Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11855, 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960495

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains to spread worldwide. COVID-19 is characterized by the striking high mortality in elderly; however, its mechanistic insights remain unclear. Systemic thrombosis has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of COVID-19, and lung microangiopathy in association with endothelial cells (ECs) injury has been reported by post-mortem analysis of the lungs. Here, we experimentally investigated the SARS-CoV-2 infection in cultured human ECs, and performed a comparative analysis for post-infection molecular events using early passage and replicative senescent ECs. We found that; (1) SARS-CoV-2 infects ECs but does not replicate and disappears in 72 hours without causing severe cell damage, (2) Senescent ECs are highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection, (3) SARS-CoV-2 infection alters various genes expression, which could cause EC dysfunctions, (4) More genes expression is affected in senescent ECs by SARS-CoV-2 infection than in early passage ECs, which might causes further exacerbated dysfunction in senescent ECs. These data suggest that sustained EC dysfunctions due to SARS-CoV-2 infection may contribute to the microangiopathy in the lungs, leading to deteriorated inflammation and thrombosis in COVID-19. Our data also suggest a possible causative role of EC senescence in the aggravated disease in elder COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Aged , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology
2.
ACS Infect Dis ; 2022 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931305

ABSTRACT

Raman spectroscopy uncovered molecular scale markers of the viral structure of the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant and related viral inactivation mechanisms at the biological interface with silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics. A comparison of Raman spectra collected on the TY11-927 variant (lineage B.1.617.2; simply referred to as the Delta variant henceforth) with those of the JPN/TY/WK-521 variant (lineage B.1.617.1; referred to as the Kappa variant or simply as the Japanese isolate henceforth) revealed the occurrence of key mutations of the spike receptor together with profound structural differences in the molecular structure/symmetry of sulfur-containing amino acid and altered hydrophobic interactions of the tyrosine residue. Additionally, different vibrational fractions of RNA purines and pyrimidines and dissimilar protein secondary structures were also recorded. Despite mutations, hydrolytic reactions at the surface of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics induced instantaneous inactivation of the Delta variant at the same rate as that of the Kappa variant. Contact between virions and micrometric Si3N4 particles yielded post-translational deimination of arginine spike residues, methionine sulfoxidation, tyrosine nitration, and oxidation of RNA purines to form formamidopyrimidines. Si3N4 bioceramics proved to be a safe and effective inorganic compound for instantaneous environmental sanitation.

3.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 9(3): e2103287, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557802

ABSTRACT

The multiple mutations of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus have created variants with structural differences in both their spike and nucleocapsid proteins. While the functional relevance of these mutations is under continuous scrutiny, current findings have documented their detrimental impact in terms of affinity with host receptors, antibody resistance, and diagnostic sensitivity. Raman spectra collected on two British variant sub-types found in Japan (QK002 and QHN001) are compared with that of the original Japanese isolate (JPN/TY/WK-521), and found bold vibrational differences. These included: i) fractions of sulfur-containing amino acid rotamers, ii) hydrophobic interactions of tyrosine phenol ring, iii) apparent fractions of RNA purines and pyrimidines, and iv) protein secondary structures. Building upon molecular scale results and their statistical validations, the authors propose to represent virus variants with a barcode specially tailored on Raman spectrum. Raman spectroscopy enables fast identification of virus variants, while the Raman barcode facilitates electronic recordkeeping and translates molecular characteristics into information rapidly accessible by users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Humans , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , United Kingdom
5.
Molecules ; 26(12)2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270089

ABSTRACT

Potential effects of tea and its constituents on SARS-CoV-2 infection were assessed in vitro. Infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 was decreased to 1/100 to undetectable levels after a treatment with black tea, green tea, roasted green tea, or oolong tea for 1 min. An addition of (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) significantly inactivated SARS-CoV-2, while the same concentration of theasinensin A (TSA) and galloylated theaflavins including theaflavin 3,3'-di-O-gallate (TFDG) had more remarkable anti-viral activities. EGCG, TSA, and TFDG at 1 mM, 40 µM, and 60 µM, respectively, which are comparable to the concentrations of these compounds in tea beverages, significantly reduced infectivity of the virus, viral RNA replication in cells, and secondary virus production from the cells. EGCG, TSA, and TFDG significantly inhibited interaction between recombinant ACE2 and RBD of S protein. These results suggest potential usefulness of tea in prevention of person-to-person transmission of the novel coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biflavonoids/chemistry , Catechin/chemistry , Gallic Acid/analogs & derivatives , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tea/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Biflavonoids/pharmacology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gallic Acid/chemistry , Gallic Acid/pharmacology , Humans , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Tea/metabolism , Vero Cells
6.
Pathogens ; 10(6)2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264502

ABSTRACT

Saliva plays major roles in the human-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV-2. If the virus in saliva in SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals can be rapidly and efficiently inactivated by a beverage, the ingestion of the beverage may attenuate the spread of virus infection within a population. Recently, we reported that SARS-CoV-2 was significantly inactivated by treatment with black tea, green tea, roasted green tea and oolong tea, as well as their constituents, (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), theasinensin A (TSA), and galloylated theaflavins. However, it remains unclear to what extent tea inactivates the virus present in saliva, because saliva contains various proteins, nitrogenous products, electrolytes, and so on, which could influence the antivirus effect of tea. Here, we assessed whether tea inactivated the SARS-CoV-2 which was added in human saliva. A virus was added in healthy human saliva in vitro, and after treatment with black tea or green tea, the infectivity of the virus was evaluated by TCID50 assays. The virus titer fell below the detectable level or less than 1/100 after treatment with black tea or green tea for 10 s. The black tea-treated virus less remarkably replicated in cells compared with the untreated virus. These findings suggest the possibility that the ingestion of tea may inactivate SARS-CoV-2 in saliva in infected individuals, although clinical studies are required to determine the intensity and duration of the anti-viral effect of tea in saliva in humans.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL