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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1):4931, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2000888

ABSTRACT

Anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies are mainstay COVID-19 therapeutics. Safety, antiviral, and clinical efficacy of bamlanivimab were evaluated in the randomized controlled trial ACTIV-2/A5401. Non-hospitalized adults were randomized 1:1 within 10 days of COVID-19 symptoms to bamlanivimab or blinded-placebo in two dose-cohorts (7000 mg, n = 94;700 mg, n = 223). No differences in bamlanivimab vs placebo were observed in the primary outcomes: proportion with undetectable nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 RNA at days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 (risk ratio = 0.82-1.05 for 7000 mg [p(overall) = 0.88] and 0.81-1.21 for 700 mg [p(overall) = 0.49]), time to symptom improvement (median 21 vs 18.5 days [p = 0.97], 7000 mg;24 vs 20.5 days [p = 0.08], 700 mg), or grade 3+ adverse events. However, bamlanivimab was associated with lower day 3 nasopharyngeal viral levels and faster reductions in inflammatory markers and viral decay by modeling. This study provides evidence of faster reductions in nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels but not shorter symptom durations in non-hospitalized adults with early variants of SARS-CoV-2.

2.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):173, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880928

ABSTRACT

Background: The discovery and development of SARS-CoV-2 therapies remains a priority. SAB-185 is a Transchromosomic, bovine-derived, fully human polyclonal immunoglobulin product for SARS-CoV-2 being studied in ACTIV-2, randomized controlled platform trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of investigational agents for non-hospitalized adults with mild-moderate COVID-19 Methods: This Phase II trial was a superiority comparison of SAB-185 vs. placebo. Participants with confirmed SAR-CoV-2 infection received intravenous infusion of SAB-185 (3,840 Units/kg) or placebo. Primary outcome measures were proportion of participants with SARS-CoV-2 RNA < lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) in nasopharyngeal (NP) swab, time to improvement in targeted symptoms for 2 consecutive days after Day 0, and safety through Day 28. Secondary outcomes included quantitative NP RNA levels and all-cause hospitalizations and deaths. Antiviral or clinical efficacy and safety criteria for graduation to Phase III were pre-specified. Results: From April to August 2021, randomized participants from 42 sites in the US received SAB-185 (N=107) or placebo (N=106). Median age was 38 years (quartiles: 30,48), 54% female, >98% cis-gender, 7% Black/African-American, 50% Hispanic, and 11% were classified as high-risk for COVID-19 progression, with median 4 days (3,6) from symptom onset. Day 0 NP SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels were similar between SAB-185 and placebo: 4.80 vs 4.80 log10 copies/ml. No differences were observed in the proportion with NP SARS-CoV-2 RNA< lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) in nasopharyngeal (NP) swab, time to improvement in targeted symptoms for 2 consecutive days after Day 0, and safety through Day 28. Secondary outcomes included quantitative NP RNA levels and all-cause hospitalizations and deaths. Antiviral or clinical efficacy and safety criteria for graduation to phase 3 were pre-specified. Conclusion: SAB-185 was safe in this Phase II study. While no significant differences to placebo were seen in symptom duration and proportion of participants with NP SARS-CoV-2 RNA< lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) in nasopharyngeal (NP) swab, time to improvement in targeted symptoms for 2 consecutive days after Day 0, and safety through Day 28. Secondary outcomes included quantitative NP RNA levels and all-cause hospitalizations and deaths. Antiviral or clinical efficacy and safety criteria for graduation to phase 3 were pre-specified.

3.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):41, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880388

ABSTRACT

Background: Camostat, a serine protease inhibitor, prevents activation of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. We studied the safety and antiviral and clinical efficacy of orally administered camostat in non-hospitalized adults with mild-moderate COVID-19. Methods: ACTIV-2/A5401 is a platform trial to evaluate therapies for non-hospitalized adults with mild-moderate COVID-19. In a Phase II portion of the study, participants were enrolled within 10 days of COVID-19 related symptom onset and randomized to camostat 200 mg orally every 6 hours for 7 days or the pooled placebo group. Objectives were to evaluate the safety and efficacy of camostat to reduce the duration of COVID-19 symptoms and increase the proportion of participants with SARS-CoV-2 RNA below the lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs on days 3, 7, and 14. Participants completed a study diary from day 0 to day 28 scoring COVID-19 symptoms as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. Results: Of the 224 participants enrolled from 54 US sites, 215 participants (108 camostat, 107 placebo) initiated study intervention and formed the modified intent-to-treat population. Fifty-four percent were female, >99% cis-gender, 85% White, 9% Black, and 51% Latinx. Median age was 37 years;47% reported ≤5 days of symptoms at study entry and 26% met the protocol definition of higher risk of progression to severe COVID-19. Most frequent symptoms on day 0 were cough (86%), fatigue (85%), nasal obstruction/congestion (71%) and body/muscle aches (71%). There was no significant difference between camostat and placebo arms in grade 3 or higher adverse events (7.4% vs. 6.5%, respectively). Median (Q1, Q3) time to symptom improvement was 9 days for both camostat (5, 20) and placebo (6, 19). There were no significant differences in the proportion of participants with NP SARS-CoV-2 RNA<="" div=""> Conclusion: Camostat was well-tolerated. Despite compelling in vitro data, camostat did not show evidence of antiviral or clinical efficacy in ACTIV-2/A5401. This highlights the critical importance of randomized controlled trials in the evaluation of therapies for COVID-19.

4.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):246, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880203

ABSTRACT

Background: Randomized COVID-19 trials provide opportunities to describe post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC)-related symptom burden longitudinally and assess the impact of early use of antivirals on PASC prevalence. Methods: ACTIV-2 evaluates safety and efficacy of investigational agents for non-hospitalized adults with mild to moderate COVID-19 in a Phase II/III trial. In Phase II, participants were randomized within 10 days of symptom onset and a positive SARS-CoV-2 virologic test to receive bamlanivimab (BAM) or placebo as a single infusion at 7000mg (n=94) or 700mg (n=225). In a subsequent single-arm open-label study, 1059 participants received 700mg BAM. Participants completed a 13-symptom daily diary from enrollment through Day 28. A long-term (LT) diary (14 additional symptoms) introduced after the study was underway was completed by a subset of individuals every 12 weeks. We report Week 24 findings. Results: Between Aug 2020 to Feb 2021 605 participants enrolled and completed LT diary at Week 24 [Phase II: 7000mg vs. placebo (n=25);700mg vs. placebo (n=68);single-arm open-label cohort: 700mg (n=512)]. Median age was 50 years, 51% female sex, 99% identified as cis-gender, 5% Black/African American, and 35% Hispanic/Latino. At enrollment, 53% reported ≥1 high-risk comorbidity and 0.3% were vaccinated against COVID-19. By Week 24, 14% (87/605) had not returned to their pre-COVID-19 health by self-report, with 57% (50/87) reporting ≥3 PASC symptoms. The most common symptoms were fatigue (45% of 87), smell disorder (36%), breathing difficulties (30%), taste disorders (25%), musculoskeletal pain (26%) or weakness (23%), and cognitive complaints: difficulty concentrating/thinking (30%), difficulty reasoning and solving problems (21%), memory loss (25%) and insomnia (23%). Most reported symptoms as "mild". Participants who reported acute viral illness symptoms between Days 22-28 were more likely to report PASC symptoms at Week 24 than those who did not report symptoms at Days 22-28 [51% (164/320) vs. 27% (76/285);p<0.0001]. Conclusion: In outpatients with mild to moderate COVID-19, 14% had not returned to pre-COVID-19 health by 24 weeks post infection, with generally mild but multiple symptoms. Presence of acute viral illness symptoms at 3-4 weeks was associated with an increased risk of PASC symptoms months later. Larger placebo-controlled studies within ACTIV-2 will assess the potential for early antiviral therapies to mitigate or prevent PASC.

5.
Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326837

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccines elicit memory T cell responses. Here, we report the development of two new pools of Experimentally-defined T cell epitopes derived from the non-spike Remainder of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome (CD4RE and CD8RE). The combination of T cell responses to these new pools and Spike (S) were used to discriminate four groups of subjects with different SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccine status: non-infected, non-vaccinated (I-V-);infected and non-vaccinated (I+V-);infected and then vaccinated (I+V+);and non-infected and vaccinated (I-V+). The overall classification accuracy based on 30 subjects/group was 89.2% in the original cohort and 88.5% in a validation cohort of 96 subjects. The T cell classification scheme was applicable to different mRNA vaccines, and different lengths of time post-infection/post-vaccination. T cell responses from breakthrough infections (infected vaccinees, V+I+) were also effectively segregated from the responses of vaccinated subjects using the same classification tool system. When all five groups where combined, for a total of 239 different subjects, the classification scheme performance was 86.6%. We anticipate that a T cell-based immunodiagnostic scheme able to classify subjects based on their vaccination and natural infection history will be an important tool for longitudinal monitoring of vaccination and aid in establishing SARS-CoV-2 correlates of protection.

6.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326687

ABSTRACT

The emergence of current SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) and potential future spillovers of SARS-like coronaviruses into humans pose a major threat to human health and the global economy 1-7 . Development of broadly effective coronavirus vaccines that can mitigate these threats is needed 8, 9 . Notably, several recent studies have revealed that vaccination of recovered COVID-19 donors results in enhanced nAb responses compared to SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination alone 10-13 . Here, we utilized a targeted donor selection strategy to isolate a large panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to sarbecoviruses from two such donors. Many of the bnAbs are remarkably effective in neutralization against sarbecoviruses that use ACE2 for viral entry and a substantial fraction also show notable binding to non-ACE2-using sarbecoviruses. The bnAbs are equally effective against most SARS-CoV-2 VOCs and many neutralize the Omicron variant. Neutralization breadth is achieved by bnAb binding to epitopes on a relatively conserved face of the receptor binding domain (RBD) as opposed to strain-specific nAbs to the receptor binding site that are commonly elicited in SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination 14-18 . Consistent with targeting of conserved sites, select RBD bnAbs exhibited in vivo protective efficacy against diverse SARS-like coronaviruses in a prophylaxis challenge model. The generation of a large panel of potent bnAbs provides new opportunities and choices for next-generation antibody prophylactic and therapeutic applications and, importantly, provides a molecular basis for effective design of pan-sarbecovirus vaccines.

7.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326686

ABSTRACT

Resistance mutations to monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy has been reported, but in the non-immunosuppressed population, it is unclear if in vivo emergence of SARS-CoV-2 resistance mutations alters either viral replication dynamics or therapeutic efficacy. In ACTIV-2/A5401, non-hospitalized participants with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection were randomized to bamlanivimab (700mg or 7000mg) or placebo. Treatment-emergent resistance mutations were significantly more likely detected after bamlanivimab 700mg treatment than placebo (7% of 111 vs 0% of 112 participants, P=0.003). There were no treatment-emergent resistance mutations among the 48 participants who received bamlanivimab 7000mg. Participants with emerging mAb resistant virus had significantly higher pre-treatment nasopharyngeal and anterior nasal viral load. Intensive respiratory tract viral sampling revealed the dynamic nature of SARS-CoV-2 evolution, with evidence of rapid and sustained viral rebound after emergence of resistance mutations, and worsened symptom severity. Participants with emerging bamlanivimab resistance often accumulated additional polymorphisms found in current variants of concern/interest and associated with immune escape. These results highlight the potential for rapid emergence of resistance during mAb monotherapy treatment, resulting in prolonged high level respiratory tract viral loads and clinical worsening. Careful virologic assessment should be prioritized during the development and clinical implementation of antiviral treatments for COVID-19.

8.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326636

ABSTRACT

Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to coronaviruses (CoVs) are valuable in their own right as prophylactic and therapeutic reagents to treat diverse CoVs and, importantly, as templates for rational pan-CoV vaccine design. We recently described a bnAb, CC40.8, from a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-convalescent donor that exhibits broad reactivity with human beta-coronaviruses (beta-CoVs). Here, we showed that CC40.8 targets the conserved S2 stem-helix region of the coronavirus spike fusion machinery. We determined a crystal structure of CC40.8 Fab with a SARS-CoV-2 S2 stem-peptide at 1.6 A resolution and found that the peptide adopted a mainly helical structure. Conserved residues in beta-CoVs interacted with CC40.8 antibody, thereby providing a molecular basis for its broad reactivity. CC40.8 exhibited in vivo protective efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in two animal models. In both models, CC40.8-treated animals exhibited less weight loss and reduced lung viral titers compared to controls. Furthermore, we noted CC40.8-like bnAbs are relatively rare in human COVID-19 infection and therefore their elicitation may require rational structure-based vaccine design strategies. Overall, our study describes a target on beta-CoV spike proteins for protective antibodies that may facilitate the development of pan-beta-CoV vaccines. SUMMARY: A human mAb isolated from a COVID-19 donor defines a protective cross-neutralizing epitope for pan-beta-CoV vaccine design strategies.

9.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(12): 2314-2317, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592199

ABSTRACT

The emergence of new variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) herald a new phase of the pandemic. This study used state-of-the-art phylodynamic methods to ascertain that the rapid rise of B.1.1.7 "Variant of Concern" most likely occurred by global dispersal rather than convergent evolution from multiple sources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Phylogeny
10.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):244, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250848

ABSTRACT

Background: As countries around the world review interventions for containing the COVID-19 pandemic, movement of populations has been identified as a key factor of viral dispersal and limiting the population flow intensity has been applied to contain the current COVID-19 epidemic. Evolutionary analyses of well-annotated sequencing data can provide insights into viral transmission dynamics. Herein, we characterized the dynamics of COVID-19 transmission within California and across the Mexico-California (MX/CA) border, the busiest land border-crossing area in the world, to inform the containment policy in this binational context. Methods: All publicly available SARS-CoV-2 full genome sequences (human host) available on the GISAID database were collected (as of Nov. 16th, 2020). After sequence curation, a multistep phylogenetic approach was applied to identify putative clusters of transmission within CA (across counties), MX (across states) and across the MX/CA border. These clades were analyzed with a discrete phylogeographic model to evaluate transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in the MX/CA region. Results: From a total of 174,324 SARS-CoV-2 sequences including 5,471 sequences from Mexico (7 States, n=223)/California (29 counties, n=5,248), we identified 622 unique introduction events into the study region, including 381 clusters of size ≥3 from ≥2 locations (i.e. CA county and/or MX state). Of these, 339 (89%) clusters were from CA only across 23 counties, 5 (1.3%) were from MX only across 6 states and 38 (10%) included sequences from both CA and MX Discrete phylogeographic analysis revealed a complex viral migration network within CA/MX and across the border (Figure 1A, left panel). Analyses of the 38 clusters including sequences from CA and MEX showed bidirectional migration events across the border (Figure 1B). In particular we showed migration events in the border region from the border state of Baja California, MX to the border county of San Diego, CA and from the border county of Imperial County, CA to the border state of Sonora, MX (Figure 1A, right panel). Conclusion: This comprehensive analysis of all publicly available COVID-19 sequences showed local transmission across regions within CA and MX as well as across neighboring locations across the border. Similar to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, the MX/CA border does not appear to be a major barrier to the spread of COVID-19, necessitating coordinated transnational intervention approaches.

11.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):10, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250717

ABSTRACT

Attendees to this presentation will be introduced to currently available and promising antiviral agents for SARS-CoV-2. These agents will include monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, protease inhibitors, interferon-based agents, and small molecule drugs. The presentation will also touch on how viral variants of concern may impact the activity of some of these agents.

12.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):269-270, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250626

ABSTRACT

Background: Closing labs to decrease spread of COVID-19 has impacted research progress. Serial testing could supplement other measures to help provide a safe lab environment. Methods: Lab employees who came to work at an academic laboratory at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) were invited and consented to perform their own anterior nasal swab or have a swab collected by an on-site physician. Nasal swabs were combined into one pool for each work shift. Each pool underwent nucleic acid testing (NAT) via qRT-PCR to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA (FluxErgy). Results were available within one hour. Positive pools were deconvoluted and tested individually. Cost evaluation of the pooling approach was compared to individual NAT and to institutional guidelines for lab occupancy. Results: From Apr 9 to Oct 26, 2020 (28 weeks), 1,199 nasal swab samples collected from lab workers were batched in 194 pools of median size 7 [95%I: 3-11]. A median of 41 tests per week [95%I: 22-67] were performed in a total of 77 participants (Fig 1). 19 core staff were tested a median 54 times [95%I:13-95]. Of the 194 pools, 7 (3.6%, n=47 samples) were considered positive and required repeat testing of all participant samples in the pool as confirmation. One true positive was identified before work started. That participant was referred to their primary care provider. This early detection prevented a 2-week quarantine of 7 employees. Given ∼$65/hour salary per lab worker, this saved 420 hours of work and ∼$26,600 in wages. Current UCSD guidelines recommend decreasing staffing levels to 25% of pre-COVID-19 occupancy. Regular NAT allowed 100% staffing. Screening of lab technicians with the pooled NAT strategy over 6 months cost $25,740 but permitted 2,430 person-hours of additional work ($132,210 in wages), as compared to the recommended 75% reduction without testing. A similar approach with individual NAT would cost $124,020 (thus $98,280 saved by pooling). Conclusion: Regular pooled NAT for SARS-CoV-2 among lab personnel offers a cost-efficient way to maintain a safe lab environment without a reduction in staffing. This approach could be applied in other settings to help ensure safe work environments.

13.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):210-211, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250023

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between nasopharyngeal (NP) SARS-CoV-2 RNA, demographics and symptom characteristics in non-hospitalized persons with COVID-19 is not well described. Methods: ACTIV-2 is a phase 2/3 adaptive platform trial testing antivirals for SARS-CoV-2 in symptomatic non-hospitalized adults. We analyzed associations between NP quantitative SARS-CoV-2 RNA (Abbott m2000sp/rt) and COVID-19 symptomatology in 284 participants with both a NP swab and symptom diary prior to study intervention. The diary included 13 targeted symptoms and questions about overall severity of COVID-19 symptoms, each scored as none, mild, moderate, or severe (and very severe for overall severity) and general physical health (scored as poor, fair, good, very good, excellent). Wilcoxon tests were used to compare NP RNA levels between pre-defined groups. Spearman correlations, Jonchkeere-Terpstra trend tests, and linear regressions evaluated associations between symptom measures and NP RNA. Results: Participants were 49% female, 82% white, 9% black, and 27% Latinx. Median age was 46 years and 50% met the protocol definition of higher risk for COVID-19 progression (age ≥55 years and/or protocol-defined comorbidities);32% reported moderate and 5% severe symptoms. Median (Q1, Q3) time from onset of symptoms to NP swab/symptom assessment was 6 (4, 8) days. NP RNA was above the lower limit of quantification in 85%;median (Q1, Q3) was 5.4 (3.5, 6.8) log10 copies/mL. Higher RNA levels were associated with shorter symptom duration (median 6.5 vs 4.7 log10 copies/mL for ≤5 vs >5 days) but not total symptom score (Figure). Controlling for symptom duration, higher NP RNA levels were associated with better general physical health (p=0.02) and more severe body/muscle pain (p=0.04). No associations were observed with symptom severity (sum of scores or overall severity) or any other symptoms. There was no association between NP RNA and age or risk category for COVID-19 progression. Conclusion: In symptomatic outpatients, NP SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels were higher in persons with more recent symptom onset, but were not associated with symptom severity or risk for disease progression. The range of viral RNA shedding was remarkably similar across the range of symptom severity, suggesting symptom severity may not correlate with transmission risk or the potential to respond to antiviral therapy. Outpatient trials aimed at evaluating antiviral activity of new agents should focus enrollment on participants with recent onset of symptoms. (Figure Presented).

