Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
mBio ; 13(2): e0040222, 2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765083

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection triggers cytokine-mediated inflammation, leading to a myriad of clinical presentations in COVID-19. The SARS-CoV-2 open reading frame 8 (ORF8) is a secreted and rapidly evolving glycoprotein. Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 variants with ORF8 deleted are associated with mild disease outcomes, but the molecular mechanism behind this is unknown. Here, we report that SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 is a viral cytokine that is similar to but distinct from interleukin 17A (IL-17A) as it induces stronger and broader human IL-17 receptor (hIL-17R) signaling than IL-17A. ORF8 primarily targeted blood monocytes and induced the heterodimerization of hIL-17RA and hIL-17RC, triggering a robust inflammatory response. Transcriptome analysis revealed that besides its activation of the hIL-17R pathway, ORF8 upregulated gene expression for fibrosis signaling and coagulation dysregulation. A naturally occurring ORF8 L84S variant that was highly associated with mild COVID-19 showed reduced hIL-17RA binding and attenuated inflammatory responses. This study reveals how SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 by a viral mimicry of the IL-17 cytokine contributes to COVID-19 severe inflammation. IMPORTANCE Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 variants lacking open reading frame 8 (ORF8) have been associated with milder infection and disease outcome, but the molecular mechanism behind how this viral accessory protein mediates disease pathogenesis is not yet known. In our study, we revealed that secreted ORF8 protein mimics host IL-17 to activate IL-17 receptors A and C (IL-17RA/C) and induces a significantly stronger inflammatory response than host IL-17A, providing molecular insights into the role of ORF8 in COVID-19 pathogenesis and serving as a potential therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Interleukin-17/genetics , Open Reading Frames , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
2.
mBio ; 11(3)2020 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723548

ABSTRACT

Due to the urgent need of a therapeutic treatment for coronavirus (CoV) disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, a number of FDA-approved/repurposed drugs have been suggested as antiviral candidates at clinics, without sufficient information. Furthermore, there have been extensive debates over antiviral candidates for their effectiveness and safety against severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV 2 (SARS-CoV-2), suggesting that rapid preclinical animal studies are required to identify potential antiviral candidates for human trials. To this end, the antiviral efficacies of lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine sulfate, and emtricitabine-tenofovir for SARS-CoV-2 infection were assessed in the ferret infection model. While the lopinavir-ritonavir-, hydroxychloroquine sulfate-, or emtricitabine-tenofovir-treated group exhibited lower overall clinical scores than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated control group, the virus titers in nasal washes, stool specimens, and respiratory tissues were similar between all three antiviral-candidate-treated groups and the PBS-treated control group. Only the emtricitabine-tenofovir-treated group showed lower virus titers in nasal washes at 8 days postinfection (dpi) than the PBS-treated control group. To further explore the effect of immune suppression on viral infection and clinical outcome, ferrets were treated with azathioprine, an immunosuppressive drug. Compared to the PBS-treated control group, azathioprine-immunosuppressed ferrets exhibited a longer period of clinical illness, higher virus titers in nasal turbinate, delayed virus clearance, and significantly lower serum neutralization (SN) antibody titers. Taken together, all antiviral drugs tested marginally reduced the overall clinical scores of infected ferrets but did not significantly affect in vivo virus titers. Despite the potential discrepancy of drug efficacies between animals and humans, these preclinical ferret data should be highly informative to future therapeutic treatment of COVID-19 patients.IMPORTANCE The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic continues to spread worldwide, with rapidly increasing numbers of mortalities, placing increasing strain on health care systems. Despite serious public health concerns, no effective vaccines or therapeutics have been approved by regulatory agencies. In this study, we tested the FDA-approved drugs lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine sulfate, and emtricitabine-tenofovir against SARS-CoV-2 infection in a highly susceptible ferret infection model. While most of the drug treatments marginally reduced clinical symptoms, they did not reduce virus titers, with the exception of emtricitabine-tenofovir treatment, which led to diminished virus titers in nasal washes at 8 dpi. Further, the azathioprine-treated immunosuppressed ferrets showed delayed virus clearance and low SN titers, resulting in a prolonged infection. As several FDA-approved or repurposed drugs are being tested as antiviral candidates at clinics without sufficient information, rapid preclinical animal studies should proceed to identify therapeutic drug candidates with strong antiviral potential and high safety prior to a human efficacy trial.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Ferrets , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration , Viral Load
3.
J Med Chem ; 65(4): 2880-2904, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705973

