Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(5): 897-900, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702282

ABSTRACT

Little is known about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 "vaccine-breakthrough" infections (VBIs). Here we characterize 24 VBIs in predominantly young healthy persons. While none required hospitalization, a proportion endorsed severe symptoms and shed live virus as high as 4.13 × 103 plaque-forming units/mL. Infecting genotypes included both variant-of-concern (VOC) and non-VOC strains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Genetic Variation , Humans , Phenotype , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic , Virus Shedding
2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 836658, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686498

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants complicates efforts to control the COVID-19 pandemic. Increasing genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 is imperative for early detection of emerging variants, to trace the movement of variants, and to monitor effectiveness of countermeasures. Additionally, determining the amount of viable virus present in clinical samples is helpful to better understand the impact these variants have on viral shedding. In this study, we analyzed nasal swab samples collected between March 2020 and early November 2021 from a cohort of United States (U.S.) military personnel and healthcare system beneficiaries stationed worldwide as a part of the Defense Health Agency's (DHA) Global Emerging Infections Surveillance (GEIS) program. SARS-CoV-2 quantitative real time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) positive samples were characterized by next-generation sequencing and a subset was analyzed for isolation and quantification of viable virus. Not surprisingly, we found that the Delta variant is the predominant strain circulating among U.S. military personnel beginning in July 2021 and primarily represents cases of vaccine breakthrough infections (VBIs). Among VBIs, we found a 50-fold increase in viable virus in nasal swab samples from Delta variant cases when compared to cases involving other variants. Notably, we found a 40-fold increase in viable virus in nasal swab samples from VBIs involving Delta as compared to unvaccinated personnel infected with other variants prior to the availability of approved vaccines. This study provides important insight about the genomic and virological characterization of SARS-CoV-2 isolates from a unique study population with a global presence.

5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(5): 897-900, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266109

ABSTRACT

Little is known about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 "vaccine-breakthrough" infections (VBIs). Here we characterize 24 VBIs in predominantly young healthy persons. While none required hospitalization, a proportion endorsed severe symptoms and shed live virus as high as 4.13 × 103 plaque-forming units/mL. Infecting genotypes included both variant-of-concern (VOC) and non-VOC strains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Genetic Variation , Humans , Phenotype , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic , Virus Shedding
6.
J Neurotrauma ; 38(1): 1-43, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066221

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus attacks multiple organs of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, including the brain. There are worldwide descriptions of neurological deficits in COVID-19 patients. Central nervous system (CNS) symptoms can be present early in the course of the disease. As many as 55% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients have been reported to have neurological disturbances three months after infection by SARS-CoV-2. The mutability of the SARS-COV-2 virus and its potential to directly affect the CNS highlight the urgency of developing technology to diagnose, manage, and treat brain injury in COVID-19 patients. The pathobiology of CNS infection by SARS-CoV-2 and the associated neurological sequelae of this infection remain poorly understood. In this review, we outline the rationale for the use of blood biomarkers (BBs) for diagnosis of brain injury in COVID-19 patients, the research needed to incorporate their use into clinical practice, and the improvements in patient management and outcomes that can result. BBs of brain injury could potentially provide tools for detection of brain injury in COVID-19 patients. Elevations of BBs have been reported in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of COVID-19 patients. BB proteins have been analyzed in CSF to detect CNS involvement in patients with infectious diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculous meningitis. BBs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for diagnosis of mild versus moderate traumatic brain injury and have identified brain injury after stroke, cardiac arrest, hypoxia, and epilepsy. BBs, integrated with other diagnostic tools, could enhance understanding of viral mechanisms of brain injury, predict severity of neurological deficits, guide triage of patients and assignment to appropriate medical pathways, and assess efficacy of therapeutic interventions in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/blood , Brain Injuries/diagnosis , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/pathology , Brain Injuries/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/blood , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL