , China/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Humans , Myopia/diagnosis , Myopia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Refraction, Ocular , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 655604, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282393

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Diabetes is a risk factor for poor COVID-19 prognosis. The analysis of related prognostic factors in diabetic patients with COVID-19 would be helpful for further treatment of such patients. Methods: This retrospective study involved 3623 patients with COVID-19 (325 with diabetes). Clinical characteristics and laboratory tests were collected and compared between the diabetic group and the non-diabetic group. Binary logistic regression analysis was applied to explore risk factors associated in diabetic patients with COVID-19. A prediction model was built based on these risk factors. Results: The risk factors for higher mortality in diabetic patients with COVID-19 were dyspnea, lung disease, cardiovascular diseases, neutrophil, PLT count, and CKMB. Similarly, dyspnea, cardiovascular diseases, neutrophil, PLT count, and CKMB were risk factors related to the severity of diabetes with COVID-19. Based on these factors, a risk score was built to predict the severity of disease in diabetic patients with COVID-19. Patients with a score of 7 or higher had an odds ratio of 7.616. Conclusions: Dyspnea is a critical clinical manifestation that is closely related to the severity of disease in diabetic patients with COVID-19. Attention should also be paid to the neutrophil, PLT count and CKMB levels after admission.

7.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
8.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248957, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146198

ABSTRACT

The characteristics and evolution of pulmonary fibrosis in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have not been adequately studied. AI-assisted chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was used to investigate the proportion of COVID-19 patients with pulmonary fibrosis, the relationship between the degree of fibrosis and the clinical classification of COVID-19, the characteristics of and risk factors for pulmonary fibrosis, and the evolution of pulmonary fibrosis after discharge. The incidence of pulmonary fibrosis in patients with severe or critical COVID-19 was significantly higher than that in patients with moderate COVID-19. There were significant differences in the degree of pulmonary inflammation and the extent of the affected area among patients with mild, moderate and severe pulmonary fibrosis. The IL-6 level in the acute stage and albumin level were independent risk factors for pulmonary fibrosis. Ground-glass opacities, linear opacities, interlobular septal thickening, reticulation, honeycombing, bronchiectasis and the extent of the affected area were significantly improved 30, 60 and 90 days after discharge compared with at discharge. The more severe the clinical classification of COVID-19, the more severe the residual pulmonary fibrosis was; however, in most patients, pulmonary fibrosis was improved or even resolved within 90 days after discharge.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 58, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078577

ABSTRACT

Treatment of severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is challenging. We performed a phase 2 trial to assess the efficacy and safety of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) to treat severe COVID-19 patients with lung damage, based on our phase 1 data. In this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial, we recruited 101 severe COVID-19 patients with lung damage. They were randomly assigned at a 2:1 ratio to receive either UC-MSCs (4 × 107 cells per infusion) or placebo on day 0, 3, and 6. The primary endpoint was an altered proportion of whole lung lesion volumes from baseline to day 28. Other imaging outcomes, 6-minute walk test (6-MWT), maximum vital capacity, diffusing capacity, and adverse events were recorded and analyzed. In all, 100 COVID-19 patients were finally received either UC-MSCs (n = 65) or placebo (n = 35). UC-MSCs administration exerted numerical improvement in whole lung lesion volume from baseline to day 28 compared with the placebo (the median difference was -13.31%, 95% CI -29.14%, 2.13%, P = 0.080). UC-MSCs significantly reduced the proportions of solid component lesion volume compared with the placebo (median difference: -15.45%; 95% CI -30.82%, -0.39%; P = 0.043). The 6-MWT showed an increased distance in patients treated with UC-MSCs (difference: 27.00 m; 95% CI 0.00, 57.00; P = 0.057). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. These results suggest that UC-MSCs treatment is a safe and potentially effective therapeutic approach for COVID-19 patients with lung damage. A phase 3 trial is required to evaluate effects on reducing mortality and preventing long-term pulmonary disability. (Funded by The National Key R&D Program of China and others. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04288102.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , SARS-CoV-2 , Umbilical Cord , Aged , Allografts , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
10.
Ther Apher Dial ; 25(1): 55-65, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-936606

ABSTRACT

HD care may experience great stress with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A modified HD modality named bed-sided short-duration renal replacement therapy (BSRRT) was used in noncritical maintenance HD (MHD) patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in Wuhan due to extreme situation. To determine the safety and efficacy as a substitution for intermittent HD (IHD), we conducted this study. We used the data of 88 noncritical COVID-19 MHD patients collected from 65 medical units at the hospitals in Wuhan, China, from January 1 to March 10, 2020. t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Fisher exact probability method were used to compare the baseline characteristics, treatment, and death. Log-rank test and Cox regression multivariate analysis was used to compare the survival of noncritical patients who were transferred to BSRRT modality versus those who were continued on the IHD. Univariate analysis showed the level of reported fatigue symptom at present, bilateral lung computed tomography infiltration and steroid treatment differed between the two groups. The outcome of death of the two groups did not show significant differences in univariate analysis (P = .0563). Multivariate Cox regression analysis dialysis showed modality of treatment after COVID-19 diagnosis was not a significant predictor of death (P = .1000). These data suggest that for noncritical COVID-19 MHD patients, the transfer from IHD to BSRRT does not have significant difference in the risk of death compared with IHD group. This finding suggests this modified modality could be an option for the substitution for IHD during the COVID-19 pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Point-of-Care Systems , Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
bioRxiv ; 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808982

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly contagious virus that underlies the current COVID-19 pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 is thought to disable various features of host immunity and cellular defense. The SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural protein 1 (Nsp1) is known to inhibit host protein translation and could be a target for antiviral therapy against COVID-19. However, how SARS-CoV-2 circumvents this translational blockage for the production of its own proteins is an open question. Here, we report a bipartite mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp1 which operates by: (1) hijacking the host ribosome via direct interaction of its C-terminal domain (CT) with the 40S ribosomal subunit and (2) specifically lifting this inhibition for SARS-CoV-2 via a direct interaction of its N-terminal domain (NT) with the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA. We show that while Nsp1-CT is sufficient for binding to 40S and inhibition of host protein translation, the 5' UTR of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA removes this inhibition by binding to Nsp1-NT, suggesting that the Nsp1-NT-UTR interaction is incompatible with the Nsp1-CT-40S interaction. Indeed, lengthening the linker between Nsp1-NT and Nsp1-CT of Nsp1 progressively reduced the ability of SARS-CoV-2 5' UTR to escape the translational inhibition, supporting that the incompatibility is likely steric in nature. The short SL1 region of the 5' UTR is required for viral mRNA translation in the presence of Nsp1. Thus, our data provide a comprehensive view on how Nsp1 switches infected cells from host mRNA translation to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA translation, and that Nsp1 and 5' UTR may be targeted for anti-COVID-19 therapeutics.

16.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 172, 2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733534

ABSTRACT

No effective drug treatments are available for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Host-directed therapies targeting the underlying aberrant immune responses leading to pulmonary tissue damage, death, or long-term functional disability in survivors require clinical evaluation. We performed a parallel assigned controlled, non-randomized, phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) infusions in the treatment of patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 pulmonary disease. The study enrolled 18 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (n = 9 for each group). The treatment group received three cycles of intravenous infusion of UC-MSCs (3 × 107 cells per infusion) on days 0, 3, and 6. Both groups received standard COVID-treatment regimens. Adverse events, duration of clinical symptoms, laboratory parameters, length of hospitalization, serial chest computed tomography (CT) images, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, dynamics of cytokines, and IgG and IgM anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were analyzed. No serious UC-MSCs infusion-associated adverse events were observed. Two patients receiving UC-MSCs developed transient facial flushing and fever, and one patient developed transient hypoxia at 12 h post UC-MSCs transfusion. Mechanical ventilation was required in one patient in the treatment group compared with four in the control group. All patients recovered and were discharged. Our data show that intravenous UC-MSCs infusion in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 is safe and well tolerated. Phase 2/3 randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials with long-term follow-up are needed to evaluate the therapeutic use of UC-MSCs to reduce deaths and improve long-term treatment outcomes in patients with serious COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Combinations , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/drug effects , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Lopinavir , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial , Ritonavir , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
17.
Nat Immunol ; 21(9): 1107-1118, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710376

ABSTRACT

In coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, the relationship between disease severity and the host immune response is not fully understood. Here we performed single-cell RNA sequencing in peripheral blood samples of 5 healthy donors and 13 patients with COVID-19, including moderate, severe and convalescent cases. Through determining the transcriptional profiles of immune cells, coupled with assembled T cell receptor and B cell receptor sequences, we analyzed the functional properties of immune cells. Most cell types in patients with COVID-19 showed a strong interferon-α response and an overall acute inflammatory response. Moreover, intensive expansion of highly cytotoxic effector T cell subsets, such as CD4+ effector-GNLY (granulysin), CD8+ effector-GNLY and NKT CD160, was associated with convalescence in moderate patients. In severe patients, the immune landscape featured a deranged interferon response, profound immune exhaustion with skewed T cell receptor repertoire and broad T cell expansion. These findings illustrate the dynamic nature of immune responses during disease progression.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antigens, CD/genetics , Antigens, CD/immunology , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/genetics , GPI-Linked Proteins/immunology , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
18.
Med. J. Chin. Peoples Liberation Army ; 5(45): 475-480, 20200528.
Article in Chinese | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-701007

ABSTRACT

Objective To provide a basis for further optimizing the diagnosis and treatment strategies of severe and critical corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by investigating and analyzing the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the death cases. Methods The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 47 death cases obtained from Huoshenshan Hospital in Whuhan, Hubei Province were retrospectively analyzed. Results All the patients developed initial symptoms in Wuhan. The time from onset to admission was (12.60±5.60) days. Most of them were male (68.09%) with non-nosocomial infection (91.49%), advanced age (>60 years, 89.36%). Over half of the cases (51.06%) reported a history of contact with suspected or confirmed patients, and comorbidity of chronic diseases (70.21%). Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) occurred in 29 cases (61.70%) with heart failure (51.06%) and renal failure (36.17%). The main clinical symptoms included fever, fatigue, dyspnea and cough. At admission,most cases were severe (55.32%) or critical (42.55%), and the in-hospital survival was longer for the severe than for the critical (P=0.02). 76.59% of the patients received invasive mechanical ventilation, and they had a longer in-hospital survival than those with non-invasive mechanical ventilation (P<0.05). Conclusions This group of cases occurred during the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, characterized by male, elder and history of chronic diseases. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by COVID-19 was responsible for patients' death, and MODS manifestated by heart and kidney failure also implicated in the process. Disease severity and invasive mechanical ventilation were related to in-hospital survival.

19.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3410, 2020 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635899

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is associated with 5.1% mortality. Although the virological, epidemiological, clinical, and management outcome features of COVID-19 patients have been defined rapidly, the inflammatory and immune profiles require definition as they influence pathogenesis and clinical expression of COVID-19. Here we show lymphopenia, selective loss of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells, excessive T-cell activation and high expression of T-cell inhibitory molecules are more prominent in severe cases than in those with mild disease. CD8+ T cells in patients with severe disease express high levels of cytotoxic molecules. Histochemical studies of lung tissue from one fatality show sub-anatomical distributions of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and massive infiltration of T cells and macrophages. Thus, aberrant activation and dysregulation of CD8+ T cells occur in patients with severe COVID-19 disease, an effect that might be for pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and indicate that immune-based targets for therapeutic interventions constitute a promising treatment for severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Biomarkers/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19 , Chemotaxis, Leukocyte , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Leukocyte Count , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Cell Metab ; 32(2): 188-202.e5, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612608

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presents an unprecedented threat to global public health. Herein, we utilized a combination of targeted and untargeted tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the plasma lipidome and metabolome in mild, moderate, and severe COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. A panel of 10 plasma metabolites effectively distinguished COVID-19 patients from healthy controls (AUC = 0.975). Plasma lipidome of COVID-19 resembled that of monosialodihexosyl ganglioside (GM3)-enriched exosomes, with enhanced levels of sphingomyelins (SMs) and GM3s, and reduced diacylglycerols (DAGs). Systems evaluation of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19 was performed using multiscale embedded differential correlation network analyses. Using exosomes isolated from the same cohort, we demonstrated that exosomes of COVID-19 patients with elevating disease severity were increasingly enriched in GM3s. Our work suggests that GM3-enriched exosomes may partake in pathological processes related to COVID-19 pathogenesis and presents the largest repository on the plasma lipidome and metabolome distinct to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Exosomes/metabolism , G(M3) Ganglioside/blood , Gangliosides/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19 , Diglycerides/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolome/physiology , Metabolomics/methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sphingomyelins/blood , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Young Adult
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