14.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):140-141, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250022

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the substantial morbidity but low rates of hospitalization and death among outpatients with COVID-19, symptom outcome measures should be considered for primary efficacy assessment in phase 3 treatment trials. We analyzed potential measures utilizing the ACTIV-2 participant diary. Methods: Data from the first 95 participants in ACTIV-2 were included. All had symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and received blinded bamlanivimab 7000 mg/placebo. The symptom diary was completed by participants prior to treatment (Day 0) and then daily for 28 days. It included 13 targeted symptoms scored as absent, mild, moderate, or severe, and a question about whether they had returned to pre-COVID-19 health. Without unblinding, 3 candidate symptom outcome measures were assessed: A) time to confirmed (2 consecutive days) absence of all targeted symptoms, B) time to all targeted symptoms confirmed to be mild or absent, and C) time to confirmed improvement in all targeted symptoms. Median time to outcome was estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: Of the 95 participants, 53% were female, 82% white, and 33% Latinx. Median age was 44 years;46% were age ≥55 years and/or had protocol-defined comorbidities. Median time from COVID-19 symptom onset to randomization was 6 days. Prevalence of each targeted symptom on Day 0 ranged from 6% vomiting to 87% fatigue. Candidate outcome B was met in median 2 days due to 29% of participants having only mild symptoms at Day 0. For candidate outcomes A and C, median time was 11 and 8 days, with 26% and 16%, respectively, not meeting the outcome by 28 days. These candidate outcomes (A and C) were associated with a participant's confirmed assessment of return to pre-COVID-19 health (Figure). For all measures, increasing the consecutive days required for confirmation from 2 to 3 or 4 had a modest impact on median time to the outcome being met, consistent with few participants experiencing relapsing symptoms. Conclusion: Outcomes based on symptom resolution (A) or improvement (C) are promising for evaluating COVID-19 treatment response, with good internal validity with self-assessment of return to pre-COVID-19 health. A valid symptom outcome measure may be preferred over hospitalization/death as a primary outcome for outpatient COVID-19 treatment trials as most participants achieve the outcome, increasing power to compare treatments, especially among participants who are at low risk for hospitalization/death.

15.
J Hosp Infect ; 106(3): 570-576, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identifying the extent of environmental contamination of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential for infection control and prevention. The extent of environmental contamination has not been fully investigated in the context of severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients. AIM: To investigate environmental SARS-CoV-2 contamination in the isolation rooms of severe COVID-19 patients requiring mechanical ventilation or high-flow oxygen therapy. METHODS: Environmental swab samples and air samples were collected from the isolation rooms of three COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia. Patients 1 and 2 received mechanical ventilation with a closed suction system, while patient 3 received high-flow oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) was used to detect SARS-CoV-2; viral cultures were performed for samples not negative on rRT-PCR. FINDINGS: Of the 48 swab samples collected in the rooms of patients 1 and 2, only samples from the outside surfaces of the endotracheal tubes tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by rRT-PCR. However, in patient 3's room, 13 of the 28 environmental samples (fomites, fixed structures, and ventilation exit on the ceiling) showed positive results. Air samples were negative for SARS-CoV-2. Viable viruses were identified on the surface of the endotracheal tube of patient 1 and seven sites in patient 3's room. CONCLUSION: Environmental contamination of SARS-CoV-2 may be a route of viral transmission. However, it might be minimized when patients receive mechanical ventilation with a closed suction system. These findings can provide evidence for guidelines for the safe use of personal protective equipment.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Decontamination/standards , Environmental Pollution/analysis , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/standards , Patients' Rooms/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/standards , Air Microbiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics
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