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INDIAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE ; 26(7):833-835, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939280

ABSTRACT

Background: The major brunt of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-2019) is borne by the lungs. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients is a compromise of the respiratory system. Pneumothorax is noted as an insignificant proportion of patients suffering from COVID-19, but it jeopardizes the clinical recovery significantly. We, in the case series of 10 patients, will be summarizing the epidemiological, demographic, and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients who also developed pneumothorax. Patients and methods: All the confirmed cases of COVID-19 pneumonia diagnosed between May 1, 2020 and August 30, 2020, admitted at our center meeting the inclusion criteria and whose clinical course was complicated by pneumothorax were made part of our study. Their clinical records were studied, and epidemiological, demographic, and clinical data of these patients were collected and compiled in this case series. Results: All the patients in our study required ICU care, and 60% received non-invasive mechanical ventilation, while 40% of the patients progressed to intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. A total of 70% of the patients in our study had a successful outcome, while 30% succumbed to the disease and expired. Conclusion: Epidemiological, demographic, and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients complicated with pneumothorax were evaluated. Our study showed that pneumothorax also developed in some patients who had not received mechanical ventilation, indicating that pneumothorax could be a secondary complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our study also emphasizes the fact that even the majority of patients whose clinical course was complicated by pneumothorax had a successful outcome emphasizing the need for timely and adequate intervention in such cases.

2.
Springer Protocol. Handb. ; : 363-377, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1858946

ABSTRACT

Infectious disease outbreaks keep challenging human and veterinary health worldwide since decades. Disease outbreaks such as smallpox, influenza, polio, SARS, Ebola, foot-and-mouth disease, African swine fever, and the most recent and devastating COVID-19, all point to the need for a more proactive approach to developing diagnostics and treatment methods for these deadly diseases. Because the pathogenic agents that cause these diseases are highly transmissible, careful containment of these agents within the laboratories is necessary, with little or no exposure to working personnel. Different regulatory authorities across the world provide guidelines and procedures to ensure that research and diagnostic laboratories operate safely. This chapter delves into the many events that occur as a result of lab-mediated disease spread, as well as the need for, importance of, and guidelines for good lab practices and biosafety.

3.
Lung India ; 39(SUPPL 1):S244-S245, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1857745

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aims to evaluate different clinical and blood biochemical characteristics of 100 post-COVID patients admitted in Department of Pulmonary Medicine MLN Medical College Prayagraj. Methods: In this single centre post-COVID observatory study, 100 patients were included and divided to mild, moderate and severe/critical groups. Their clinical sign and symptoms and blood biochemical markers were analyzed. Results: Our findings suggested that post-COVID patients had varying degree of breathlessness requiring specific oxygen therapy. Other clinical features include marked muscle weakness, lethargy, sleeplessness and forgetfulness. Majority of them had uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension in terms of co-morbidities. In blood biochemical characteristics we observed that majority of patients had raised levels of D-Dimer, S.ferritin, S.LDH, S.procalcitonin, ESR and CRP. Maximum of them had raised PT-INR, TLC, SGOT, SGPT, RBS, urea and creatinine level. Some of them also had electrolytes disturbances in terms of deranged sodium and potassium levels. Conclusion: POST- COVID patients had different clinical and blood biochemical characteristics which indicates multiple organ dysfunction. Severe patient's group had age > 50 years, co-morbidities in terms of uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension, markedly increased D-Dimer, S.LDH, S.ferritin, ESR, CRP, PTINR levels and deranged liver and kidney function of varying degrees. These blood biochemical indicators could reflect the severity of disease to a certain extent and should be considered in clinical management of the disease. Some of the parameters like D-Dimer, S.LDH, S.Procalcitonin, lymphopenia may also be a prognostic indicator.

4.
Embase; 2022.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-333965

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims There is limited data available on longitudinal humoral antibody dynamics following two doses of ChAdOx1-nCOV (Covishield™) and BBV-152 (Covaxin™) vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 among Indians. Methods We conducted a 6-month longitudinal study in vaccinated healthcare workers by serially measuring quantitative anti-spike antibody at 3-weeks, 3-months and 6-months after the completion of second dose. Geometric mean titer (GMT) and linear mixed models were used to assess the dynamics of antibody levels at 6 months. Results Of the 481 participants, GMT of anti-spike antibody decreased by 56% at 6-months regardless of demographics and comorbidities in 360 SARS-CoV-2 naive individuals, significantly in hypertensives. Participants with past infection had significantly higher GMT at all time points compared to naive individuals. Among SARS-CoV-2 naive cohorts, a significantly higher GMT was noted amongst the Covishield recipients at all time points, but there was a 44% decline in GMT at 6-month compared to peak titer period. Decline in GMT was insignificant (8%) in Covaxin recipients at 6-month despite a lower GMT at all time points vs. Covishield. There was 5.6-fold decrease in seropositivity rate at 6-month with both vaccines. Participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a lower seropositivity rate at all the time points. While seropositivity rate was significantly higher with Covishield vs. Covaxin at all time points except at 6-month where Covaxin recipients had a higher seropositivity, although no difference in seropositivity was noted in propensity-matched analysis. Conclusions There is waning humoral antibody response following two doses of either vaccine at six months.

5.
Pantnagar Journal of Research ; 19(2):311-317, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1519430

ABSTRACT

World Health Organization (WHO) China Country Office told instances of pneumonia of unknown etiology found in Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China, thereafter,on seventh January 2020, Chinese specialists recognized another novel strain of Coronavirus as the causative agent of the sickness. The infection agent has been renamed by WHO as SARS-CoV- 2 and the disease brought about by it as COVID-19. The virus first identified in China has now spread to more than 210 nations/domains, with reports of nearby transmission occurring in more than 160 of these nations/regions. According to WHO there has been an aggregate of millions of confirmed cases and a great many passings because of COVID-19 around the world. This study was conducted to determine the determinants of cases, recovered and death of the covid-19 with some demographic and economical factors in Indian states. The correlation analysis showed that total population, male, female, population above 60, no. of literate, person below poverty and private hospital has significant positive correlation with covid-19 cases, recovery and death whereas population density, public hospital, per capita income, shikhs, Christians, vegetarian- nonvegetarian, tobacco smoker, toddy - country liquor, beer, imported alcohol-wine did not show significance.

6.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 69(8):11-12, 2021.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1396309
7.
Medico-Legal Update ; 20(4):96-99, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1006674

ABSTRACT

Health care professionals are highly vulnerable for COVID 19 infection. It is due to frequents contact with COVID 19 positive patients, long time exposure with positive patients. There may be lack of personnel protective equipment’s (PPE).Indian health care professional taking many kinds of pain during the management of COVID 19 it can be hospital related problems during management, professional must wear PPE about 06 hours on duty time. Duty time with PPE personnel uncomforted and cannot have anything even water. PPE cannot change frequently. Sociallypersons do not comfort because society not accepting as normal people,they afraid of spreading of corona by health care personnel. Family isolation also necessary for the health care professional to avoid infection to their family members during COVID 19 management. Healthprofessionals have tough time to managepandemic. Government also active and full swing supporting providing extra care of health professionals. giving insurance and approved extra budget to fight with COVID 19.

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