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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066024

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus (SARS-CoV-2), has triggered an enormous scientific response. Many studies have focused on understanding the entry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus into the host cell. The angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is recognized as the host receptor used by SARS-CoV-2 to enter its target cells. Recent studies suggest that ACE2 gene polymorphisms might be candidates for genetic susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of ACE2 polymorphisms on COVID-19 disease risk and severity. In our study, we confirmed that there is a statistically significant increased risk of a more severe disease course of SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with the need for hospitalization in intensive care for patients with specific polymorphisms of the ACE2 gene. The most significant correlation was found for variant ACE2 rs2285666 (AA allele, OR = 2.12, p = 0.0189) and ACE2 rs2074192 (TT allele, OR = 2.05, p = 0.0016), and for ACE2 rs4646174 (GG allele, OR = 1.93, p = 0.0016), ACE2 rs4646156 (TT allele OR = 1.71, p = 0.008) and ACE2 rs2158083 (TT allele OR = 1.84, p = 0.0025). In conclusion, our findings identify that certain ACE2 polymorphisms impact the severity of COVID-19 disease independently of other well-known risk factors.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19 , Angiotensins/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
2.
Nutrients ; 14(14)2022 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938923

ABSTRACT

Limited social contacts, lack of professional activities, economic insecurity, and a sense of threat, as well as boredom during the COVID-19 pandemic, contributed to tension and stress. All of these increase the risk of an inappropriate diet. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mood and nutrition of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A group of 312 patients (both before and after bariatric surgery) completed a questionnaire about their diet and mood during COVID-19 lockdown. About 70% of all respondents reacted to the epidemiological situation: irritability, anxiety about their own health, and eating without being hungry. A total of 74% of all of the subjects snacked between meals (especially sweets). The respondents who believed that obesity and its complications had a negative impact on the prognosis of the coronavirus infection had a statistically significant higher prevalence of health anxiety, feeling that important life issues were out of control, irritability, need for psychological support, and need for dietary consultation. Patients after bariatric surgery had e.g., a statistically significant lower incidence of feeling hungry, eating after meals, and eating fatty foods. The COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to negatively affect the mood and diet of bariatric patients, which may affect their health status and worsen the prognosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Bariatric Surgery/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet , Humans , Pandemics
3.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329032

ABSTRACT

Background: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) first emerged in Hubei province of China in December 2019 and spread rapidly to other parts of the world, causing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is recognized as the host receptor used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus to enter its target cells. Recent studies suggest that ACE2 gene polymorphisms might be candidates for genetic susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of ACE2 polymorphisms on COVID-19 disease risk and severity. Results In our study we confirmed that there is a statistically significant increased risk of a more severe disease course of SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with the need for hospitalization in the intensive care unit for patients with specific polymorphisms of the ACE2 gene. The most significant correlation was found for variant ACE2 rs2285666 (AA allele, OR=2.12, p=0.0189) and ACE2 rs2074192 (TT allele, OR=2.05, p=0.0016), and also for ACE2 rs4646174 (GG allele, OR=1.93, p=0.0016), ACE2 rs4646156 (TT allele OR=1.71, p=0.008) and ACE2 rs2158083 (TT allele OR=1.84, p=0.0025). Conclusions In conclusion, our findings identify that certain ACE2 polymorphisms impact the severity of COVID-19 disease independently of other well-known risk factors.

4.
Clin Interv Aging ; 15: 1231-1240, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689982

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of 2020, the whole world has been struggling with the pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by a novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The SARS-CoV-2 infection depends on ACE2, TMPRSS2, and CD147, which are expressed on host cells. Several studies suggest that some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE2 might be a risk factor of COVID-19 infection. Genotypes affect ACE2 structure, its serum concentration, and levels of circulating angiotensin (1-7). Moreover, there is evidence that ACE genotype affects the outcomes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treatment, the most severe consequence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. COVID-19 morbidity, infection course, and mortality might depend on ACE D allele frequency. The aim of this narrative review was to analyze and identify the mechanisms of ACE-I and ARBs with particular emphasis on angiotensin receptors and their polymorphism in the light of COVID-19 pandemic as these medications are commonly prescribed to elderly patients. There is no direct evidence yet for ACE-I or ARBs in the treatment of COVID-19. However, for those already taking these medications, both the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology recommend continuing the treatment, because at present, there is no clear clinical or scientific evidence to justify the discontinuation of ACE-I or ARBs. Individualized treatment decisions should be based on the clinical condition and co-morbidities of each patient.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , Animals , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Eye Diseases, Hereditary , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Retinal Diseases , SARS-CoV-2
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