Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society ; 70(5):1349-1351, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2010976

ABSTRACT

Compared two different COVID-19 vaccination strategies for older adults across two Canadian provinces from January-July, 2021 in people 60 years and older, one providing more on-time second doses and the other providing significantly delayed second doses for community-dwelling older persons during active periods of community transmission. The Canadian provinces of Ontario ("late") and Alberta ("early") were ideal for comparison, because of their similarly high rates of COVID-19 activity in late winter and early spring 2021. Vaccination coverage data were obtained from the Public Health Agency of Canada, COVID-19 mortality data were obtained from provincial public health websites, and age-specific mortality rates were calculated by dividing confirmed COVID-19 deaths by the mid-year population estimate from the national census. The results show both provinces achieved similar first-dose vaccination coverage among adults aged 60 and older by mid-April, 2021. However, second-dose coverage was approximately three times higher among people 80 years and over and four-to-eight times higher among people aged 60-79 in Alberta ("early") by mid-April compared to Ontario ("late"). Overall, COVID-19 mortality rates were approximately twice as high in Ontario ("late") than in Alberta ("early") between mid-April and June 2021, but after Ontario began offering second doses to community dwelling adults 80 years and older on May 31, 2021, complete vaccination rates equalized and the discrepancy in mortality declined. The findings may extend to the rollout of booster vaccines for older people in response to waning immunity and novel COVID-19 variants, though further study is needed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
JMIR Aging ; 5(3): e34952, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933478

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Geriatric care professionals were forced to rapidly adopt the use of telemedicine technologies to ensure the continuity of care for their older patients in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there is little current literature that describes how telemedicine technologies can best be used to meet the needs of geriatric care professionals in providing care to frail older patients, their caregivers, and their families. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to identify the benefits and challenges geriatric care professionals face when using telemedicine technologies with frail older patients, their caregivers, and their families and how to maximize the benefits of this method of providing care. METHODS: This was a mixed methods study that recruited geriatric care professionals to complete an online survey regarding their personal demographics and experiences with using telemedicine technologies and participate in a semistructured interview. Interview responses were analyzed using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). RESULTS: Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained from 30 practicing geriatric care professionals (22, 73%, geriatricians, 5, 17%, geriatric psychiatrists, and 3, 10%, geriatric nurse practitioners) recruited from across the Greater Toronto Area. Analysis of interview data identified 5 CFIR contextual barriers (complexity, design quality and packaging, patient needs and resources, readiness for implementation, and culture) and 13 CFIR contextual facilitators (relative advantage, adaptability, tension for change, available resources, access to knowledge, networks and communications, compatibility, knowledge and beliefs, self-efficacy, champions, external agents, executing, and reflecting and evaluating). The CFIR concept of external policy and incentives was found to be a neutral construct. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first known study to use the CFIR to develop a comprehensive narrative to characterize the experiences of Ontario geriatric care professionals using telemedicine technologies in providing care. Overall, telemedicine can significantly enable most of the geriatric care that is traditionally provided in person but is less useful in providing specific aspects of geriatric care to frail older patients, their caregivers, and their families.

3.
Medical Decision Making ; 41(2):233-239, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1717507

ABSTRACT

To meet urgent decisional needs of retirement/nursing home residents and their families, our interdisciplinary stakeholder team rapidly developed and disseminated patient decision aids (PtDAs) regarding leaving one's residence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The development steps were as follows: identify urgent decisional needs, develop PtDAs using the Ottawa Decision Support Framework template and minimal International PtDA Standards, obtain stakeholder feedback, broadly disseminate, and incorporate user feedback. Within 2 wk, we developed 2 PtDAs for retirement and nursing home living environments that were informed by decisional needs (identified from public responses to related media reports), current pandemic regulations/guidance, and recent systematic reviews. Within 3 wk of their dissemination (websites, international PtDA inventory, Twitter, Facebook, media interviews), the PtDAs were downloaded 10,000 times, and user feedback was positive. Our expert team showed feasible rapid development and wide dissemination of PtDAs to respond to urgent decisional needs. Development efficiencies included access to a well-tested theory-based PtDA template, recent evidence syntheses, and values-based public responses to media reports. Future research includes methods for rapidly collecting user feedback, facilitating implementation, and measuring use and outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(2): e2146798, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1694847

ABSTRACT

Importance: The incidence of infection during SARS-CoV-2 viral waves, the factors associated with infection, and the durability of antibody responses to infection among Canadian adults remain undocumented. Objective: To assess the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first 2 viral waves in Canada by measuring seropositivity among adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Action to Beat Coronavirus study conducted 2 rounds of an online survey about COVID-19 experience and analyzed immunoglobulin G levels based on participant-collected dried blood spots (DBS) to assess the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first and second viral waves in Canada. A sample of 19 994 Canadian adults (aged ≥18 years) was recruited from established members of the Angus Reid Forum, a public polling organization. The study comprised 2 phases (phase 1 from May 1 to September 30, 2020, and phase 2 from December 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021) that generally corresponded to the first (April 1 to July 31, 2020) and second (October 1, 2020, to March 1, 2021) viral waves. Main Outcomes and Measures: SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G seropositivity (using a chemiluminescence assay) by major geographic and demographic variables and correlation with COVID-19 symptom reporting. Results: Among 19 994 adults who completed the online questionnaire in phase 1, the mean (SD) age was 50.9 (15.4) years, and 10 522 participants (51.9%) were female; 2948 participants (14.5%) had self-identified racial and ethnic minority group status, and 1578 participants (8.2%) were self-identified Indigenous Canadians. Among participants in phase 1, 8967 had DBS testing. In phase 2, 14 621 adults completed online questionnaires, and 7102 of those had DBS testing. Of 19 994 adults who completed the online survey in phase 1, fewer had an educational level of some college or less (4747 individuals [33.1%]) compared with the general population in Canada (45.0%). Survey respondents were otherwise representative of the general population, including in prevalence of known risk factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among unvaccinated adults increased from 1.9% in phase 1 to 6.5% in phase 2. The seropositivity pattern was demographically and geographically heterogeneous during phase 1 but more homogeneous by phase 2 (with a cumulative incidence ranging from 6.4% to 7.0% in most regions). The exception was the Atlantic region, in which cumulative incidence reached only 3.3% (odds ratio [OR] vs Ontario, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.21-1.02). A total of 47 of 188 adults (25.3%) reporting COVID-19 symptoms during phase 2 were seropositive, and the OR of seropositivity for COVID-19 symptoms was 6.15 (95% CI, 2.02-18.69). In phase 2, 94 of 444 seropositive adults (22.2%) reported having no symptoms. Of 134 seropositive adults in phase 1 who were retested in phase 2, 111 individuals (81.8%) remained seropositive. Participants who had a history of diabetes (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38-0.90) had lower odds of having detectable antibodies in phase 2. Conclusions and Relevance: The Action to Beat Coronavirus study found that the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Canada was modest until March 2021, and this incidence was lower than the levels of population immunity required to substantially reduce transmission of the virus. Ongoing vaccination efforts remain central to reducing viral transmission and mortality. Assessment of future infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity is practicable through the use of serial online surveys and participant-collected DBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322524

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of infection in Canada’s COVID-19 viral waves, the predictors of infection, and the durability of antibody responses to infection remain undocumented.Methods: We organized serial online surveys of a representative group of Canadian adults about their COVID experience in the first (n=19 994;April-July 2020) and second viral wave (n=14 621;October 2020-March 2021). We paired these with IgG analysis of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in self-collected dried blood spots after the first (n=8967) and second (n=7102) waves.Findings: Canada’s cumulative seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 among unvaccinated adults rose from ~2% after the first wave to 7% after the second. The seropositivity pattern was heterogeneous demographically and geographically during the first wave, but more homogeneous by the second (except in the four Atlantic Provinces, cumulative seroprevalence ~3%). Seroprevalence among visible minorities rose sharply from about 2% to >8% from the first to second wave. About a quarter of those reporting COVID symptoms during the second wave were seropositive, and in both waves the odds ratio (OR) of seropositivity for COVID symptoms exceeded six. About one-fifth of seropositives reported no symptoms. Of 134 seropositive adults in the first wave who were retested after the second, 83% (111) remained seropositive at least seven months later. Current smokers and people with a history of diabetes had lower ORs of infection. We calculated the absolute numbers of seropositive adults nationwide, which nearly quadrupled from 0.57 million to 1.90 million, with the largest increases among older adults. Infection fatality rates fell from 3.7 to 2.6/1000 infections, most notably at older ages.Interpretation: Canada’s COVID pandemic grew substantially between the first and second viral waves. Home-based DBS collection offers a practicable way to document evolving demographic and geographic patterns and to assess the levels and durability of population immunity, including from SARS-CoV-2 vaccination.Funding: Pfizer Global Medical, Unity Health Foundation, and the Canadian COVID-19 Immunity Task Force. Declaration of Interest: None to declare. Ethical Approval: The Ab-C study was approved by the Unity Health Toronto Ethics Review Board.

7.
CMAJ ; 193(25): E969-E977, 2021 06 21.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280650

ABSTRACT

CONTEXTE: L'épidémiologie de l'infection au SRAS-CoV-2 dans les résidences pour aînés (offrant une aide à la vie autonome), est pour une bonne part inconnue. Nous avons étudié le lien entre les caractéristiques des résidences et des communautés avoisinantes et le risque d'éclosion de SRAS-CoV-2 dans les résidences pour aînés depuis le début de la première vague de la pandémie de COVID-19. MÉTHODES: Nous avons procédé à une étude de cohorte rétrospective dans la population des résidences pour aînés certifiées en Ontario, au Canada, entre le 1er mars et le 18 décembre 2020. Notre paramètre principal était toute éclosion de SRAS-CoV-2 (≥ 1 cas confirmé parmi les résidents ou le personnel au moyen d'un test d'amplification des acides nucléiques). Nous avons utilisé la méthode des risques proportionnels avec prédicteurs chronologiques pour modéliser les liens entre les caractéristiques des résidences et des communautés avoisinantes et les éclosions de SRAS-CoV-2. RÉSULTATS: Notre cohorte a inclus l'ensemble des 770 résidences privées pour aînés (RPA) certifiées en Ontario qui hébergeaient 56 491 résidents. On a dénombré 273 (35,5 %) résidences pour aînés qui ont connu 1 éclosion de SRAS-CoV-2 ou plus; 1944 résidents (3,5 %) et 1101 employés (3,0 %) ont contracté l'infection. Ces cas étaient inégalement distribués entre les résidences. En effet, 2487 cas parmi les résidents et le personnel (81,7 %) sont survenus dans 77 résidences (10 %). Le rapport de risque ajusté d'une éclosion de SRAS-CoV-2 dans une résidence a été clairement associé aux établissements qui avaient une grande capacité d'accueil, qui comportaient des unités de soins de longue durée, qui appartenaient à de plus grandes bannières et offraient plusieurs services sur place, qui se trouvaient dans des régions marquées par une hausse de l'incidence régionale de SRAS-CoV-2 et où la concentration ethnique à l'échelle de la communauté était supérieure. INTERPRÉTATION: Certaines caractéristiques facilement identifiables des résidences pour aînés sont associées de manière indépendante aux éclosions de SRAS-CoV-2 et peuvent faciliter l'évaluation des risques et orienter la priorisation de la vaccination.

8.
CMAJ ; 193(19): E672-E680, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection in retirement homes (also known as assisted living facilities) is largely unknown. We examined the association between home-and community-level characteristics and the risk of outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 infection in retirement homes since the beginning of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of licensed retirement homes in Ontario, Canada, from Mar. 1 to Dec. 18, 2020. Our primary outcome was an outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection (≥ 1 resident or staff case confirmed by validated nucleic acid amplification assay). We used time-dependent proportional hazards methods to model the associations between retirement home- and community-level characteristics and outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Our cohort included all 770 licensed retirement homes in Ontario, which housed 56 491 residents. There were 273 (35.5%) retirement homes with 1 or more outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 infection, involving 1944 (3.5%) residents and 1101 staff (3.0%). Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were distributed unevenly across retirement homes, with 2487 (81.7%) resident and staff cases occurring in 77 (10%) homes. The adjusted hazard of an outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection in a retirement home was positively associated with homes that had a large resident capacity, were co-located with a long-term care facility, were part of larger chains, offered many services onsite, saw increases in regional incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and were located in a region with a higher community-level ethnic concentration. INTERPRETATION: Readily identifiable characteristics of retirement homes are independently associated with outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 infection and can support risk identification and priority for vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Homes for the Aged , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Aged , Frail Elderly , Humans , Incidence , Ontario/epidemiology , Retirement , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Med Decis Making ; 41(2): 233-239, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969476

ABSTRACT

To meet urgent decisional needs of retirement/nursing home residents and their families, our interdisciplinary stakeholder team rapidly developed and disseminated patient decision aids (PtDAs) regarding leaving one's residence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The development steps were as follows: identify urgent decisional needs, develop PtDAs using the Ottawa Decision Support Framework template and minimal International PtDA Standards, obtain stakeholder feedback, broadly disseminate, and incorporate user feedback. Within 2 wk, we developed 2 PtDAs for retirement and nursing home living environments that were informed by decisional needs (identified from public responses to related media reports), current pandemic regulations/guidance, and recent systematic reviews. Within 3 wk of their dissemination (websites, international PtDA inventory, Twitter, Facebook, media interviews), the PtDAs were downloaded 10,000 times, and user feedback was positive. Our expert team showed feasible rapid development and wide dissemination of PtDAs to respond to urgent decisional needs. Development efficiencies included access to a well-tested theory-based PtDA template, recent evidence syntheses, and values-based public responses to media reports. Future research includes methods for rapidly collecting user feedback, facilitating implementation, and measuring use and outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Decision Making , Decision Support Techniques , Homes for the Aged , Nursing Homes , Patient Participation , Patient Transfer , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Family , Feasibility Studies , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Pandemics , Retirement , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation
12.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(10): 1365-1370.e7, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803008

ABSTRACT

During the first few months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Canadian nursing homes implemented strict no-visitor policies to reduce the risk of introducing COVID-19 in these settings. There are now growing concerns that the risks associated with restricted access to family caregivers and visitors have started to outweigh the potential benefits associated with preventing COVID-19 infections. Many residents have sustained severe and potentially irreversible physical, functional, cognitive, and mental health declines. As Canada emerges from its first wave of the pandemic, nursing homes across the country have cautiously started to reopen these settings, yet there is broad criticism that emerging visitor policies are overly restrictive, inequitable, and potentially harmful. We reviewed the nursing home visitor policies for Canada's 10 provinces and 3 territories as well as international policies and reports on the topic to develop 10 provi-informed, data-driven, and expert-reviewed guidance for the re-opening of Canadian nursing homes to family caregivers and visitors.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Loneliness/psychology , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Isolation/psychology , Aging/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Canada , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Health Policy , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL