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1.
Saudi Pharm J ; 30(7): 1009-1017, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878301

ABSTRACT

Background: The study aimed to assess burnout, resilience, and levels of depression, anxiety, stress and fear among community pharmacists during the pandemic, and examine if fear of COVID-19 is associated with these outcomes of interest. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of community pharmacists in Qatar was conducted. Pharmacists' burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory: Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel (MBI-HSS™ for MP-Mindgarden). Resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (CD-RISC-10). Depression, anxiety, and stress were measured by the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Fear of COVID-19 was assessed by the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Results: 256 respondents completed the survey and were included in the final study analysis (response rate: 42.7%). Overall, participants reported a moderate level of burnout as illustrated in the mean scores of the three burnout dimensions; 20.54 (SD = 12.37) for emotional exhaustion, 6.76 (SD = 6.22) for depersonalization, and 36.57 (SD = 9.95) for personal accomplishment. Moreover, depression, anxiety and stress were reported by 44.8%, 53.2% and 25.4% of particiants respectively. Participants had shown moderate resilience (mean score: 27.64 (SD = 8.31)) and their mean score fear of COVID19 was 15.67 (SD = 6.54). Fear of COVID-19 was a statistically significant and an independent predictor of depression, anxiety, and stress levels. Conclusions: The pharmacists experienced moderate burnout but moderate resilience, which indicates their potential to overcome difficulties. Future interventions at the personal, national and organizational levels are required to enhance the pharmacists' wellbeing by decreasing stress, improving self-efficacy and resilience, and preventing burnout.

2.
J Pers Med ; 11(9)2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410096

ABSTRACT

There have been numerous concerns regarding the physical and mental health of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Stress, sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression potentiated nurses' vulnerability to poor eating habits. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore the differences between nurses' characteristics with COVID-19 facility designation, and sleep quality, depression, anxiety, stress, eating habits, social bonds, and quality of life. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, comparative study. METHODS: An online survey was sent using the corporation's email to nurses working in three hospitals in Qatar from September to December 2020. One of them is a designated COVID-19 facility. The sleep quality, depression, eating habits, social bonds, and quality of life were measured using The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21), Emotional Eater Questionnaire (EEQ), Oslo Social Support Scale (OSSS-3), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. RESULTS: A total of 200 nurses participated in the study (RR: 13.3%). No statistically significant association was found between designated facility (COVID-19 vs. not COVID-19) or nurses' characteristics and ISI categories (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.54, 2.44). Nurses working in COVID-19 facilities had increased odds of having higher EEQ categories by 2.62 times (95% CI 1.18, 5.83). Similarly, no statistically significant associations were found between any of the nurses' characteristics and OSSS-3 categories. On the other hand, no statistically significant associations were found between any of the nurses' characteristics and QOL domains except for the gender and social relationships' domain. CONCLUSION: Overall, the quality of life of nurses in Qatar is on a positive level whether they are assigned to a COVID-19 facility or not. Although no significant difference was found with regard to the sleep quality, stress, anxiety, depression, and eating habits between nurses in a COVID-19 facility and in a non-COVID-19 facility, special interventions to diminish stressors need to be implemented and maintained.

3.
Comput Methods Programs Biomed ; 209: 106301, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330710

ABSTRACT

Mathematical model-based analysis has proven its potential as a critical tool in the battle against COVID-19 by enabling better understanding of the disease transmission dynamics, deeper analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various scenarios, and more accurate forecast of the trends with and without interventions. However, due to the outpouring of information and disparity between reported mathematical models, there exists a need for a more concise and unified discussion pertaining to the mathematical modeling of COVID-19 to overcome related skepticism. Towards this goal, this paper presents a review of mathematical model-based scenario analysis and interventions for COVID-19 with the main objectives of (1) including a brief overview of the existing reviews on mathematical models, (2) providing an integrated framework to unify models, (3) investigating various mitigation strategies and model parameters that reflect the effect of interventions, (4) discussing different mathematical models used to conduct scenario-based analysis, and (5) surveying active control methods used to combat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Theoretical , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurs Open ; 8(6): 3516-3526, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216199

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aims to explore the lived experiences of frontline nurses providing nursing care for COVID-19 patients in Qatar. DESIGN: Qualitative, Phenomenological. METHODS: Nurses were recruited from a designated COVID-19 facility using purposive and snowball sampling. The participants were interviewed face-to-face using semi-structured interview questions from 6 September-10 October 2020. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. RESULT: A total of 30 nurses were interviewed; (76.7%) were deployed for >6 months. Three major themes were drawn from the analysis: (a) Challenges of working in a COVID-19 facility (subthemes: working in a new context and new working environment, worn out by the workload, the struggle of wearing protective gear, fear of COVID-19, witnessing suffering); (b) Surviving COVID-19 (subthemes: keeping it safe with extra measures, change in eating habits, teamwork and camaraderie, social support); and (c) Resilience of Nurses (subthemes: a true calling, a sense of purpose).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Biomed Signal Process Control ; 68: 102676, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210845

ABSTRACT

Globally, informed decision on the most effective set of restrictions for the containment of COVID-19 has been the subject of intense debates. There is a significant need for a structured dynamic framework to model and evaluate different intervention scenarios and how they perform under different national characteristics and constraints. This work proposes a novel optimal decision support framework capable of incorporating different interventions to minimize the impact of widely spread respiratory infectious pandemics, including the recent COVID-19, by taking into account the pandemic's characteristics, the healthcare system parameters, and the socio-economic aspects of the community. The theoretical framework underpinning this work involves the use of a reinforcement learning-based agent to derive constrained optimal policies for tuning a closed-loop control model of the disease transmission dynamics.

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