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1.
Journal of Agriculture Food Systems and Community Development ; 11(3):87-99, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1918018

ABSTRACT

This research brief presents results from a scan of peer-reviewed and grey literature published from March 2020 to the end of August 2021 looking at the impacts of COVID-19 on food security in Canada. The purpose of this literature scan is to look at how the national food-security landscape has shifted due to the pandemic and to analyze what these changes mean for civil society-led food movements working on the ground to enhance food systems sustainability and equity. This brief presents key findings from the literature scan focusing on food-security policy, programming, and funding;food security for individuals, households, and vulnerable populations;and food systems. We then draw on our collective experiences as food scholars and activists to discuss the implications of these findings for food movement organizing. Here, we focus on networks, policy advocacy, and local food systems as key considerations for food movements in a changing food-security landscape.

2.
Stat ; 10(1), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1598217

ABSTRACT

As of October 2020, the death toll from the COVID-19 pandemic has risen over 1.1 million deaths worldwide. Reliable estimates of mortality due to COVID-19 are important to guide intervention strategies such as lockdowns and social distancing measures. In this paper, we develop a data-driven model that accurately and consistently estimates COVID-19 mortality at the regional level early in the epidemic, using only daily mortality counts as the input. We use a Bayesian hierarchical skew-normal model with day-of-the-week parameters to provide accurate projections of COVID-19 mortality. We validate our projections by comparing our model to the projections made by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and highlight the importance of hierarchicalization and day-of-the-week effect estimation. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

4.
Journal of Burn Care and Research ; 42(SUPPL 1):S149, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1288071

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Globally, medical centers have faced unprecedented times with the onset of the Novel Coronavirus pandemic. Emergency departments (ED) and burn units have had to adapt to uncertainty and new challenges. At our institution, we had to alter our daily burn practice, physically moving our burn unit to our surgical intensive care unit to accommodate staff cohorting. While some hospitals have seen patient surges, most have endured dramatic decreases in productivity. A UK burn unit documented lower ED presentations and reduced referrals from other centers, with 50% fewer patients admitted to their burns ward (Farroha). In Israel, a 66% decrease in adult burn patients was noted (Kruchevska et al.). We sought to identify the impact of COVID-19 on burn injury epidemiology in our burn unit based in a large, urban, academic medical center. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of our burn database for ED visits and admissions related to burn injuries between March 1st and June 30th in the years 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020. We looked at the age and sex of patient, type of visit, length of stay (LOS), the mechanism of injury, the setting in which injury occurred, and the details of the injury. We compare annual trends, with emphasis on comparison of 2020 to previous years. Results: From admissions and ED data records, 215 patient encounters were reviewed. We saw a yearly rise in total burn patients seen in the ED or admitted to our burn unit 2017-2020 (39, 43, 63, and 70 respectively) with the highest volume of patients in 2020. Mean patient age ranged from 45 (2020) to 51 (2017). More males were burned in all years (male:female ratio 3.9 in 2017, 2.1 in 2018, 2.5 in 2019, 1.9 in 2020). Median LOS in 2020 was 2.5 days, consistent with 2017-2019 values (2, 3, 3, respectively). Between 2017 and 2019, 10%, 2%, and 8% respectively of patients evaluated were treated on an outpatient basis, while in 2020, 20% were outpatient. Rates of flash, scald, flame, chemical, electrical, and contact burns were stable over the period. Of those patients who were admitted, 1.8% sustained workrelated burns in 2020 versus 8.9% over 2017-2019. In 2020, 23% of burns were cooking related versus 18% over the prior 3 years. Conclusions: Despite documented decreased burn admissions in some units, our unit saw an increase in burn injuries presenting for evaluation in the first 3 months of the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the analogous period in the three years prior. Burns were less often tied to workrelated incidents and more frequently related to cooking injuries. Even with more patients treated and released from the ED, inpatient admission numbers were maintained. These findings support the importance of protecting our staffing and burn unit resources in a pandemic setting in order to appropriately treat regional patients and an increase in home-based injuries.

5.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 31:306, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-984274

ABSTRACT

Background: During the initial phase of the SARS CoV-2 pandemic our institution had high rates of acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Nephrocheck (NC), a renal biomarker, indicating renal stress was the basis of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) program to identify patients at risk for AKI & RRT. Methods: Patients admitted from 4/17-5/15/2020 were all tested for SARS CoV-2. All positive patients ≥ 18 years old & with a creatinine <2.0 mg were tested with NC. Values ≥ 0.7 led to nephrology consults & utilization of a renal-protective strategy including monitoring volume status, scrutinizing nephrotoxic medications & urine studies. A 'Plan-Do-Study-Act' approach was used to increase utilization of NC and the resulting protocol for positive results. Intervention was biphasic with a follow up maintenance phase, each lasting 10 days. Phase 1 was adding NC to the SARS CoV2 admission order set & Phase 2 was educating hospitalist providers about using and interpreting NC to increase appropriate nephrology consults. Education was reinforced with protocol cards & reminders via encrypted text services. Additionally, intervention team members reviewed charts daily & reminded providers in real time. Results: In Phase 1, 58% of the SARS CoV-2 positive patients had a NC but only 48% of NC positive patients had a renal consult. In Phase 2, 79% of SARS CoV-2 positive patients had a NC with 80% of positive patients getting a renal consult. In the maintenance phase, 67% of SARS CoV-2 positive patients had NC with 59% of NC positive patients getting a renal consult. Conclusions: During our CQI project, efforts to mitigate severe AKI by using a biomarker-based alert for nephrology consultation saw the number of SARS CoV2 positive patients screened with NC & the number of positive NC patients seen by nephrologists rise significantly. Barriers to implementation included the weekly turn-over of house staff & a reliable alert system to ensure adequate screening. The multidisciplinary team reviewing charts and reminding hospitalists of the protocol also helped significantly but was difficult to sustain.

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