ABSTRACT

Starting from the MLPCN probe compound ML300, a structure-based optimization campaign was initiated against the recent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) main protease (3CLpro). X-ray structures of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro enzymes in complex with multiple ML300-based inhibitors, including the original probe ML300, were obtained and proved instrumental in guiding chemistry toward probe compound 41 (CCF0058981). The disclosed inhibitors utilize a noncovalent mode of action and complex in a noncanonical binding mode not observed by peptidic 3CLpro inhibitors. In vitro DMPK profiling highlights key areas where further optimization in the series is required to obtain useful in vivo probes. Antiviral activity was established using a SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero E6 cell viability assay and a plaque formation assay. Compound 41 demonstrates nanomolar activity in these respective assays, comparable in potency to remdesivir. These findings have implications for antiviral development to combat current and future SARS-like zoonotic coronavirus outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Peptidomimetics/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Glutamine/chemistry , Glutamine/pharmacology , Humans , Ketones/chemistry , Ketones/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Models, Molecular , Molecular Structure , Peptidomimetics/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
4.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(11): 100453, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521606

ABSTRACT

While pregnancy increases the risk for severe COVID-19, the clinical and immunological implications of COVID-19 on maternal-fetal health remain unknown. Here, we present the clinical and immunological landscapes of 93 COVID-19 mothers and 45 of their SARS-CoV-2-exposed infants through comprehensive serum proteomics profiling for >1,400 cytokines of their peripheral and cord blood specimens. Prenatal SARS-CoV-2 infection triggers NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory immune activation. Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 show increased inflammation and unique IFN-λ antiviral signaling, with elevated levels of IFNL1 and IFNLR1. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 infection re-shapes maternal immunity at delivery, altering the expression of pregnancy complication-associated cytokines, inducing MMP7, MDK, and ESM1 and reducing BGN and CD209. Finally, COVID-19-exposed infants exhibit induction of T cell-associated cytokines (IL33, NFATC3, and CCL21), while some undergo IL-1ß/IL-18/CASP1 axis-driven neonatal respiratory distress despite birth at term. Our findings demonstrate COVID-19-induced immune rewiring in both mothers and neonates, warranting long-term clinical follow-up to mitigate potential health risks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Inflammation , Proteomics , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/metabolism , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mothers , Pregnancy , Serum/metabolism , Young Adult
5.
J Med Chem ; 65(4): 2880-2904, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340972

ABSTRACT

Starting from the MLPCN probe compound ML300, a structure-based optimization campaign was initiated against the recent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) main protease (3CLpro). X-ray structures of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro enzymes in complex with multiple ML300-based inhibitors, including the original probe ML300, were obtained and proved instrumental in guiding chemistry toward probe compound 41 (CCF0058981). The disclosed inhibitors utilize a noncovalent mode of action and complex in a noncanonical binding mode not observed by peptidic 3CLpro inhibitors. In vitro DMPK profiling highlights key areas where further optimization in the series is required to obtain useful in vivo probes. Antiviral activity was established using a SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero E6 cell viability assay and a plaque formation assay. Compound 41 demonstrates nanomolar activity in these respective assays, comparable in potency to remdesivir. These findings have implications for antiviral development to combat current and future SARS-like zoonotic coronavirus outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Peptidomimetics/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Glutamine/chemistry , Glutamine/pharmacology , Humans , Ketones/chemistry , Ketones/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Models, Molecular , Molecular Structure , Peptidomimetics/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL