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1.
J Int Med Res ; 49(11): 3000605211059939, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation are associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity. This study assessed D-dimer concentration and its correlation with inflammatory markers and COVID-19 severity. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 194 COVID-19 cases, with the severity of infection graded in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. We measured D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ferritin on admission and determined the cutoff values for D-dimer and CRP and evaluated the correlation between D-dimer and CRP and ferritin. RESULTS: Median D-dimer, CRP, and ferritin concentrations were 2240 µg/L, 73.2 mg/L, and 1173.8 µg/mL, respectively. The highest median D-dimer value was seen in mild and moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The highest ferritin concentration was seen in severe ARDS. There was a significant correlation between D-dimer value and CRP (r = 0.327), but no significant correlation between D-dimer and ferritin (r = 0.101). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L as a marker of COVID-19 severity was 0.722 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.615-0.781). CONCLUSION: The combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L can be used as marker of COVID-19 severity, with moderate accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitals , Humans , Indonesia , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Prim Care Diabetes ; 2021 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: While the higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) at younger age in Indonesia might contribute to the relatively higher COVID-19 mortality rate in Indonesia, there were currently no available evidence nor specific policy in terms of COVID-19 prevention and management among DM patients. We aimed to find out the association between diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) with COVID-19 mortality in Indonesia. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using Jakarta Province's COVID-19 epidemiological registry within the first 6 months of the pandemic. All COVID-19 confirmed patients, aged >15 years with known DM status were included. Patients were assessed for their clinical symptoms and mortality outcome based on their DM status. A multivariate Cox-regression test was performed to obtain the relative risk (RR) of COVID-19 mortality in the diagnosed DM group. RESULTS: Of 20,481 patients with COVID-19, 705 (3.4%) had DM. COVID-19 mortality rate in DM group was 21.28%, significantly higher compared to 2.77% mortality in the non-DM group [adjusted RR 1.98 (CI 95% 1.57-2.51), p < 0.001]. In addition, COVID-19 patients with DM generally developed more symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: DM is associated not only with development of more COVID-19 clinical symptoms, but also with a higher risk of COVID-19 mortality. This finding may provide a basis for future policy regarding COVID-19 prevention and management among diabetes patients in Indonesia.

3.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 6919-6924, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484926

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 is a pandemic with significant mortality and it is important to differentiate severe and non-severe cases. We conducted a study to evaluate hematologic profiles with inflammation markers in COVID-19 patients and to determine the correlation of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) with disease severity. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving hospitalized COVID-19 patients confirmed with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Lymphocyte count, NLR, C-reactive protein (CRP) and ferritin were evaluated in severe and non-severe COVID-19 cases at hospital admission. Data was analyzed using Spearman correlation. Results: There were 41 patients aged 20 to 79 years with COVID-19; 33 (80.5%) were non-severe, and 8 (19.5%) were severe cases. There is a statistically significant difference in WBC, relative neutrophils and lymphocytes, NLR, and CRP between non-severe and severe cases. There is a strong correlation between NLR and CRP (r = 0.738; p < 0.001). Our findings show that NLR and absolute lymphocyte count, but not ferritin, play a role in differentiating between non-severe and severe COVID-19 cases. Conclusion: In COVID-19 cases, a strong correlation between NLR and CRP might suggest the use of NLR to differentiate between non-severe and severe cases, especially in a remote healthcare facility.

4.
Jurnal Respirologi Indonesia ; 41(3):174-179, 2021.
Article in English | Indonesian Research | ID: covidwho-1390926

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) that has become a pandemic. It became apparent that COVID-19 transmitting from person to person. The clinical manifestations and characteristics of COVID-19 encompassing from asymptomatic infection until severe pneumonia and death. This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics between COVID-19 suspected patients and confirmed patients at an early pandemic in Jakarta Indonesia. Methods: a cross-sectional design was used in this study. Data were collected from march to April 2020 using the electronic health record reporting database initial laboratory tests and rt-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 results. There were 58 subjects: 43 COVID-19 confirmed patients and 15 COVID-19 suspected patients. Results: male was found predominantly in COVID-19 confirmed patients than female. The mean age of confirmed patients was 496 years old. Nearly half of the confirmed patients had comorbidities namely hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Fever and cough were the most common presenting symptoms and they were also found in suspected patients. Confirmed patients tended to have lymphopenia and neutrophilia. Pulmonary infiltrate was the most common feature in both confirmed and suspected patients. Conclusion: there were no significant differences found between COVID-19 confirmed and suspected cases regarding demographic characteristics comorbidities presenting symptoms physical examination results laboratory tests and chest x-ray results. Covid-19 confirmed patients had a history of exposure to COVID-19 confirmed patients.

5.
Jurnal Penyakit Dalam Indonesia ; 7(1):45-67, 2020.
Article in Indonesian | Indonesian Research | ID: covidwho-1235416

ABSTRACT

Pada awal 2020, dunia dikejutkan dengan mewabahnya pneumonia baru yang bermula dari Wuhan, Provinsi Hubei yang kemudian menyebar dengan cepat ke lebih dari 190 negara dan teritori. Wabah ini diberi nama coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) yang disebabkan oleh Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Penyebaran penyakit ini telah memberikan dampak luas secara sosial dan ekonomi. Masih banyak kontroversi seputar penyakit ini, termasuk dalam aspek penegakkan diagnosis, tata laksana, hingga pencegahan. Oleh karena itu, kami melakukan telaah terhadap studi-studi terkait COVID-19 yang telah banyak dipublikasikan sejak awal 2020 lalu sampai dengan akhir Maret 2020. Kata Kunci: COVID-19, pandemi, SARS-CoV-2, Wuhan Coronavirus Disease 2019: Review of Current Literatures

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