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1.
J Immunol Methods ; 502: 113230, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720358

ABSTRACT

Innate immune mechanisms are central players in response to the binding of pathogens to pattern-recognition receptors providing a crucial initial block on viral replication. Moreover, innate immune response mobilizes cells of the cellular-mediated immune system, which develop into effector cells that promote viral clearance. Here, we observed circulating leukocyte T cell response in healthy subjects, COVID-19 infected, and in healthy vaccinated subjects. We found a significant CD8+ T cells (p < 0,05) decrease and an augmented CD4+/CD8+ ratio (p < 0,05) in COVID-19 infected group compared with vaccinated subjects. In addition, healthy vaccinated subjects have a significant increased expression of CD8+ T cells, and a reduction of CD4+/CD8+ ratio with respect to subjects previously COVID-19 infected. Central Memory and Terminal Effector Memory cells (TEMRA) increased after vaccine but not among groups.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , /immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-CD8 Ratio , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunophenotyping , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination
2.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 10(11)2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523844

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effect of the pandemic on the disruption of a persuasive educational antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) conducted in a university hospital in southern Italy. METHODS: In March 2020, the ASP, which began in January 2017 and was carried out at different times in 10 wards, was stopped due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted an observational study with interrupted time series analysis to compare the antibiotic consumption and costs, average length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality between 12 months before and 9 months after the interruption. RESULTS: Four medical, four surgical wards and two ICUs were included in the study, for a total of 35,921 patient days. Among the medical wards we observed after the interruption a significant increase in fluoroquinolone use, with a change in trend (CT) of 0.996, p = 0.027. In the surgical wards, we observed a significant increase in the overall consumption, with a change in level (CL) of 24.4, p = 0.005, and in the use of third and fourth generation cephalosporins (CL 4.7, p = 0.003). In two ICUs, we observed a significant increase in piperacillin/tazobactam and fluoroquinolone consumption (CT 9.28, p = 0.019, and 2.4, p = 0.047). In the wards with a duration of ASP less than 30 months, we observed a significant increase in antibiotic consumption in the use of piperacillin/tazobactam and fluoroquinolones (CT 12.9, p = 0.022: 4.12, p = 0.029; 1.004, p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: The interruption of ASP during COVID-19 led to an increase in the consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly in surgical wards and in those with a duration of ASP less than 30 months.

3.
Front Oncol ; 11: 662746, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity presentation between oncologic and non-oncologic patients and to evaluate the impact of cancer type and stage on COVID-19 course. METHODS: We performed a multicentre, retrospective study involving 13 COVID-19 Units in Campania region from February to May 2020. We defined as severe COVID-19 presentation the cases that required mechanical ventilation and/or admission to Intensive Care Units (ICU) and/or in case of death. RESULTS: We enrolled 371 COVID-19 patients, of whom 34 (9.2%) had a history or a diagnosis of cancer (24 solid, 6 onco-hematological). Oncologic patients were older (p<0.001), had more comorbidities (p<0.001) and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 presentation (p=0.001) and of death (p<0.001). Compared to 12 patients with non-active cancer and to 337 without cancer, the 17 patients with active cancer had more comorbidities and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 and of mortality (all p values <0.001). Compared to the 281 non-severe patients, the 90 subjects with a severe presentation of COVID-19 were older (p<0.01), with more comorbidities (p<0.001) and with a higher rate of cancer (p=0.001). At multivariate analysis, age (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.11) and suffering from cancer in an active stage (OR 5.33, 95% CI: 1.77-16.53) were independently associated with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Since the higher risk of severe evolution of COVID-19, cancer patients, especially those with an active malignancy, should be candidates for early evaluation of symptoms and early treatment for COVID-19.

4.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 175: 108797, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179400

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate the rate of antibiotic resistance and its main risk factors in a population of patients with diabetic foot infection (DFI) during the COVID-19 pandemic, in comparison with the population of 2019. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-five patients with DFI were admitted in a tertiary care center from January 2019 to December 2020. Antibiotic resistance was evaluated by microbiological examination of soft tissues' or bone's biopsy. RESULTS: Compared with 2019 group (n = 105), 2020 group (n = 120) had a significantly higher prevalence of antibiotic resistance [2019 vs 2020, 36% vs 63%, P <0.001] and more often was admitted with recent or current antibiotic therapy (18% vs 52%, P <0.001), which was frequently self-administered (5% vs 30%, P = 0.032). The risk of antibiotic resistance was also higher in 2020 group [OR 95% CI, 2.90 (1.68 to 4.99)]. Prior hospitalization, antibiotic self-administration and antibiotic prescription by general practitioners resulted as independent predictors of antibiotic resistance. CONCLUSIONS: In a population of people with DFI admitted in a tertiary care center during the COVID-19 pandemic the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was higher than 2019. Previous hospitalization, antibiotic self-administration /prescription by general practitioners were related to higher risk of antibiotic resistant infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Diabetic Foot/drug therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tertiary Care Centers
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