Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 39
Filter
1.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International ; 59(2):131-141, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20244740

ABSTRACT

Many countries have doctoral viva examinations, mostly conducted in-person until the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores the changing processes and experiences of doctoral vivas forced online, from the perspectives of three examiners (two Uk, one NZ) and one recent candidate (UK). It sheds light on remote viva examinations exploring experiences of examination rigour, opportunities to evidence 'doctorateness' and challenges and affordances of remoteness, home location and technology. We use autoethnography, focusing on our experiences including the personal, learning and institutional dimensions. We found virtual spaces had advantages (comfort) and disadvantages (emotional difficulties), and levels of worry were often higher, especially regarding IT. Online formats still enabled examiners to rigorously assess 'doctorateness', but duty of care is needed for candidates with anxiety exacerbated by the pandemic, or technology. Our study offers insiders' insights into the remote online viva itself with recommendations for candidates, examiners and institutions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
NASN Sch Nurse ; : 1942602X231172200, 2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235762

ABSTRACT

School nurse administrators increasingly express concerns over the availability of substitute school nurses with return to in-person learning after the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. While healthcare staffing concerns and shortages are not unique to the school setting, the increasing health acuity of the student population, delegation principles, and staffing models complicate the issue. Traditional methods of covering absences may no longer suffice. In this article, five school nurse administrators share strategies, comparing pre-pandemic to current day facilitation of providing coverage for the absences of their healthcare staff.

3.
Comp Med ; 73(3): 187-193, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243092

ABSTRACT

Domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) have been used in biomedical research to study influenza viruses since the early 20th century. Ferrets have continued to gain importance for the study of viral respiratory disease due to their disease susceptibility and anatomic similarities to humans. Here we review features of ferret biology and management that should be considered when planning to work with this species, particularly in models of respiratory disease. We specifically discuss biosafety and husbandry, clinical and pathologic assessments, and anesthetic considerations for ferrets with respiratory disease and systemic illness. These considerations are important for animal welfare, fidelity of the model to human disease, and ensuring accuracy and reproducibility of acquired data. Finally, we briefly review the use of ferrets to study respiratory diseases by discussing their respiratory anatomy and 2 frequently studied viral respiratory diseases, influenza and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ferrets , Animals , Reproducibility of Results
4.
Health Commun ; : 1-11, 2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322787

ABSTRACT

Efforts by universities to reduce the spread of COVID-19 include health campaigns intended to encourage students to wear masks. While well-intended, these efforts may produce counter-persuasion (e.g., decrease masking) if they are seen as threatening individuals' freedom to choose. In a rolling cross-sectional study of one university campaign (n = 681), we found that the presence of the campaign did instigate a form of resistance known as reactance and that reactance was negatively associated with masking behavior. Masking was also diminished by the frequency with which respondents observed others not wearing a mask (anti-masking descriptive norm) and the frequency with which respondents observed others expressing disdain for masking (anti-masking injunctive norm). Most of these findings were magnified among students who identified as politically conservative. There was no evidence that the frequency of seeing others speak in favor of masks (pro-masking injunctive norm) produced an increase in masking. The results provide valuable theoretical insights into the causes of reactance and empirical evidence of the risks associated with student-oriented COVID safety campaigns.

5.
PLOS Glob Public Health ; 3(5): e0000786, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320004

ABSTRACT

From 2020, COVID-19 spread rapidly around the globe and continues to have a major impact on health system functioning, with a disproportionate impact on low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Reduced service utilisation and coverage of essential childbirth interventions is likely impacting maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Telehealth has been identified as an important tool in the continued provision of essential healthcare services. The aim of this study was to explore the experience and impact of implementing telehealth services for the provision of remote antenatal (ANC) and postnatal (PNC) contacts in regions of Bangladesh and Lao People's Democratic Republic through 100 semi-structured interviews with health service leaders and providers, and childbearing women who organised, provided, or were the recipients of ANC and PNC telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic response. The findings showed that a sudden pivot from face-to-face to telehealth services posed both health system and provision of care challenges. Health systems lacked funding to support telehealth and the infrastructure needed for service changes; however, some were able to work with key maternal child health departments within Ministries of Health to find the resources to implement the services. Health providers found telehealth beneficial during the pandemic response but identified a lack of training, guidance, and support as a barrier to changing practice. Childbearing women reported being fearful of accessing care at health services due to COVID-19, and whilst they appreciated the telehealth contacts, many continued to prefer face-to-face delivery of ANC and PNC care. Telehealth, however, was a good alternative in a time when face-to-face care was not possible. Considerations for post-pandemic broader implementation or scale-up of telehealth for routine antenatal and postnatal maternity care provision include the need for further research on issues such as accessibility, acceptability, quality of care, and sustainability of service provision.

6.
Child Neurol Open ; 10: 2329048X231169400, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306789

ABSTRACT

Social media has changed the way we communicate and interact. Unsurprisingly, it has also changed how we teach and learn. Younger generations of learners have transitioned from traditional educational sources to digital ones. Medical educators need to adapt to trends in medical education and develop fluency in the digital methods used by medical learners today. This is part two of a two-part series on social media and digital education in neurology. This article provides an overview of how social media can be used as a teaching tool in medical education and provides an overview in which it is grounded. We offer practical strategies on how social media can promote lifelong learning, educator development, educator support, and foster educator identity with accompanying neurology-specific examples. We also review considerations for incorporating social media into teaching and learning practices and future directions for integrating these tools in neurology education.

7.
The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension ; 29(2):173-197, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2293172

ABSTRACT

PurposeTo explore the perceived credibility, relevance, legitimacy and accessibility of videos and podcasts in farm extension.MethodsA two-phase mixed methods approach consisting of a pre-COVID online survey of farmers (n = 221), farmer telephone interviews (n = 60) and in-person focus groups of farmers (n = 4) followed by an analysis of how viewers interact with Agricology videos and podcasts, a further online survey (n = 141) and online farmer focus groups (n = 4) during the COVID-19 pandemic.FindingsIf they are to be perceived as effective extension methods, videos should be short, concise, practical, advert-free and visualise how to implement a practice. Podcasts can be longer, more detailed, and allow multitasking. Both should use farmer-friendly language, be easily accessible, high quality, non-biased, and be created by someone whom farmers respect.Practical implicationsHelps policy-makers and extensionists understand the potential of videos and podcasts and the trade-offs in using them with other forms of extension. The findings are also of use to global advisory services seeking to offer hybridised advice as a result of the ongoing COVID pandemic.Theoretical implicationsElucidates the trade-offs of using videos and podcasts when face-to-face extension is not possible and develops the CRELE framework.OriginalityDiscusses the role of podcasts in farm extension and re-evaluates the role of videos when face-to-face extension is impossible.

8.
Stigma and Health ; 8(1):12-20, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2281942

ABSTRACT

Media coverage of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has played a critical role throughout the pandemic: sharing news about the novel virus, policies and practices to mitigate it, and the race to create and distribute vaccines. The media coverage, however, has been critiqued as stigmatizing. Although this critique is not new, there is limited understanding of how and why new stigmas emerge from exposure to media coverage. Drawing upon the model of stigma communication (Smith et al., 2019) and the attribution model of stigma (Corrigan et al., 2003), we investigated a novel model of stigma emergence that delineates two kinds of longitudinal processes: (a) a message-effects process, in which exposure to mediated messages about COVID-19 leads to public stigma through danger appraisal and (b) a coping process in which stress and rumination shape later perceptions of public stigma. To test the model, we tracked an emerging COVID-19 stigma with a two-wave survey of a prospective, longitudinal cohort living in one county in a mid-Atlantic state (N = 883). The results supported this model. The longitudinal processes of stigma emergence and implications for COVID-19 stigma are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
JMIR Infodemiology ; 3: e38390, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284713

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has introduced yet another opportunity to web-based sellers of loosely regulated substances, such as cannabidiol (CBD), to promote sales under false pretenses of curing the disease. Therefore, it has become necessary to innovate ways to identify such instances of misinformation. Objective: We sought to identify COVID-19 misinformation as it relates to the sales or promotion of CBD and used transformer-based language models to identify tweets semantically similar to quotes taken from known instances of misinformation. In this case, the known misinformation was the publicly available Warning Letters from Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods: We collected tweets using CBD- and COVID-19-related terms. Using a previously trained model, we extracted the tweets indicating commercialization and sales of CBD and annotated those containing COVID-19 misinformation according to the FDA definitions. We encoded the collection of tweets and misinformation quotes into sentence vectors and then calculated the cosine similarity between each quote and each tweet. This allowed us to establish a threshold to identify tweets that were making false claims regarding CBD and COVID-19 while minimizing the instances of false positives. Results: We demonstrated that by using quotes taken from Warning Letters issued by FDA to perpetrators of similar misinformation, we can identify semantically similar tweets that also contain misinformation. This was accomplished by identifying a cosine distance threshold between the sentence vectors of the Warning Letters and tweets. Conclusions: This research shows that commercial CBD or COVID-19 misinformation can potentially be identified and curbed using transformer-based language models and known prior instances of misinformation. Our approach functions without the need for labeled data, potentially reducing the time at which misinformation can be identified. Our approach shows promise in that it is easily adapted to identify other forms of misinformation related to loosely regulated substances.

10.
J Gen Intern Med ; 38(Suppl 1): 33-37, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent USDA Economic Research Service Population Survey cites a stabilization of food insecurity overall in the USA between 2019 and 2020, but Black, Hispanic, and all households with children cited increases - underscoring that the COVID-19 pandemic caused severe disruptions to food insecurity for historically disenfranchised populations. AIM: Describe lessons learned, considerations, and recommendations from the experience of a community teaching kitchen (CTK) in addressing food insecurity and chronic disease management among patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. SETTING: The Providence CTK is co-located at Providence Milwaukie Hospital in Portland, Oregon. PARTICIPANTS: Providence CTK serves patients who report a higher prevalence of food insecurity and multiple chronic conditions. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Providence CTK has five components: chronic disease self-management education, culinary nutrition education, patient navigation, a medical referral-based food pantry (Family Market), and an immersive training environment. PROGRAM EVALUATION: CTK staff highlight that they provided food and education support when it was needed most, leveraged existing partnerships and staffing to sustain operations and Family Market accessibility, shifted delivery of educational services based-on billing and virtual service considerations, and repurposed roles to support evolving needs. DISCUSSION: The Providence CTK case study provides a blueprint for how healthcare organizations could design a model of culinary nutrition education that is immersive, empowering, and inclusive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Food Assistance , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Food Supply , Hospitals, Teaching
11.
Innov High Educ ; : 1-20, 2023 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281941

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic-related social distancing practices that colleges implemented in Spring 2020 disrupted the typical mechanisms of propinquity (physical proximity) and homophily (shared characteristics) that physical institutions rely on to help students build and maintain relationships critical to learning and wellbeing. To explore how social distancing shaped students' academic and social networks and associated educational outcomes, we conceptualized it as a "network shock" and collected unique ego network data in April 2020. For participating students, maintaining interactions with the same set of individuals before and after social distancing was related to more positive outcomes across a range of self-reported wellbeing and learning indicators. On average, students experienced a loss of frequent academic contacts, while they maintained or replaced social interactions in their interpersonal networks after social distancing. Our investigation of the ways students experienced changes in their social and academic networks after a loss of physical proximity points to the role of interpersonal interaction network continuity for fostering wellbeing and learning in times of disruption, as well as the potential need for support in maintaining or rebuilding academic networks.

12.
BMJ Case Rep ; 16(3)2023 Mar 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257436

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a unilateral extraocular muscle haematoma in an adult female patient who was compliant with life-long oral anticoagulation for recurrent deep vein thrombosis. The patient presented with symptoms of sudden-onset left-sided headache radiating to the temporal region, which started 2 days prior. No obvious triggering factors were identified. Cranial and ocular examinations were within normal limits. Imaging revealed a haemorrhage related to the lateral rectus muscle of the left eye. Conservative management was employed with abstinence from anticoagulation for 2 weeks and a weaning regime of oral steroids. Under the clinical review of ophthalmology and interval radiological monitoring, symptoms were reduced with reduction of haemorrhage size. Anticoagulation was reinstated after 2 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a non-traumatic extraocular muscle haematoma to be reported in a patient on anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
Conservative Treatment , Oculomotor Muscles , Adult , Female , Humans , Oculomotor Muscles/diagnostic imaging , Eye , Hematoma/chemically induced , Hematoma/diagnostic imaging , Anticoagulants/adverse effects
13.
J Rural Health ; 2022 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232368

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: With surging opioid-involved overdoses, maintaining access to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment is critical during the COVID-19 pandemic. We examined changes in transmucosal buprenorphine prescribing for OUD treatment in Kentucky after the national COVID-19 emergency declaration, with a focus on rural-urban differences. METHODS: Using 2019-2020 prescription monitoring data, we performed segmented regression analysis for an interrupted time series design to evaluate changes in weekly rates (per 100,000 residents) of dispensed prescriptions, unique individuals with dispensed prescriptions, and average days' supply for dispensed prescriptions of transmucosal buprenorphine. FINDINGS: The weekly rates of dispensed prescriptions and unique individuals with dispensed prescriptions were higher for rural residents than urban residents. After the national COVID-19 emergency declaration, rural and urban residents experienced similar immediate drops in the rate of dispensed prescriptions (rural -33.4; urban -24.3) and unique patients with dispensed prescriptions (rural -25.0; urban -17.1), followed by similar sustained increases. Both measures surpassed the prepandemic levels in mid-June 2020. Patients residing in urban areas received averagely longer prescriptions at baseline (urban: 11.0 days; rural: 10.5 days). The average weekly days' supply increased in the week after the national emergency declaration, but the estimated increase was higher (P = .004) for urban (0.8 days) versus rural (0.5 days) residents. CONCLUSIONS: Transmucosal buprenorphine utilization increased during the COVID-19 pandemic after experiencing interruption during the initial weeks of the pandemic. Future studies should evaluate the contribution of the relaxed telemedicine buprenorphine prescribing regulations during the COVID-19 national emergency on initiation and maintenance of buprenorphine treatment.

14.
Health Commun ; : 1-13, 2022 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151414

ABSTRACT

Novel, public behaviors, such as masking, should be susceptible to normative influence. This paper advances the theory of normative social behavior by considering a new set of moderators of normative influence - superdiffuser traits - and by clarifying the antecedents and consequences of exposure to collective norms. We use data from a two-wave survey of a cohort living in one U.S. county during the pandemic (N = 913) to assess normative effects on masking. We also used a bipartite network (based on people shopping for food in the same stores) to examine exposure to collective norms. The results show different superdiffuser traits have distinct effects on the relationship between perceived injunctive norms and masking intentions. Exposure to collective norms influences masking, but this influence depends on how people interact with their social environments. Network analysis shows that behavioral homophily is a significant predictor of selective exposure to collective norms earlier (but not later) in the pandemic. Implications for understanding normative influence in a context where opinion leadership matters are discussed.

15.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(13): S238-S243, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162892

ABSTRACT

In February 2021, Peru launched a COVID-19 vaccination campaign among healthcare personnel using an inactivated whole-virus vaccine. The manufacturer recommended 2 vaccine doses 21 days apart. We evaluated vaccine effectiveness among an existing multiyear influenza vaccine cohort at 2 hospitals in Lima. We analyzed data on 290 participants followed during February-May 2021. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and provided weekly self-collected nasal swab samples; samples were tested by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Median participant follow-up was 2 (range 1-11) weeks. We performed multivariable logistic regression and adjusted for preselected characteristics. During the study, 25 (9%) participants tested SARS-CoV-2-positive. We estimated adjusted vaccine effectiveness at 95% (95% CI 70%-99%) among fully vaccinated participants and 100% (95% CI 88%-100%) among partially vaccinated participants. These data can inform the use and acceptance of inactivated whole-virus vaccine and support vaccination efforts in the region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Vaccination , Delivery of Health Care
16.
American Behavioral Scientist ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2053550

ABSTRACT

Message fatigue is the aversive motivational state that results from excessive exposure to campaign messages or similar information over an extended period of time. When fatigued, individuals become less attentive, less responsive, and more resistant to campaign messages and related information. Thus, understanding the bases and functioning of fatigue in persuasive health campaigns has obvious value. Despite considerable interest in this important topic, major questions remain under-studied. One such question hinges on the observation that campaigns are implemented in social systems, not laboratories. Apart from any direct effects that a campaign might produce, there is the potential for secondary exposure via individuals or other media that can yield distinct influences. How do these multiple sources work together to influence fatigue? Second, as explicated, message fatigue is the consequence of repeated exposure to campaign messages over time. With few exceptions, however, fatigue research has employed only cross-sectional designs, which preclude conclusions about the dynamic behavior of fatigue. How does fatigue change over the course of a campaign? Finally, the bases of fatigue are not entirely clear. Whereas fatigue is defined as a subjective judgment of excessive exposure, little is known about the affective processes underlying that judgment. How do emotional responses to a campaign amplify or attenuate fatigue? We examined these questions in the context of a campus COVID-19 safety behaviors campaign. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of American Behavioral Scientist is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Am J Health Behav ; 46(4): 467-476, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040335

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This mixed-methods study compared perspectives of those 'very likely' versus 'very unlikely' to receive a hypothetical COVID-19 vaccine. Methods: We used an explanatory, sequential, mixed- methods design to analyze quantitative data from a rural Pennsylvania sample. Of the 976 participants, 67 selected 'very unlikely' to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Responses to open-ended questions: "What worries you the most about the COVID 19 pandemic?" and "What are your thoughts about a potential COVID 19 vaccine?" were qualitatively compared to answers from the 67 participants who selected 'very likely' to get the COVID-19 vaccine. We used descriptive content analysis to compare themes across the 2 groups. Results: Both groups had thematic commonalities related to their concerns. Themes that were more common among those 'very unlikely' to get vaccinated included concern for politics overriding vaccine safety and rushed vaccine development timeline, whereas themes related to hope and optimism about vaccination were exclusive to the 'very likely' group. Conclusions: Shared beliefs existed across groups with different intents to vaccinate; yet, identification with vaccine spokespersons differed. Messaging campaigns can use these commonalities to address vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Politics , Vaccination
18.
American Behavioral Scientist ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2020673

ABSTRACT

Since Spring 2020, college students have experienced rapid and unpredictable shifts in their social and academic worlds. As institutions implemented social distancing policies, students had to navigate unstable norms related to peer interaction while negotiating what it meant to act responsibly to ensure their own safety and help their communities. Drawing on a network-based approach to pro-social behavior, we conducted a study of undergraduate students' frequent interaction networks at one research university during Fall 2020 to better understand how students constructed and were influenced by their peer relationship patterns. We observed a typology of student relationship patterns based on the structure and physical location of relationships. This typology had important implications for how students assessed risk and expressed care. While students engaged in different behaviors related to social distancing, they all believed they were making a concerted effort to keep their frequent contacts safe.

19.
J Health Commun ; 27(6): 375-381, 2022 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996985

ABSTRACT

We sought to identify barriers to COVID-19 vaccine uptake among persons who are socially vulnerable in light of the natural cycle of innovation diffusion. Widespread adoption of a health innovation requires a cadre of opinion leaders to build on successes experienced by early adopters. One type of opinion leader in healthcare are health mavens: members of a community who maintain up-to-date health knowledge and share their knowledge others. We surveyed 139 persons who are socially vulnerable regarding their COVID-19 vaccination intention, and evaluated their responses based on psychological traits captured by two scales: innovativeness and health mavenism. Health mavenism was not strongly correlated with COVID-19 vaccine intention. Health mavens often relied on their own healthcare providers (n = 46) and health agency websites (n = 42) for vaccine information. Those who relied on their faith leaders (n = 4) reported a lower likelihood of getting vaccinated (31.5% vs. 76.0%, p < .05). The observed lack of support by health mavens represents a critical barrier to COVID-19 vaccine uptake; targeting campaigns to health mavens may increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake in socially vulnerable communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Diffusion of Innovation
20.
Prev Med Rep ; 29: 101889, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983823

ABSTRACT

We seek to quantify the relationship between health behaviors and work-related experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic by predicting health behaviors as a function of essential worker status, job loss, change in work hours, and COVID-19 experiences. We use multivariate models and survey data from 913 employed adults in a semi-rural mid-Atlantic US county, and test whether essential worker results vary by gender, parenthood, and/or university employment. Multivariate models indicate that essential workers used tobacco on more days (4.5; p <.01) and were less likely to sleep 8 h (odds ratio [OR] 0.6; p <.01) than non-essential workers. The risk of sleeping less than 8 h is concentrated among essential workers in the service industry (OR 0.5; p <.05) and non-parents (OR 0.5; p <.05). Feminine essential workers exercised on fewer days (-0.8; p <.05) than feminine non-essential workers. Workers with reduced work hours consumed more alcoholic drinks (0.3; p <.05), while workers with increased work hours consumed alcohol (0.3; p <.05) and exercised (0.6; p <.05) on more days. Essential worker status and changes in work hours are correlated with unhealthy behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL