Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 439, 2022 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910287

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since COVID-19 broke out worldwide, it had caused extensive public health concerns and psychological distress, including PTSD and stigmatization towards recovered patients and people from high-risk areas. However, the association between PTSD, stigmatization and certain related factors have not been confirmed. METHODS: Through cluster random sampling, 946 Chinese graduates were investigated from 5 universities in Shanghai at three months after China lifted its coronavirus lockdown. PTSD symptoms were evaluated with PCL-5. Demographic and disease-related characteristics including stigmatization, educational attainment and working position were collected to assess their association with PTSD. RESULTS: 12.4% graduates were reported significant PTSD symptoms in PCL-5 screening with a cut-off of 33. Graduates with a Master's degree (P = 0.02) or working position like "looking for a job" and "planning to go abroad" (P = 0.038) showed severer stigmatization related to COVID-19. Stigmatization towards both patients recovering from COVID-19 and people from high-risk areas had significant association with PTSD symptoms. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that stigmatization can explain 5% of variation of PCL-5 scores after controlling gender, age, educational attainments and working position. CONCLUSION: Graduates who were looking for jobs or preparing to go abroad showed more stigmatization related to COVID-19. There was a positive correlation between stigma against COVID-19 and PTSD symptoms. More attention should be paid to the mental health status of graduates who are preparing to go abroad or looking for jobs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , China , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Stereotyping , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329581

ABSTRACT

Emerging in December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) eventually became a pandemic and has posed a tremendous threat to global public health. However, the origins of SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, remain to be determined. It has reported that a certain number of the early case clusters had a contact history with Huanan Seafood Market. Therefore, surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 within the market is of vital importance. Herein, we presented the SARS-CoV-2 detection results of 1380 samples collected from the environment and the animals within the market in early 2020. By SARS-CoV-2-specific RT-qPCR, 73 environmental samples tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and three live viruses were successfully isolated. The viruses from the market shared nucleotide identity of 99.980% to 99.993% with the human isolate HCoV/Wuhan/IVDC-HB-01. In contrast, no virus was detected in the animal swabs covering 18 species of animals in the market. The SARS-COV-2 nucleic acids in the positive environmental samples showed significant correlation of abundance of Homo sapiens with SARS-CoV-2. In summary, this study provided convincing evidence of the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in the Huanan Seafood Market during the early stage of COVID-19 outbreak.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324114

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of corticosteroid therapy on outcomes of patients with Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is highly controversial. We aimed to compare the risk of death between COVID-19-related ARDS patients with corticosteroid treatment and those without. Methods In this single-centre retrospective observational study, patients with ARDS caused by COVID-19 between 24 December 2019 and 24 February 2020 were enrolled. The primary outcome was 60-day in-hospital death. The exposure was prescribed systemic corticosteroids or not. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 60-day in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 382 patients including 226 (59.2%) patients who received systemic corticosteroids and 156 (40.8%) patients with standard treatment were analyzed. The maximum dose of corticosteroids was 80.0 (IQR 40.0–80.0) mg equivalent methylprednisolone per day, and duration of corticosteroid treatment was 7.0 (4.0–12.0) days in total. In Cox regression analysis using corticosteroid treatment as a time-varying variable, corticosteroid treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of in-hospital death within 60 days (HR, 0.48;95% CI, 0.25, 0.93;p  = 0.0285). The association remained significantly after adjusting for age, sex, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at hospital admission, propensity score of corticosteroid treatment, and comorbidities (HR: 0.51;CI: 0.27, 0.99;p  = 0.0471). Corticosteroids were not associated with delayed viral RNA clearance in our cohort. Conclusion In this clinical practice setting, low-to-moderate dose corticosteroid treatment was associated with reduced risk of death in COVID-19 patients who developed ARDS.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318906

ABSTRACT

Background: Solid transplant patients are susceptible to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). While the vast majority of PJP cases occur within the first 6 months after transplantation, very few PJP cases are seen beyond 1 year post transplantation (late-onset PJP). PJP and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19, caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2) share quite a few common clinical manifestations and imaging findings, making the diagnosis of PJP often underappreciated during the current COVID-19 pandemic. To date, only 1 case of kidney transplantation who developed COVID-19 and late-onset PJP has been reported, but this patient also suffered from many other infections and died from respiratory failure and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A successful treatment of kidney patients with COVID-19 and late-onset PJP has not been reported. Case presentation: We present a case of a 55-year-old male kidney transplant patient with COVID-19 who also developed late-onset PJP. He received a combined strategy, including specific anti-pneumocystis therapy, symptomatic supportive therapy, adjusted immunosuppressive therapy, and use of antiviral/antibiotics drugs, ending with a favorable outcome. Conclusions: This case highlights the importance of prompt and differential diagnosis of PJP in kidney transplant patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further studies are required to clarify if kidney transplant patients with COVID-19 could be prone to develop late-onset PJP and how these patients should be treated.

5.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 83, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Solid transplant patients are susceptible to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). While the vast majority of PJP cases occur within the first 6 months after transplantation, very few PJP cases are seen beyond 1 year post-transplantation (late-onset PJP). PJP and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19, caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2) share quite a few common clinical manifestations and imaging findings, making the diagnosis of PJP often underappreciated during the current COVID-19 pandemic. To date, only 1 case of kidney transplantation who developed COVID-19 and late-onset PJP has been reported, but this patient also suffered from many other infections and died from respiratory failure and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A successful treatment of kidney patients with COVID-19 and late-onset PJP has not been reported. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 55-year-old male kidney transplant patient with COVID-19 who also developed late-onset PJP. He received a combined treatment strategy, including specific anti-pneumocystis therapy, symptomatic supportive therapy, adjusted immunosuppressive therapy, and use of antiviral drugs/antibiotics, ending with a favorable outcome. CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the importance of prompt and differential diagnosis of PJP in kidney transplant patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further studies are required to clarify if kidney transplant patients with COVID-19 could be prone to develop late-onset PJP and how these patients should be treated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/drug therapy
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296269

ABSTRACT

By largely unknown mechanisms, dysregulated gene-specific translation directly contributes to chronic inflammation-associated diseases such as sepsis and ARDS. Here, we report that G9a, a histone methyltransferase and well-regarded transcriptional repressor, non-canonically or non-epigenetically activates translation of select antimicrobial genes to promote proliferation of cytokine producing macrophages and to impair T cell function;all hallmarks of endotoxin-tolerance related complications including sepsis, ARDS and COVID19. Mechanistically, G9a interacts with translation regulators including METTL3, an N6-methyladenosine or m6A RNA methyltransferase, and methylates it to cooperatively upregulate the translation of certain m6A-modified mRNAs that encode immune checkpoint and anti-inflammatory proteins. Further, translatome proteomic analysis of ET macrophages progressively treated by a G9a inhibitor identified proteins showing G9a-dependent translation that unite the networks associated with hyperinflammation and T cell dysfunction. Overall, we identified a previously unrecognized function of G9a in gene-specific translation that can be leveraged to treat ET-related chronic inflammatory diseases.

7.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 643, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of corticosteroid therapy on outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is highly controversial. We aimed to compare the risk of death between COVID-19-related ARDS patients with corticosteroid treatment and those without. METHODS: In this single-center retrospective observational study, patients with ARDS caused by COVID-19 between January 20, 2020, and February 24, 2020, were enrolled. The primary outcome was 60-day in-hospital death. The exposure was prescribed systemic corticosteroids or not. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 60-day in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: A total of 382 patients [60.7 ± 14.1 years old (mean ± SD), 61.3% males] were analyzed. The median of sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 2.0 (IQR 2.0-3.0). Of these cases, 94 (24.6%) patients had invasive mechanical ventilation. The number of patients received systemic corticosteroids was 226 (59.2%), and 156 (40.8%) received standard treatment. The maximum dose of corticosteroids was 80.0 (IQR 40.0-80.0) mg equivalent methylprednisolone per day, and duration of corticosteroid treatment was 7.0 (4.0-12.0) days in total. In Cox regression analysis using corticosteroid treatment as a time-varying variable, corticosteroid treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of in-hospital death within 60 days after adjusting for age, sex, SOFA score at hospital admission, propensity score of corticosteroid treatment, comorbidities, antiviral treatment, and respiratory supports (HR 0.42; 95% CI 0.21, 0.85; p = 0.0160). Corticosteroids were not associated with delayed viral RNA clearance in our cohort. CONCLUSION: In this clinical practice setting, low-dose corticosteroid treatment was associated with reduced risk of in-hospital death within 60 days in COVID-19 patients who developed ARDS.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Propensity Score , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Aged , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends
8.
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care ; 8(2)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-936897

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To investigate the risk factors for the death in patients with COVID-19 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled inpatients with COVID-19 from Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital (Wuhan, China) between December 25, 2019, and March 3, 2020. The epidemiological and clinical data were compared between non-T2DM and T2DM or between survivors and non-survivors. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to explore the effect of T2DM and complications on in-hospital death. RESULTS: A total of 1105 inpatients with COVID-19, 967 subjects with without T2DM (n=522 male, 54.0%) and 138 subjects with pre-existing T2DM (n=82 male, 59.4%) were included for baseline characteristics analyses. The complications were also markedly increased in patients with pre-existing T2DM, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (48.6% vs 32.3%, p<0.001), acute cardiac injury (ACI) (36.2% vs 16.7%, p<0.001), acute kidney injury (AKI) (24.8% vs 9.5%, p<0.001), coagulopathy (24.8% vs 11.1%, p<0.001), and hypoproteinemia (21.2% vs 9.4%, p<0.001). The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with pre-existing T2DM compared with those without T2DM (35.3% vs 17.4%, p<0.001). Moreover, in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 with T2DM, ARDS and coagulopathy were the main causes of mortality, with an HR of 7.96 (95% CI 2.25 to 28.24, p=0.001) for ARDS and an HR of 2.37 (95% CI 1.08 to 5.21, p=0.032) for coagulopathy. This was different from inpatients with COVID-19 without T2DM, in whom ARDS and cardiac injury were the main causes of mortality, with an HR of 12.18 (95% CI 5.74 to 25.89, p<0.001) for ARDS and an HR of 4.42 (95% CI 2.73 to 7.15, p<0.001) for cardiac injury. CONCLUSIONS: Coagulopathy was a major extrapulmonary risk factor for death in inpatients with COVID-19 with T2DM rather than ACI and AKI, which were well associated with mortality in inpatients with COVID-19 without T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Injuries/complications , Heart Injuries/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
9.
Clin Respir J ; 15(3): 293-309, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916058

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has spread rapidly worldwide and has been declared a pandemic. OBJECTIVES: To delineate clinical features of COVID-19 patients with different severities and prognoses and clarify the risk factors for disease progression and death at an early stage. METHODS: Medical history, laboratory findings, treatment and outcome data from 214 hospitalised patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Eastern Campus of Renmin Hospital, Wuhan University in China were collected from 30 January 2020 to 20 February 2020, and risk factors associated with clinical deterioration and death were analysed. The final date of follow-up was 21 March 2020. RESULTS: Age, comorbidities, higher neutrophil cell counts, lower lymphocyte counts and subsets, impairment of liver, renal, heart, coagulation systems, systematic inflammation and clinical scores at admission were significantly associated with disease severity. Ten (16.1%) moderate and 45 (47.9%) severe patients experienced deterioration after admission, and median time from illness onset to clinical deterioration was 14.7 (IQR 11.3-18.5) and 14.5 days (IQR 11.8-20.0), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed increased Hazards Ratio of disease progression associated with older age, lymphocyte count <1.1 × 109/L, blood urea nitrogen (BUN)> 9.5 mmol/L, lactate dehydrogenase >250 U/L and procalcitonin >0.1 ng/mL at admission. These factors were also associated with the risk of death except for BUN. Prediction models in terms of nomogram for clinical deterioration and death were established to illustrate the probability. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide insights for early detection and management of patients at risk of disease progression or even death, especially older patients and those with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate/trends
10.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 549860, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-845598

ABSTRACT

One of the primary tools for diagnosing COVID-19 is the nucleic acid-based real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test performed on respiratory specimens. The detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 in lower respiratory specimens (such as sputum) is higher than that for upper respiratory specimens (such as nasal and pharyngeal swabs). However, sputum specimens are usually quite viscous, requiring a homogenization process prior to nucleic acid (NA) extraction for RT-PCR. Sputum specimens from COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients were treated with four commonly used reagents-saline, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC), proteinase K (PK), and dithiothreitol (DTT), prior to NA extraction. These reagents were then compared for their performance in diagnosing COVID-19 in real clinical practice. The detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 in PK- or DTT-treated sputum was comparable, and higher than that in sputum treated with NALC or saline. While there was a 4.8% (1/21) false negative rate for the PK- and DTT-treated sputum, neither treatment showed any false positive cases among patients with non-COVID diseases. Moreover, sputum pretreated with saline, NALC, PK or DTT showed higher detection rates of SARS-CoV-2 as compared to pharyngeal swabs. Taken together, we provide direct evidence recommending the use of PK or DTT to pretreat sputum samples to facilitate SARS-CoV-2 detection by clinical laboratories. Moreover, our methods should help to standardize the procedure of processing sputum specimens and improve the ability to detect SARS-CoV-2 in these samples.

11.
Heart Fail Rev ; 26(5): 1249-1258, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-88492

ABSTRACT

Heart failure (HF) is a growing epidemic with high morbidity and mortality at an international scale. The apelin-APJ receptor pathway has been implicated in HF, making it a promising therapeutic target. APJ has been shown to be activated by a novel endogenous peptide ligand known as Elabela (ELA, also called Toddler or Apela), with a critical role in cardiac development and function. Activation of the ELA-APJ receptor axis exerts a wide range of physiological effects, including depressor response, positive inotropic action, diuresis, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-remodeling, leading to its cardiovascular protection. The ELA-APJ axis is essential for diverse biological processes and has been shown to regulate fluid homeostasis, myocardial contractility, vasodilation, angiogenesis, cellular differentiation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, cardiorenal fibrosis, and dysfunction. The beneficial effects of the ELA-APJ receptor system are well-established by treating hypertension, myocardial infarction, and HF. Additionally, administration of ELA protects human embryonic stem cells against apoptosis and stress-induced cell death and promotes survival and self-renewal in an APJ-independent manner (X receptor) via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, which may provide a new therapeutic approach for HF. Thus, targeting the ELA-APJ axis has emerged as a pre-warning biomarker and a novel therapeutic approach against progression of HF. An increased understanding of cardiovascular actions of ELA will help to develop effective interventions. This article gives an overview of the characteristics of the ELA-apelin-APJ axis and summarizes the current knowledge on its cardioprotective roles, potential mechanisms, and prospective application for acute and chronic HF.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Hypertension , Peptide Hormones , Apelin , Apelin Receptors , Humans , Myocardium
12.
JAMA Intern Med ; 180(7): 934-943, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-8523

ABSTRACT

Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that was first reported in Wuhan, China, and has subsequently spread worldwide. Risk factors for the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 pneumonia have not yet been well delineated. Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or died. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of 201 patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital in China between December 25, 2019, and January 26, 2020. The final date of follow-up was February 13, 2020. Exposures: Confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. Main Outcomes and Measures: The development of ARDS and death. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory, management, treatment, and outcome data were also collected and analyzed. Results: Of 201 patients, the median age was 51 years (interquartile range, 43-60 years), and 128 (63.7%) patients were men. Eighty-four patients (41.8%) developed ARDS, and of those 84 patients, 44 (52.4%) died. In those who developed ARDS, compared with those who did not, more patients presented with dyspnea (50 of 84 [59.5%] patients and 30 of 117 [25.6%] patients, respectively [difference, 33.9%; 95% CI, 19.7%-48.1%]) and had comorbidities such as hypertension (23 of 84 [27.4%] patients and 16 of 117 [13.7%] patients, respectively [difference, 13.7%; 95% CI, 1.3%-26.1%]) and diabetes (16 of 84 [19.0%] patients and 6 of 117 [5.1%] patients, respectively [difference, 13.9%; 95% CI, 3.6%-24.2%]). In bivariate Cox regression analysis, risk factors associated with the development of ARDS and progression from ARDS to death included older age (hazard ratio [HR], 3.26; 95% CI 2.08-5.11; and HR, 6.17; 95% CI, 3.26-11.67, respectively), neutrophilia (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.09-1.19; and HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17, respectively), and organ and coagulation dysfunction (eg, higher lactate dehydrogenase [HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.44-1.79; and HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.11-1.52, respectively] and D-dimer [HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; and HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04, respectively]). High fever (≥39 °C) was associated with higher likelihood of ARDS development (HR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.11-2.84) and lower likelihood of death (HR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82). Among patients with ARDS, treatment with methylprednisolone decreased the risk of death (HR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.20-0.72). Conclusions and Relevance: Older age was associated with greater risk of development of ARDS and death likely owing to less rigorous immune response. Although high fever was associated with the development of ARDS, it was also associated with better outcomes among patients with ARDS. Moreover, treatment with methylprednisolone may be beneficial for patients who develop ARDS.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care Planning/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL