Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 28
Filter
1.
European journal of public health ; JOUR(Suppl 3), 32.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2101646

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted older people, not only in terms of clinical outcome but also in care provision. Investigating trends of changes in healthcare services access among older subjects during the pandemic, along with studying potential determinants, is of utmost interest to identify the most at-risk individuals. We used data from LOST in Lombardia, a cross-sectional study conducted on a representative sample of 4,400 older adults (aged 65 or more) in autumn 2020. Data were collected about lifestyles, mental health, and access to healthcare services before and during the pandemic. To investigate potential determinants of changes in healthcare access, we presented prevalence ratios (PRs) estimated through multivariable log-binomial regression models. Twenty-one per cent of the participants increased telephone contacts with general practitioner (GP), 9.6% specialist visits for a fee, while 22.4% decreased GP visits, 7.5% ED access, 6% hospitalisations, 12.3% outpatient visits, 9.1% diagnostic exams. The prevalence of the cancellation or delay of medical appointments by the patient's decision was 23.8%, with higher proportions among men, among individuals aged 75 or over as compared to those aged 65-74, and among individuals with a higher self-reported economic status (p-value<0.05). People with comorbidities more frequently cancelled or postponed visits, reduced ED access or hospitalisations. Moreover, individuals with worsened mental health status showed a higher prevalence to cancel or delay visits and to reduce ED access. The decrease in healthcare provision and consultations could result in mortality and morbidity excess. Our results should inform targeted intervention to bridge the gaps and overcome the health inequalities that the pandemic has deepened. Exploring the underlying reasons and determinants for healthcare avoiding or delaying among the most vulnerable groups is crucial for epidemic preparedness and planning future interventions.

2.
European journal of public health ; JOUR(Suppl 3), 32.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2101545

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic led to an ‘infodemic', as defined by the WHO, which made it difficult to be accurately informed on public health topics. For this purpose, many people use social media as a source of information, mainly YouTube. Given the great resonance of this platform, our study aims at assessing quality and reliability of its content regarding the COVID-19 vaccination. Methods During March 2022, six searches were performed on the Italian YouTube platform using the following terms: “Covid vaccination”, “Covid vaccine”, “Coronavirus vaccination”, “Coronavirus vaccine”, “Sars-Cov-2 vaccination” and “Sars-Cov-2 vaccine”. A total of 329 videos were analysed, after removing 271 duplicated videos, and classified in seven types of channel. The reliability of the content was evaluated through the HoNCode score, while quality was tested using the validated DISCERN tool. Results The most frequent category was ‘Internet Media’ (33%), while the less frequent one was ‘Educational Medical’ (7%). The content reliability (i.e. HoNCode score) resulted higher for videos produced by medical healthcare workers than non-medical ones. Concerning the quality, the DISCERN score resulted significantly higher for the Educational channels (median 46.0 for medical and 41.3 non-medical ones) as compared to Internet Media (26.5) and New Agencies (24.3). Conclusions Although YouTube has implemented a policy against misinformation related to the COVID-19 vaccination, the study highlights that there is extreme heterogeneity in reliability and quality of videos. Content produced by non-medical users, especially “Internet Media” and “News Agencies” categories should be evaluated with attention by users, as their quality is not appropriate to the importance of the topic. Key messages • Because of to the heterogeneity of its content, YouTube should be evaluated carefully when used as a source of information for Covid-19 vaccination. • Content produced by non-medical users, is generally of poor quality, not appropriate to the importance of the topic.

3.
Cancer Research ; 82(4 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1779467

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the beginning of the covid19 pandemic, clinical and demographic data showed that cancer patients are at high risk of developing severe consequences of Sars-Cov2 disease. For this reason, vaccination is strongly recommended, especially for patients on active treatment. Nevertheless, the efficacy of the Sars-Cov2 vaccine in cancer patients is not fully investigated. Our trial aim to explore the seroconversion in a large series of vaccinated cancer patients undergoing active treatment. Here we present a subgroup analysis concerning patients affected by breast cancer. Methods: The "VAX-on" is a single-center study that enrolled 366 cancer patients who underwent oncological treatment within the last six months. The study was approved by the ethics committee and all patients had to sign specific informed consent to be enrolled. Subjects were vaccinated against Sars-Cov2 with mRNA vaccine BNT162b2 (Comirnaty)-Pfizer BioNTech. Blood samples were obtained to quantify the production of specific anti-Spike IgG antibodies at day 21 from the first dose and at 6-8 weeks after the second dose. The antibody laboratory title cut-off of 50 U.A./mL defined the seroconversion. Results are shown as Mean and Standard Deviation for Scontinuous variable, percentage (%) for categorical ones. The Mann-Whitney test or Chi-Square test were used to compare continuous or categorical groups, respectively. Results: A total of 100 patients with breast cancer were enrolled. Clinical and demographic data are summarized in Table 1. The median age was 60.5 years and the majority had an ECOG PS of 0 (75%). Almost all were women (97%), with advanced cancer in 60% of cases. In early or advanced setting 46% patients were treated with chemotherapy while 54% were on target therapy (also including monoclonal antibody and CDK4/6 inhibitors). The mean antibody title after the first dose of mRNA Comirnaty vaccine was 2185.03±9303.26 U.A./mL (M±SD), while after the second dose the mean antibody title rise to 6492.10±10425.95 (M±SD). After the first dose 61% of patients were considered as immunized, meanwhile after the second dose 86% of patients resulted immunized (defined as an antibody title >50 U.A./mL). In the 9 patients in treatment with steroids (prednisone > 10mg/die or equivalent), there was a trend to a decreased antibody development compared to patients without chronic use of steroids (p 0.06 and 0.05 after the first and second dose, respectively). Of interest, patients using G-CSF (12%) had a significant reduction in the production of Sars-Cov2 antibody after vaccination compared to patients who did not use them (p 0.02 and <0.001 after the first and second dose, respectively), with only 75% resulted positively immunized after the second dose (p=0.04). No differences were seen when comparing patients in advanced with non-advanced stage. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated 86% seroconversion in cancer patients after the second dose of mRNA vaccine regardless of disease stage or type of cancer treatment received. Further evaluations are needed to define whether the use of corticosteroids and G-CSF have an impact on seroconversion.

6.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31:51-51, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1610461
8.
ESMO Open ; 7(1): 100350, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Preliminary analysis from the Vax-On study did not find a correlation between cancer treatment type and antibody response to COVID-19 vaccination. We carried out a secondary subgroup analysis to verify the effects of comprehensive cancer treatment classification on vaccine immunogenicity. METHODS: The Vax-On study prospectively enrolled patients who started a two-dose messenger RNA-BNT162b2 vaccine schedule from 9 March 2021 to 12 April 2021 (timepoint-1). Those on active treatment within the previous 28 days accounted for the exposed cases. Patients who had discontinued such treatment by at least 28 days or received intravesical therapy represented the control cases. Quantification of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the receptor binding domain of the S1 subunit of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein was carried out before the second dose (timepoint-2) and 8 weeks thereafter (timepoint-3). Seroconversion response was defined at ≥50 arbitrary units/ml IgG titer. Classification of antineoplastic agents was based on their pharmacodynamic properties. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty-six patients were enrolled (86 and 260 as control and exposed cases, respectively). Univariate analysis revealed a significantly lower IgG titer after both doses of vaccine in subgroups treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), multiple cytotoxic agents, alkylating agents, and topoisomerase inhibitors. At timepoint-3, seroconversion response was significantly impaired in the topoisomerase inhibitors and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors subgroups. After multivariate testing, treatment with alkylating agents and TKIs was significantly associated with a reduced change in IgG titer at timepoint-2. Treatment with mTOR inhibitors resulted in a similar interaction at each timepoint. Cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor treatment was independently correlated with an incremental variation in IgG titer at timepoint-3. Specific subgroups (TKIs, antimetabolites, alkylating agents, and multiple-agent chemotherapy) predicted lack of seroconversion at timepoint-2, but their effect was not retained at timepoint-3. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2, immunosuppressive corticosteroid dosing, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use were independently linked to lower IgG titer after either dose of vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Drugs interfering with DNA synthesis, multiple-agent cytotoxic chemotherapy, TKIs, mTOR and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors differentially modulate humoral response to messenger RNA-BNT162b2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , COVID-19 , Immunity, Humoral , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Neoplasms , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/immunology , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
9.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1514779

ABSTRACT

Background As stressed by COVID-19 pandemic, urbanicity might represent a risk factor for chronic non-communicable diseases or generally impacting on healthy lifestyle, among them physical activity. Methods In light of this, we performed a systematic review aimed to explore the association between urban greenspaces and two important health indicators for both mental and physical health. In particular, our aims were to analyze the association between publicly accessible urban greenspaces exposure, and mental health outcomes (MH) and objectively-measured physical activity (PA). The review was conducted from 2000/01/01 to 2020/09/30 searching in two electronic databases: PubMed/Medline and Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE). Only articles in English were included. Results Out of 356, a total of 34 studies were included in our review, of which 19 assessed MH outcomes, the remaining dealt with PA. Only a few included studies found a non-effect or a negative effect on MH outcomes, whereas, all the others demonstrated a positive effect of urban greenspace and both MH and PA. However, our results stressed not only the importance of green space presence, but also the importance of maintenance, renovation, closeness to residential areas, the presence of interactive activities, and perceived security aspects. Conclusions To conclude, even some methodological limitations of the included studies, results are concordant in demonstrating that urban greenspaces show potentially beneficial effects on mental health and physical activity. Our results are significant for public health experts and policymakers involved in urban planning, community health promotion, and improvement of health and social equity. Key messages Urban green spaces are important factors, impacting on both physical and mental health. Policymakers involved in urban planning should pay more attention in urban green spaces.

10.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1514667

ABSTRACT

Background Healthcare workers (HCW) adherence to hand hygiene (HH) is the most effective infection prevention and control (IPC) measure to fight healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and is a crucial component for standard precautions, especially in a pandemic context. As suggested by the WHO and Joint Commission Network Project, evaluating adherence to HH is essential to identify deficiencies and promote improvement interventions. Methods San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, adopted internal audits to measure HCWs' adherence to HH according to WHO Guidelines. Public health (PH) residents were enrolled as auditors. They were trained with WHO technical manual for observers and handovers among residents. WHO observation form was used for collection. Process index was HH adherence, stratified by profession, unit, opportunity and indication. Results 8 PH medical residents carried out observations from January 2018 to December 2019. 434 HCWs were observed in 26 hospital units (191 nurses, 148 physicians, 83 healthcare assistants and 11 other professionals). Global adherence was 53%, calculated on 1,969 opportunities, and 2,221 indications observed, followed by 932 hands rubbing and 110 handwashing. Most observations involved nurses (adherence of 53%) and physicians (54%). Global adherence was generally higher in medicine, specialist surgery and intensive-care units while lower in general surgery and rehabilitation units. Indications with the highest adherence were “after body fluid exposure risk” (69%) and “after touching a patient” (64%). The lowest adherence (44%) was observed for “before clean/aseptic procedure” indication. The belief that gloves use may replace HH might partially explain the data. Conclusions Global HH adherence was in line with significant published data and was far better than 2016 data but slightly lower than observations in 2018 when the program started. We believe 2020 HH compliance could have changed due to HCW involvement in IPC against COVID-19. Key messages Hand hygiene (HH) audits represent a crucial tool of clinical governance and risk management: auditors’ training, monthly and annual reports, and feedbacks allowed to structure a virtuous process. If HH audits aim to improve practice we should understand when HH is most beneficial, assessing quality, improving performances through achievable targets using reproducible methods and technologies.

11.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1514568

ABSTRACT

Background The Lombardy region has been one of the Italian regions most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, with 22.7% of total Italian cases and 33.9% of total deaths. The emergency healthcare system was under deep stress throughout the period under consideration due to the admission of COVID-19 patients to the Emergency Department (ED) and had to be thoroughly reorganized. Methods We performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of patients admitted into the ED recorded in the Lombardy online regional portal called EUOL. We compared the data registered in the EUOL with the patients admitted to the EDs from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019 and from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2020. Results The number of admissions to the ED decreased by 32.5% in 2020 compared to 2019, reaching the lowest number in March and April. However, the percentage of patients hospitalised after ED significantly increased in 2020 compared to 2019 (OR 1.47, p < 0.0001), reflecting the management of patients with a more severe clinical condition. Indeed, the number of patients classified as red or yellow codes at hospital admission was significantly higher in 2020 than in 2019 (p < 0.0001). Moreover, more patients arrived at the ED by ambulance in 2020 (21.7% in 2020 versus 15.1% in 2019. OR 1.56, p < 0.0001), with more than 35% of patients transported by ambulance in March and April 2020. Conclusions Our results showed, on the one hand, inappropriate visits to the EDs by non-emergency and low complex cases in 2019 before the pandemic and, on the other hand, they also highlighted that patients in critical condition were reluctant to visit the ED due to the fear of getting infected. This analysis showed that EMS played a crucial role in the overall public health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing the percentage of patients transported to the hospital with a severe clinical condition, reorganizing and allocating resources to the areas that were most affected during the pandemic. Key messages This is a descriptive analysis of the public health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the admission to Emergency Departments in 2020. Our results underline the need to monitor the pandemic’s evolution in order to reorganize the hospitals that admitted the COVID-19 patients.

12.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1514563

ABSTRACT

Introduction After-Action Reviews (AARs) are healthcare management tools applied to evaluate responses to public health emergencies, identifying best practices and challenges. They are included in the International Health Regulations (IHR) and recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The aim of this study was to adapt the WHO AAR guidelines to assess the response during the COVID-19 first epidemic wave (February 22nd-May 3rd, 2020) at San Raffaele Scientific Institute, a large university hospital in Milan, Italy. The hospital treated 951 patients and underwent massive re-organization. Methods We developed a hospital-oriented AAR based on the key-informant interview format. After establishing an AAR planning and analysis team, an ad-hoc questionnaire was designed to explore four areas: i)Staff management;ii)Logistics and supplies;iii)Diagnosis and clinical management;iv)Communication. The questionnaire was used to support 36 semi-structured interviews of professionals with executive, clinical, technical and administrative roles within the hospital. Results The hospital response was rated as overall effective and sufficiently prompt. Participants stressed the key roles played by: i)strong governance and coordination;ii)readiness and availability of healthcare personnel;iii)multidisciplinary model of care based on levels of intensity. Major challenges concerned communication strategies and staff training. In addition, participants highlighted the need for greater collaboration among hospitals and primary care services. Conclusions This study represents one of the first applications of an AAR to the COVID-19 emergency and to the hospital setting. The tool provided San Raffaele's hospital management with a multi-layered analysis of the emergency response that informed the critical planning for next phases of the pandemic response. The tool can be adapted to other settings to pursue continuous operational improvement. Key messages After-action reviews are healthcare managements tools used to to evaluate a country or government’s response to infectious disease outbreaks, environmental or natural disasters and societal crises. After Action Reviews can be adapted or scaled for other settings to pursue continuous operational improvement and support preparedness strategies for future public health emergencies.

14.
J Hosp Infect ; 114: 63-78, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317467

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 has underlined the importance of adopting effective infection prevention and control (IPC) measures in hospital and community settings. Ultraviolet (UV)-based technologies represent promising IPC tools: their effective application for sanitation has been extensively evaluated in the past but scant, heterogeneous and inconclusive evidence is available on their effect on SARS-CoV-2 transmission. With the aim of pooling the available evidence on the efficacy of UV technologies against coronaviruses, we conducted a systematic review following PRISMA guidelines, searching Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library, and the main clinical trials' registries (WHO ICTRP, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane and EU Clinical Trial Register). Quantitative data on studies' interventions were summarized in tables, pooled by different coronavirus species and strain, UV source, characteristics of UV light exposure and outcomes. Eighteen papers met our inclusion criteria, published between 1972 and 2020. Six focused on SARS-CoV-2, four on SARS-CoV-1, one on MERS-CoV, three on seasonal coronaviruses, and four on animal coronaviruses. All were experimental studies. Overall, despite wide heterogenicity within included studies, complete inactivation of coronaviruses on surfaces or aerosolized, including SARS-CoV-2, was reported to take a maximum exposure time of 15 min and to need a maximum distance from the UV emitter of up to 1 m. Advances in UV-based technologies in the field of sanitation and their proved high virucidal potential against SARS-CoV-2 support their use for IPC in hospital and community settings and their contribution towards ending the COVID-19 pandemic. National and international guidelines are to be updated and parameters and conditions of use need to be identified to ensure both efficacy and safety of UV technology application for effective infection prevention and control in both healthcare and non-healthcare settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus/radiation effects , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Technology
15.
Ann Ig ; 33(5): 513-517, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317344

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Starting from the minimum requirements indicated by Lombardy Region, a validation checklist has been developed by experts in design, healthcare layout planning, hygiene and public health, planning and compliance, in order to provide managers of COVID-19 massive vaccination centers with a useful and easy-to-use tool to ensure quality, safety and efficiency of the different activities performed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Health Centers/organization & administration , Mass Vaccination/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Validation Studies as Topic , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Checklist , Community Health Centers/standards , Efficiency, Organizational , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Hygiene , Italy , Patient Safety , Quality Assurance, Health Care , Quality Indicators, Health Care
16.
Ann Ig ; 33(5): 499-512, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317343

ABSTRACT

Abstract: After SARS-CoV-2 vaccines development came at an unprecedented speed, ensuring safe and efficient mass immunization, vaccine delivery be-came the major public health mandate. Although mass-vaccination sites have been identified as essential to curb COVID-19, their organization and functioning is challenging. In this paper we present the planning, implementation and evalua-tion of a massive vaccination center in Lombardy - the largest Region in Italy and the most heavily hit by the pandemic. The massive hub of Novegro (Milan), managed by the Gruppo Ospedaliero San Donato, opened in April 2021. The Novegro mass-immunization model was developed building a la-yout based on the available scientific evidence, on comparative analysis with other existing models and on the experience of COVID-19 immunization delivery of Gruppo Ospedaliero San Donato. We propose a "vaccine islands" mass-immunization model, where 4 physicians and 2 nurses operate in each island, with up to 10 islands functioning at the same time, with the capacity of providing up to 6,000 vaccinations per day. During the first week of activity a total of 37,900 doses were administered (2,700/day), most of them with Pfizer vaccine (85.8%) and first doses (70.9%). The productivity was 10.5 vaccines/hour/vaccine station. Quality, efficiency and safety were boosted by ad-hoc personnel training, quality technical infrastructure and the presence of a shock room. Constant process monitoring allowed to identify and promptly tackle process pitfalls, including vaccine refusals (0.36%, below expectations) and post-vaccinations adverse reactions (0.4%). Our innovative "vaccine islands" mass-immunization model might be scaled-up or adapted to other settings. The Authors consider that sharing best practices in immunization delivery is fundamen-tal to achieve population health during health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Health Centers/organization & administration , Mass Vaccination/organization & administration , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Community Health Centers/statistics & numerical data , Efficiency, Organizational , Facilities and Services Utilization , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Vaccination/methods , Mass Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement
17.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 44(1): e149-e152, 2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Lombardy region has been the Italian region most affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in 2020. The emergency healthcare system was under deep stress throughout the past year due to the admission of COVID-19 patients to the emergency department (ED) and had to be thoroughly reorganized. METHODS: We performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of patients admitted into the ED recorded in the Lombardy online regional portal called EUOL (Emergenza e Urgenza OnLine). We compared the data registered in the EUOL with the patients admitted to the EDs from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019 and from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2020. RESULTS: The number of admissions to the ED decreased by 32.5% in 2020 compared with 2019, reaching the lowest number in March and April. However, the percentage of patients hospitalized after ED significantly increased in 2020 compared with 2019 (P < 0.0001), reflecting the management of patients with a more severe clinical condition. More patients arrived at the ED by ambulance in 2020 (21.7% in 2020 versus 15.1% in 2019; P < 0.0001), particularly during March and April. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis showed the importance of monitoring the pandemic's evolution in order to treat more critically ill patients, despite a lower number of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Public Health , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Medicina dello Sport ; 74(1):1-21, 2021.
Article in English, Italian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1248527

ABSTRACT

Given the most recent epidemiological data and in view of the increasing spread of the Sars-CoV-2 virus in society as a whole and the world of sport in particular, the following medical and health recommendations are proposed to implement the FIGC regulations, approved by the CTS and already in place for professional soccer and the LEGA Serie A, in order to: 1) protect the health of individual players and the team group and reduce the risk of contracting the Sars-CoV-2 virus for all members and employees of Serie A Clubs by means of periodic and preventive monitoring;2) reduce the spread of the virus from within the group to the general public, by taking social responsibility;and 3) standardize management of the testing, transport, analysis and reporting process of the system. In order to pursue these objectives and optimize the recommendations set out below, it is necessary: 1) to identify a single company/ central laboratory to contact in order to guarantee a consistent method in the management of the testing, transport, analysis and reporting processes of molecular swabs (PCR). All Serie A clubs shall refer to this company/central laboratory, recognizing its exclusive status for the execution of such processes;2) to identify a contact authority available 24h (with dedicated email and telephone) within Serie A for the coordination and management of every need and/or emergency;3) for the Ministry of Health to activate a contact figure to coordinate and oversee each local ATS/ASL so as to guarantee that clubs receive uniform indications and provisions and to act as interface for the entire professional system. This central figure will delegate the management of everyday business to the various local ATS/ASLs, receiving constant, up-to-date feedback;and 4) to urge the Ministry of Health to adopt uniform procedures within the National Health System (local ATS/ASLs) in matters of management of players who test positive a second time after announcing their recovery and management of players who, in contact quarantine, are called up to the national team or who return from it. The FMSI may also make its DCOs available, as an opportunity to be agreed with the FIGC and the AIA, to perform rapid antigen tests on the refereeing group 2 hours before a game. The following recommendations are subject to review considering new scientific and epidemiological evidence. Copyright © 2020 Edizioni Minerva Medica.

19.
International Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health [Electronic Resource] ; 18(8):20, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208731

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a novel infectious disease which has rapidly spread around the globe, disrupting several aspects of public life over the past year. After numerous infection clusters emerged among travelers hosted in ski resorts in early 2020, several European countries closed ski areas. These measures were mostly upheld throughout the 2020 and 2021 winter season, generating significant economic loss for mountain communities. The aim of this rapid systematic review was to explore the association between recreational skiing and the spread of COVID-19. This review was conducted according to the WHO practical guidelines on rapid reviews and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. PubMed, Scopus, MedRxiv and Promed-mail were screened to identify relevant scientific and grey literature published since the emergence of COVID-19. Among the 11 articles included, seven focused on cases recorded during the first epidemic wave, when COVID-19 containment measures were not yet mandatory. Most infection clusters could be directly linked to public gatherings which took place without the enforcement of restrictions. There is currently no evidence to suggest an association between COVID-19 spread and recreational skiing. It may be reasonable to consider the reopening of ski areas in compliance with strict rules and preventive measures.

20.
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL