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1.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327526

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The ability to distinguish between SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) is of ongoing interest due to differences in transmissibility, response to vaccination, clinical prognosis, and therapy. Although detailed genetic characterization requires whole-genome sequencing (WGS), targeted nucleic acid amplification tests can serve a complementary role in clinical settings, as they are more rapid and accessible than sequencing in most laboratories. We designed and analytically validated a two-reaction multiplex reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay targeting spike protein mutations L452R, E484K, and N501Y in Reaction 1, and del69-70, K417N, and T478K in Reaction 2. This assay had 95-100% agreement with WGS in 502 upper respiratory swabs collected between April 26 and August 1, 2021, consisting of 43 Alpha, 2 Beta, 20 Gamma, 378 Delta, and 59 non-VOC infections. Validation in a separate group of 230 WGS-confirmed Omicron variant samples collected in December 2021 and January 2022 demonstrated 100% agreement. This RT-qPCR-based approach can be implemented in clinical laboratories already performing SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid amplification tests to assist in local epidemiological surveillance and clinical decision-making.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313371

ABSTRACT

Background: Prolonged symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection are well-documented. However, which factors influence development of long-term symptoms, how symptoms vary across ethnic groups, and whether long-term symptoms correlate with serologic biomarkers remain elusive. Methods: Adult inpatient and outpatient SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR positive patients were recruited at Stanford from March 2020 to February 2021. Study participants were seen for in-person visits at diagnosis and every 1-3 months for up to one year after diagnosis;they completed symptom surveys and underwent sampling procedures (blood draw and nasal swab) at each visit. Findings: Our cohort (n=617) ranged from asymptomatic to critical COVID-19 infections. 40% of participants reported at least one symptom associated with COVID-19 six months after diagnosis. Median time from diagnosis to first resolution of all symptoms was 44 days, median time from diagnosis to sustained symptom resolution with no recurring symptoms for one month or longer was 214 days. Serum anti-nucleocapsid IgG level in the first week of infection was predictive of time to symptom resolution. A prior diagnosis of lung disease was associated with longer time to symptom resolution. COVID-19 disease severity, ethnicity, sex, cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositivity, and remdesivir use did not affect time to sustained symptom resolution. More than 90% of participants had SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody>1000 AU/mL nine months after diagnosis. Interpretation: Our findings showed that all disease severities had a similar risk of developing post-COVID-19 syndrome in an ethnically diverse population. Comorbid lung disease and lower levels of initial IgG response to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antigen were associated with longer symptom duration. Trial Registration: National clinical trial database NCT04664309.Funding: NIH CTSA grant, U54 NIH Grant, R21 NIEHS, Sean N Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University, the Sunshine Foundation, the Crown Foundation, and the Parker Foundation.Declaration of Interest: Dr. Boyd received support for the current manuscript from Meso Scale Discovery and NIH;418 received consulting fees by Regeneron for expert testimony, has stocks or stock options in 419 AbCellera Biologics;Dr. Chinthrajah reports grants from NIAID, CoFAR, Aimmune, DBV 420 Technologies, Astellas, Regeneron, Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute 421 (MCHRI), and FARE. She is an Advisory Board Member at Alladapt Therapeutics, Novartis, 422 Genentech, Sanofi, Allergenis, and Nutricia;Dr. Manisha Desai received support from Chan 423 Zuckerberg Foundation;Dr. Maecker received grants or contracts from NIH, Bill & Melinda 424 Gates Foundation, Ionis Corporation, Amgen Corporation;Consulting fees from Magarray Corp;425 payment or honoraria from UCLA, UC Davis;leadership or fiduciary role at Cytek SAB;stocks 426 or stock options at BD Biosciences;Dr. Nadeau reports grants from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE);Director of World Allergy Organization (WAO) , Advisor at Cour Pharma, Consultant for Excellergy, Red tree ventures, and Phylaxis, Co-founder of Before Brands, Alladapt, Latitude, and IgGenix;and National Scientific Committee member at Immune Tolerance Network (ITN), and National Institutes of Health (NIH) clinical research centers, outside the submitted work;patents include, “Mixed allergen composition and methods for using the same”, “Granulocyte-based methods for detecting and monitoring immune system disorders”, “Methods and Assays for Detecting and Quantifying Pure Subpopulations of White Blood Cells in Immune System Disorders,” and “Methods of isolating allergen-specific antibodies from humans and uses thereof”;Dr. Benjamin Pinsky received grants or contracts for the present manuscript from MesoScale Diagno tics;Dr. Angele Rogers was a Clinical Trials Advisory Board Member for Merck;Dr. Sindher reports support for the present manuscript from the NIH, Regeneron, DBV Technologies, Aimmune, Novartis, CoFAR, FARE, participated on a DSMB for Astra Zeneca, DBV, and received payment or honorarium from FARE;Neera Ahuja, Maja Artandi, Linda Barman, Catherine Blish, Andra Blomkalns, William Collins, MacKenzie Cox, Linda Geng, Xiaolin Jia, Megan Mahoney, Monali Manohar, Ruth O’hara, Rajan Puri, Katharina Roltgen, Laura Vaughan, Samuel Yang, Shu Cao, Iris Chang, Hena Din, Evan Do, Andrea Fernandez, Alexandra Lee, Natasha Purington, Yael Rosenberg-Hasson, Theo Snow, Daniel Solis, Michelle Verghese, and Yingjie Weng have no conflict of interest.Ethical Approval: This study was reviewed and approved by the Stanford Administrative Panel on Human Subjects in Medical Research.

4.
Cell ; 185(6): 1025-1040.e14, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649487

ABSTRACT

During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, novel and traditional vaccine strategies have been deployed globally. We investigated whether antibodies stimulated by mRNA vaccination (BNT162b2), including third-dose boosting, differ from those generated by infection or adenoviral (ChAdOx1-S and Gam-COVID-Vac) or inactivated viral (BBIBP-CorV) vaccines. We analyzed human lymph nodes after infection or mRNA vaccination for correlates of serological differences. Antibody breadth against viral variants is lower after infection compared with all vaccines evaluated but improves over several months. Viral variant infection elicits variant-specific antibodies, but prior mRNA vaccination imprints serological responses toward Wuhan-Hu-1 rather than variant antigens. In contrast to disrupted germinal centers (GCs) in lymph nodes during infection, mRNA vaccination stimulates robust GCs containing vaccine mRNA and spike antigen up to 8 weeks postvaccination in some cases. SARS-CoV-2 antibody specificity, breadth, and maturation are affected by imprinting from exposure history and distinct histological and antigenic contexts in infection compared with vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Germinal Center , Humans , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(12): 1738-1743.e4, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574127

ABSTRACT

Different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are approved in various countries, but few direct comparisons of the antibody responses they stimulate have been reported. We collected plasma specimens in July 2021 from 196 Mongolian participants fully vaccinated with one of four COVID-19 vaccines: Pfizer/BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Sputnik V, and Sinopharm. Functional antibody testing with a panel of nine SARS-CoV-2 viral variant receptor binding domain (RBD) proteins revealed marked differences in vaccine responses, with low antibody levels and RBD-ACE2 blocking activity stimulated by the Sinopharm and Sputnik V vaccines in comparison to the AstraZeneca or Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines. The Alpha variant caused 97% of infections in Mongolia in June and early July 2021. Individuals who recover from SARS-CoV-2 infection after vaccination achieve high antibody titers in most cases. These data suggest that public health interventions such as vaccine boosting, potentially with more potent vaccine types, may be needed to control COVID-19 in Mongolia and worldwide.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mass Vaccination , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Immune Sera/chemistry , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Middle Aged , Mongolia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
J Clin Microbiol ; 59(8): e0085921, 2021 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494947

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants with concerning phenotypic mutations is of public health interest. Genomic surveillance is an important tool for a pandemic response, but many laboratories do not have the resources to support population-level sequencing. We hypothesized that a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) to genotype mutations in the viral spike protein could facilitate high-throughput variant surveillance. We designed and analytically validated a one-step multiplex allele-specific reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) to detect three nonsynonymous spike protein mutations (L452R, E484K, N501Y). Assay specificity was validated with next-generation whole-genome sequencing. We then screened a large cohort of SARS-CoV-2-positive specimens from our San Francisco Bay Area population. Between 1 December 2020 and 1 March 2021, we screened 4,049 unique infections by genotyping RT-qPCR, with an assay failure rate of 2.8%. We detected 1,567 L452R mutations (38.7%), 34 N501Y mutations (0.84%), 22 E484K mutations (0.54%), and 3 (0.07%) E484K plus N501Y mutations. The assay had perfect (100%) concordance with whole-genome sequencing of a validation subset of 229 specimens and detected B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.427, B.1.429, B.1.526, and P.2 variants, among others. The assay revealed the rapid emergence of the L452R variant in our population, with a prevalence of 24.8% in December 2020 that increased to 62.5% in March 2021. We developed and clinically implemented a genotyping RT-qPCR to conduct high-throughput SARS-CoV-2 variant screening. This approach can be adapted for emerging mutations and immediately implemented in laboratories already performing NAAT worldwide using existing equipment, personnel, and extracted nucleic acid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Epidemiological Monitoring , Genotype , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
7.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(10): 2720-2723, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486743

ABSTRACT

We report persistent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in a patient with HIV/AIDS; the virus developed spike N terminal domain and receptor binding domain neutralization resistance mutations. Our findings suggest that immunocompromised patients can harbor emerging variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
8.
Clin Chem ; 68(1): 204-213, 2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450383

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleocapsid antigen in blood has been described, but the diagnostic and prognostic role of antigenemia is not well understood. This study aimed to determine the frequency, duration, and concentration of nucleocapsid antigen in plasma and its association with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity. METHODS: We utilized an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunoassay targeting SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antigen to evaluate 777 plasma samples from 104 individuals with COVID-19. We compared plasma antigen to respiratory nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) in 74 individuals with COVID-19 from samples collected ±1 day of diagnostic respiratory NAAT and in 52 SARS-CoV-2-negative individuals. We used Kruskal-Wallis tests, multivariable logistic regression, and mixed-effects modeling to evaluate whether plasma antigen concentration was associated with disease severity. RESULTS: Plasma antigen had 91.9% (95% CI 83.2%-97.0%) clinical sensitivity and 94.2% (84.1%-98.8%) clinical specificity. Antigen-negative plasma samples belonged to patients with later respiratory cycle thresholds (Ct) when compared with antigen-positive plasma samples. Median plasma antigen concentration (log10 fg/mL) was 5.4 (interquartile range 3.9-6.0) in outpatients, 6.0 (5.4-6.5) in inpatients, and 6.6 (6.1-7.2) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In models adjusted for age, sex, diabetes, and hypertension, plasma antigen concentration at diagnosis was associated with ICU admission [odds ratio 2.8 (95% CI 1.2-6.2), P=.01] but not with non-ICU hospitalization. Rate of antigen decrease was not associated with disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 plasma nucleocapsid antigen exhibited comparable diagnostic performance to upper respiratory NAAT, especially among those with late respiratory Ct. In addition to currently available tools, antigenemia may facilitate patient triage to optimize intensive care utilization.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electrochemical Techniques , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunoassay , Luminescent Measurements , Nucleocapsid , Phosphoproteins/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
9.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(4): 115517, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347571

ABSTRACT

Dengue and COVID-19 cocirculation presents a diagnostic conundrum for physicians evaluating patients with acute febrile illnesses, both in endemic regions and among returning travelers. We present a case of a returning traveler from Pakistan who, following repeated negative SARS-CoV-2 tests, was found to have a Dengue virus serotype 2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Dengue/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue Virus/classification , Dengue Virus/genetics , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Pakistan/epidemiology , Phylogeny , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Serogroup , Travel
10.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(10): 2720-2723, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323073

ABSTRACT

We report persistent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in a patient with HIV/AIDS; the virus developed spike N terminal domain and receptor binding domain neutralization resistance mutations. Our findings suggest that immunocompromised patients can harbor emerging variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
11.
J Clin Microbiol ; 59(8): e0085921, 2021 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316925

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants with concerning phenotypic mutations is of public health interest. Genomic surveillance is an important tool for a pandemic response, but many laboratories do not have the resources to support population-level sequencing. We hypothesized that a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) to genotype mutations in the viral spike protein could facilitate high-throughput variant surveillance. We designed and analytically validated a one-step multiplex allele-specific reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) to detect three nonsynonymous spike protein mutations (L452R, E484K, N501Y). Assay specificity was validated with next-generation whole-genome sequencing. We then screened a large cohort of SARS-CoV-2-positive specimens from our San Francisco Bay Area population. Between 1 December 2020 and 1 March 2021, we screened 4,049 unique infections by genotyping RT-qPCR, with an assay failure rate of 2.8%. We detected 1,567 L452R mutations (38.7%), 34 N501Y mutations (0.84%), 22 E484K mutations (0.54%), and 3 (0.07%) E484K plus N501Y mutations. The assay had perfect (100%) concordance with whole-genome sequencing of a validation subset of 229 specimens and detected B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.427, B.1.429, B.1.526, and P.2 variants, among others. The assay revealed the rapid emergence of the L452R variant in our population, with a prevalence of 24.8% in December 2020 that increased to 62.5% in March 2021. We developed and clinically implemented a genotyping RT-qPCR to conduct high-throughput SARS-CoV-2 variant screening. This approach can be adapted for emerging mutations and immediately implemented in laboratories already performing NAAT worldwide using existing equipment, personnel, and extracted nucleic acid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Epidemiological Monitoring , Genotype , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(12): 2326-2328, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172645

ABSTRACT

An ultra-sensitive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleocapsid antigen assay (S-PLEX, MesoScale Diagnostics) was evaluated in 250 retrospective and 200 prospective upper respiratory specimens. In samples with cycle threshold <35, there was 95%-98% positive and 93%-96% negative percent agreement with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. S-PLEX may provide a high-throughput alternative to nucleic acid-based testing for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Immunologic Tests , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
14.
J Clin Virol ; 139: 104818, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) endgame may benefit from simple, accurate antibody testing to characterize seroprevalence and immunization coverage. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of the lateral flow QIAreach anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total rapid nanoparticle fluorescence immunoassay compared to reference isotype-specific IgG, IgM, and IgA SARS-CoV-2 ELISA using S1 or receptor binding domain (RBD) as antigens. STUDY DESIGN: A diagnostic comparison study was carried out using 154 well-characterized heparin plasma samples. Agreement between assays was assessed by overall, positive, and negative percent agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient. RESULTS: Overall agreement between the QIAreach anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total and any anti-spike domain (S1 or RBD) antibody isotype was 96.0 % (95 % CI 89.8-98.8), the positive percent agreement was 97.6 % (95 % CI 91.0-99.9), the negative percent agreement was 88.2 % (95 % CI 64.4-98.0). The kappa coefficient was 0.86 (95 % CI 0.72 to 0.99). CONCLUSION: The QIAreach anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total rapid antibody test provides comparable performance to high-complexity, laboratory-based ELISA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Fluorescent Antibody Technique/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nanoparticles
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