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1.
Children (Basel) ; 10(5)2023 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245499

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential therapeutic role of exercise on health-related quality of life, assessed by the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), coronary flow reserve (CFR), cardiac function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and inflammatory and cardiac blood markers in multisystemic inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) patients. METHODS: This is a case series study of a 12-wk, home-based exercise intervention in children and adolescents after MIS-C diagnosis. From 16 MIS-C patients followed at our clinic, 6 were included (age: 7-16 years; 3 females). Three of them withdrew before the intervention and served as controls. The primary outcome was health-related quality of life, assessed PODCI. Secondary outcomes were CFR assessed by 13N-ammonia PET-CT imaging, cardiac function by echocardiography, cardiorespiratory fitness, and inflammatory and cardiac blood markers. RESULTS: In general, patients showed poor health-related quality of life, which seemed to be improved with exercise. Additionally, exercised patients showed improvements in coronary flow reserve, cardiac function, and aerobic conditioning. Non-exercised patients exhibited a slower pattern of recovery, particularly in relation to health-related quality of life and aerobic conditioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that exercise may play a therapeutic role in the treatment of post-discharge MIS-C patients. As our design does not allow inferring causality, randomized controlled trials are necessary to confirm these preliminary findings.

2.
Front Nutr ; 10: 1141845, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235331

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic impacts on eating habits among adolescents may be more relevant in pediatric patients with immunocompromised chronic diseases. This case-control study conducted between June and October 2020 aimed to: (i) describe dietary patterns of adolescents with chronic conditions compared to healthy controls and (ii) determine associations between food consumption, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (184 immunocompromised and 58 healthy adolescents, aged 14.3 [SD 2.5]) responded to HRQL and sleep validated instruments (PedsQL and PSQI) and three 24 h food recalls via online software. Adjusted linear and logistic regressions were used to assess differences in dietary patterns and associations between food consumption (according to Nova classification) and HRQL and sleep quality. Adolescents with gastrohepatic, rheumatic, and kidney diseases had an improved dietary pattern vs. their healthy peers, showing greater consumption of unprocessed and minimally processed foods (unstandardized coefficient (b) = 7.35%[95%CI 1.59; 13.1]; b = 15.10%[95%CI 7.00; 23.1]; and b = 11.2%[95%CI 5.68; 16.8]), and lower consumption of ultraprocessed foods (b = -7.53%[95%CI-12.90; -2.18]; b = -11.4%[95%CI-18.90; -3.94]; b = -10.8%[95%CI-16.00; -5.68]). Consumption of culinary ingredients was associated with reduced psychological HRQL in controls (standardized coefficient (ß) = -0.26[95%CI-0.52; -0.004]), and processed food consumption was associated with improved sleep latency in immunocompromised participants (ß = 0.16[95%CI 0.01; 0.31]). These findings suggest diet quality may play a role in HRQL and sleep quality in this population, and may be relevant for clinical practitioners and policy makers when considering the importance of dietary quality in immunocompromised youths.

3.
J Phys Act Health ; : 1-4, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243069

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate the association between physical activity and immunogenicity among SARS-CoV-2 seropositive patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases prior to and following a 2-dose schedule of CoronaVac (Sinovac inactivated vaccine). METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study within an open-label, single-arm, phase 4 vaccination trial conducted in Sao Paulo, Brazil. In this substudy, only SARS-CoV-2 seropositive patients were included. Immunogenicity was assessed by seroconversion rates of total anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 immunoglobulin G (IgG), geometric mean titers of anti-S1/S2 IgG, frequency of positive neutralizing antibodies, and neutralizing activity before and after vaccination. Physical activity was assessed through a questionnaire. Model-based analyses were performed controlling for age (<60 or ≥60 y), sex, body mass index (<25, 25-30, and >30 kg/m2), and use of prednisone, immunosuppressants, and biologics. RESULTS: A total of 180 seropositive autoimmune rheumatic disease patients were included. There was no association between physical activity and immunogenicity before and after vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the positive association between physical activity and greater antibody responses seen in immunocompromised individuals following vaccination is overridden by previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, and does not extend to natural immunity.

4.
International journal of environmental research and public health ; 20(5), 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2276546

ABSTRACT

Background: Social distancing measures designed to contain the COVID-19 pandemic can restrict physical activity, a particular concern for high-risk patient groups. We assessed rheumatoid arthritis patients' physical activity and sedentary behavior level, pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life prior to and during the social distancing measures implemented in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: Post-menopausal females diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis were assessed before (from March 2018 to March 2020) and during (from 24 May to 7 July 2020) social distancing measures to contain COVID-19 pandemic, using a within-subjects, repeated-measure design. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were assessed using accelerometry (ActivPAL micro). Pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life were assessed by questionnaires. Results: Mean age was 60.9 years and BMI was 29.5 Kg/m2. Disease activity ranged from remission to moderate activity. During social distancing, there were reductions in light-intensity activity (13.0% [−0.2 h/day, 95% CI: −0.4 to −0.04;p = 0.016]) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (38.8% [−4.5 min/day, 95% CI: −8.1 to −0.9;p = 0.015]), but not in standing time and sedentary time. However, time spent in prolonged bouts of sitting ≥30 min increased by 34% (1.0 h/day, 95% CI: 0.3 to 1.7;p = 0.006) and ≥60 min increased by 85% (1.0 h/day, 95% CI: 0.5 to 1.6). There were no changes in pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life (all p > 0.050). Conclusions: Imposed social distancing measures to contain the COVID-19 outbreak were associated with decreased physical activity and increased prolonged sedentary behavior, but did not change clinical symptoms sitting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social distancing measures designed to contain the COVID-19 pandemic can restrict physical activity, a particular concern for high-risk patient groups. We assessed rheumatoid arthritis patients' physical activity and sedentary behavior level, pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life prior to and during the social distancing measures implemented in Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Post-menopausal females diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis were assessed before (from March 2018 to March 2020) and during (from 24 May to 7 July 2020) social distancing measures to contain COVID-19 pandemic, using a within-subjects, repeated-measure design. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were assessed using accelerometry (ActivPAL micro). Pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life were assessed by questionnaires. RESULTS: Mean age was 60.9 years and BMI was 29.5 Kg/m2. Disease activity ranged from remission to moderate activity. During social distancing, there were reductions in light-intensity activity (13.0% [-0.2 h/day, 95% CI: -0.4 to -0.04; p = 0.016]) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (38.8% [-4.5 min/day, 95% CI: -8.1 to -0.9; p = 0.015]), but not in standing time and sedentary time. However, time spent in prolonged bouts of sitting ≥30 min increased by 34% (1.0 h/day, 95% CI: 0.3 to 1.7; p = 0.006) and ≥60 min increased by 85% (1.0 h/day, 95% CI: 0.5 to 1.6). There were no changes in pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life (all p > 0.050). CONCLUSIONS: Imposed social distancing measures to contain the COVID-19 outbreak were associated with decreased physical activity and increased prolonged sedentary behavior, but did not change clinical symptoms sitting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , Brazil , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Accelerometry , Fatigue/complications , Pain/complications
6.
J Phys Act Health ; 20(4): 311-316, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical activity associates with improved immunogenicity following a 2-dose schedule of CoronaVac (Sinovac's inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine) in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD). This study evaluates whether physical activity impacts vaccine-induced antibody responses to a booster dose in this population. METHODS: This was a phase-4 trial conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. Patients with ARD underwent a 3-dose schedule of CoronaVac. One month after the booster, we assessed seroconversion rates of anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG, geometric mean titers of anti-S1/S2 IgG, frequency of positive neutralizing antibodies, and neutralizing activity. Physical activity was assessed through questionnaire. RESULTS: Physically active (n = 362) and inactive (n = 278) patients were comparable for most characteristics; however, physically active patients were younger (P < .01) and had a lower frequency of chronic inflammatory arthritis (P < .01). Adjusted models showed that physically active patients had ∼2 times odds of seroconversion rates (OR: 2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.61), ∼22% greater geometric mean titers of anti-S1/S2 IgG (22.09%; 95% confidence interval, 3.91 to 65.60), and ∼7% greater neutralizing activity (6.76%; 95% confidence interval, 2.80 to 10.72) than inactive patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ARD who are physically active have greater odds of experiencing better immunogenicity to a booster dose of CoronaVac. These results support the recommendation of physical activity to improve vaccination responses, particularly for immunocompromised individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , Humans , Antibody Formation , Brazil , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Exercise , Immunoglobulin G , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Scand J Med Sci Sports ; 32(10): 1510-1515, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1949820

ABSTRACT

This prospective cohort study within an open-label, single-arm, phase 4 vaccination trial (clinicaltrials.gov #NCT04754698) aimed to investigate the association between physical activity and persistent anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies 6 months after two-dose schedule of CoronaVac in autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) patients (n = 748). Persistent immunogenicity 6 months after the full-course vaccination was assessed using seroconversion rates of total anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG, geometric mean titers of anti-S1/S2 IgG (GMT), and frequency of positive neutralizing antibodies (NAb). Physical activity was assessed trough questionnaire. Adjusted point estimates from logistic regression models indicated that physically active patients had greater odds of seroconversion rates (OR: 1.5 [95%CI: 1.1 to 2.1]) and NAb positivity (OR: 1.5 [95%CI: 1.0 to 2.1]), and approximately 43% greater GMT (42.8% [95%CI: 11.9 to 82.2]) than inactive ones. In conclusion, among immunocompromised patients, being physically active was associated with an increment in antibody persistence through 6 months after a full-course of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Exercise , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulin G , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Rheumatol ; 41(10): 3189-3198, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1888897

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess mental health and life conditions in adolescents with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) and healthy controls quarantined during COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A cross-sectional study included 155 ARD adolescents and 105 healthy controls. Online survey included self-reported strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), and a semi-structured questionnaire with demographic data, daily home and school routine, physical activities, and COVID-19 information during the pandemic. RESULTS: Among patients, 56% had juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), 29% juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), and 15% juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). No differences were found regarding sex, ethnicity, and current age between ARD patients and controls (p > 0.05). Abnormal emotional SDQ (38% vs. 35%, p = 0.653) were similar in both groups. Logistic regression analyses in ARD patients demonstrated that female (OR = 2.4; 95%CI 1.0-6.0; p = 0.044) was associated with severe emotional SDQ dysfunction, whereas sleep problems were considered as a risk factor for both worse total SDQ (OR = 2.6; 95%CI 1.2-5.5; p = 0.009) and emotional SDQ scores (OR = 4.6; 95%CI 2.2-9.7; p < 0.001). Comparisons between ARD patients with and without current prednisone use showed higher median scores of peer problems in the first group [3 (0-10) vs. 2 (0-7), p = 0.049], whereas similar median and frequencies between JIA, JSLE, and JDM (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately one third of JIA, JSLE, and JDM patients presented abnormal total and emotional scores of SDQ during COVID-19 quarantine. Sleep problems were the main factor associated with emotional difficulties in these ARD adolescents. The knowledge of mental health issues rates in adolescents with ARD supports the development of prevention strategies, like sleep hygiene counseling, as well as the references of the affected patients to specialized mental health services, as necessary. Key Points • One third of ARD patients presented mental health issues during COVID-19 quarantine • Sleep problems were associated with emotional difficulties. • It is necessary to warn pediatric rheumatologists about the importance of sleep hygiene counseling.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile , COVID-19 , Dermatomyositis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Arthritis, Juvenile/complications , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dermatomyositis/complications , Female , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Mental Health , Pandemics , Prednisone , Quarantine
9.
Physiol Rep ; 10(5): e15201, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743019

ABSTRACT

We assessed PET-CT myocardial blood flow (MBF) using N-13 ammonia, brachial flow-mediated dilation, and cardiopulmonary exercise test in five post-discarged MIS-C survivors. None of the patients (median age: 9, range: 7-18 years; 3 females; 2 males) had preexisting pediatric chronic conditions. At the follow-up visit, two patients exhibited severe perfusion defect developed in the left ventricular cavity, suggesting extensive myocardial ischemia (MBF <2.0) and one patient showed persistent mild pericardial effusion. Others two patients demonstrated endothelial dysfunction. Nevertheless, all patients had lower predicted values in the VO2peak , VO2VAT , OUES, and O2 Pulse (range: 35.2%-64.5%; 15.6%-38.2%; 1.0-1.3 L/min; 4-7 ml/beat), respectively. Our d suggested that previously health MIS-C patients had impaired MBF, endothelial dysfunction and lower cardiopulmonary capacity at follow-up analysis. Multidisciplinary further investigations should be conducted to reinforce these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular System , COVID-19/complications , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
10.
Lupus ; 31(4): 443-456, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736231

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the perceptions and acceptability of a home-based exercise intervention in systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) adolescent patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to explore the effects of the intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), sleep quality, and mental health conditions parameters. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial of a 12-week, home-based exercise training program conducted between October and December 2020. During this period, social distancing measures were in place in Brazil to contain the spread of COVID-19. Adolescent patients diagnosed with JSLE and JIA participated in the study. Health-related qualitative and quantitative data were collected before and after the follow-up. RESULTS: 21 JSLE patients and 30 JIA patients were analyzed. Six themes emerged from patients' feedback: 1) Suitability of the home-based format; 2) Appropriate trainer supervision, 3) Motivators and facilitators for the program; 4) Barriers to the program; 5) Health benefits; 6) Patients' suggestions to improve the program. Overall, data indicated that the intervention showed good acceptability and elicited improvements in the perceived HRQoL and fatigue in JIA and JSLE patients during the pandemic. However, further quantitative analyses with validated HRQoL, sleep quality, and mental health conditions instruments did not capture these benefits (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Our main findings based on in-depth qualitative assessments suggest that a home-based exercise training program was suitable and well-accepted by adolescents with JSLE and JIA during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonetheless, adherence was not high, particularly among JIA patients, suggesting that facilitators and barriers identified in the current study should be explored to improve the quality of new home-based exercise programs implementation, particularly in a future emerging crisis.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile/therapy , COVID-19 , Exercise Therapy/methods , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Adolescent , Brazil , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life
11.
J Appl Physiol (1985) ; 132(3): 682-688, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731339

ABSTRACT

This randomized controlled study aimed to investigate whether a single bout of exercise before the homologous booster dose of a SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine could enhance immunogenicity in patients with spondyloarthritis. We selected 60 consecutive patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Patients assigned to the intervention group performed an exercise bout comprising three exercises. Then, they remained at rest for 1 h before vaccination. The control group remained at rest before vaccination. Immunogenicity was assessed before (Pre) and 1 mo after (Post) the booster using seropositivity rates of total anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG, geometric mean titers of anti-S1/S2 IgG (GMT), frequency of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) positivity, and NAb activity. At Pre, 16 patients from the exercise group and 16 patients from the control group exhibited seropositivity for IgG (59% vs. 57.1%), and 1 mo after the booster dose, seropositivity occurred in 96% versus 100% of the cases. Only 10 patients from the exercise group and 12 patients from the control group showed positive NAb serology at Pre (37% vs. 42.8%). One month following the booster, NAb positivity was 96% versus 93%. GMT was comparable between groups at Pre. At Post, GMT increased similarly in both groups. Likewise, NAb activity was similar between groups at Pre and increased similarly in both of them as a result of the booster (47.5% vs. 39.9%). In conclusion, a single bout of exercise did not enhance immunogenicity to a homologous booster dose of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine among patients with spondyloarthritis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We tested the role of exercise as an adjuvant to a booster of a COVID-19 vaccine. Immunocompromised patients were immunized after an acute bout of exercise or not. Patients exhibited an excellent immunogenicity in response to the booster dose. Exercise did not add to the vaccine effects on IgG or neutralizing antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Inactivated
12.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 714120, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595857

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Among healthy adolescents, school closures and home confinement were shown to increase unhealthier eating habits and sedentary behavior. It remains unknown to which extent the pandemic has impacted the lifestyle of adolescents with chronic conditions. Thus, the aim of this study is to report on the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on eating habits and sedentary behavior among adolescents with multiple chronic conditions (n = 347) from a tertiary, referral hospital vs. healthy peers. Methods: This observational study was conducted in São Paulo (Brazil) between July and October 2020, period in which a set of social distancing measures to contain the pandemic. Results: The main findings of this study were that adolescents with chronic conditions and health peers showed important changes in eating habits (e.g., more often cooking and eating in front of television than before quarantine). Also, 86.8% of adolescents with chronic conditions and 91.6% of healthy adolescents reported increasing screen time during pandemic. No major differences were observed between patients and controls. Conclusions: Adolescents with chronic conditions and healthy peers exposed to pandemic showed substantial changes in lifestyle, stressing the need for specific care to mitigate poor eating habits and excessive sedentary behavior for patients and healthy adolescents.

13.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 76: e3501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534496

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the possible factors that influence sleep quality in adolescents with and without chronic immunosuppressive conditions quarantined during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 305 adolescents with chronic immunocompromised conditions and 82 healthy adolescents. Online surveys were completed, which included questions on socio-demographic data and self-rated healthcare routine during COVID-19 quarantine and the following validated questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL4.0), and Pediatric Outcome Data Collection Instrument (PODCI). RESULTS: The median current age [14 (10-18) vs. 15 (10-18) years, p=0.847] and frequency of female sex (62% vs. 58%, p=0.571) were similar in adolescents with chronic conditions compared with healthy adolescents. The frequency of poor sleep quality was similar in both groups (38% vs. 48%, p=0.118). Logistic regression analysis, including both healthy adolescents and adolescents with chronic conditions (n=387), demonstrated that self-reported increase in screen time (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.8; p=0.008) and intrafamilial violence report (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.5; p=0.008) were independently associated with poor sleep quality in these adolescents. However, the PODCI global function score was associated with a lower OR for poor sleep quality (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94-0.99; p=0.001). Further logistic regression, including only adolescents with chronic conditions (n=305), demonstrated that self-reported increase in screen time (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.4-6.8; p=0.006) and intrafamilial violence report (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.4; p=0.011) remained independently associated with poor quality of sleep, whereas a lower PODCI global function score was associated with a lower OR for sleep quality (OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98; p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Self-reported increases in screen time and intrafamilial violence report impacted sleep quality in both healthy adolescents and those with chronic conditions. Decreased health-related quality of life was observed in adolescents with poor sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Child , Chronic Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 159, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Exercise has been suggested to prevent deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and overall health in pediatric rheumatologic diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Herein we describe the effects of a 12-week, home-based, exercise program on overall health and quality of life among quarantined patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). METHOD: This prospective, quasi-experimental, mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) study was conducted between July and December 2020, during the most restricted period of COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. The home-based exercise program consisted of a 12-week, three-times-a-week, aerobic and strengthening (bodyweight) training program. Qualitative data were systematically evaluated. Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQOL) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) evaluate symptoms of mental health disorder, HRQL, and quality of sleep. FINDINGS: 11 patients (out of 27) met the inclusion criteria (91% female; mean ± SD age: 13.5 ± 3.2 years). Adherence to the intervention was 72.6%. Barriers to exercise involved poor internet connectivity, excessive weekly sessions, and other commitments. Even though not statistically significant, Self-report SDQ subscales Total Difficulties Score, Emotional Problems Score, and PedsQOL School Functioning Score improved after intervention (- 2.4; 95%confidence interval [CI] -5.1; 0.2, p = 0.06; - 1.0; 95%CI -2.2; 0.2, p = 0.09 and; 11.7; 95%CI -2.5; 25.8, p = 0.09, respectively). Remaining SDQ subscales were not altered. Six themes emerged from patients' and parents' comments (qualitative results). Patients engaged in exercise reported other health-related benefits including increased motivation, concentration and strength. INTERPRETATION: A home-based exercise program was associated with qualitative perceptions of improvements in overall health and HRQL by quarantined adolescents with JDM during COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons from this trial may help developing interventions focused on tackling physical inactivity in JDM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatomyositis/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
17.
Obes Surg ; 31(3): 1372-1375, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-848452

ABSTRACT

We assessed physical activity using accelerometers and a questionnaire in 33 post-bariatric patients who reported to be adherent (n = 15) or not (n = 18) to social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients adherent to social distancing spent more time in sedentary behavior (1.1 h/day, 0.1, 2.2; p = 0.045) and less time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (- 12.2 min/day, - 23.8, - 0.6; p = 0.040) vs. non-adherent ones. Bland-Altman analysis comparing objective and subjective physical activity estimates showed a bias for time spent in sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous activity of 2.8 h/day and 8.5 min/day. In conclusion, post-bariatric patients who were adherent to social distancing measures were more inactive and sedentary than non-adherent ones. Strategies to increase physical activity in post-bariatric patients exposed to social distancing are necessary during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Physical Distancing , Adult , Bariatrics , Female , Humans , Male , Medication Adherence , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sedentary Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires
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