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Schwartz, Ken, Madan, Robert, Kates, Nick, Kates, Nick, Rajji, Tarek, Rajji, Tarek, Kates, Nick, Aelick, Katelynn, Bretzlaff, Monica, Colborne, Debbie Hewitt, Judd, Teresa, McConnell, Jillian, Seguin, Jacquie, Turcotte, Kylie, Liu, Linda, Colborne, Debbie Hewitt, Fortin, Natasha, McConnell, Jillian, Lesiuk, Nancy, Glover, Terri, Koop, Jennifer, Judd, Teresa, Madan, Robert, Schwartz, Kenneth, Colman, Sarah, Tau, Michael, Stanley, Claire, Colman, Sarah, Stanley, Claire, Tau, Michael, Colman, Sarah, Seitz, Dallas, Checkland, Claire, Benjamin, Sophiya, Bruneau, Marie-Andree, Cappella, Antonia, Cassidy, Beverley, Conn, David, Grief, Cindy, Keng, Alvin, Iaboni, Andrea, Grigorovich, Alisa, Kontoa, Pia, Astell, Arlene, McMurray, Josephine, Chu, Charlene, Rodrigues, Kevin, Barned, Claudia, Dementia Isolation Toolkit, Team, Thoo, Vanessa, Giddens-Zuker, Leslie, Benjamin, Sophiya, Ho, Joanne, Carthew, Julie, Cox, Lindsay, Rofaiel, Rymon, Burhan, Amer, Guseva, Elena, Iaboni, Andrea, Herrmann, Nathan, Seitz, Dallas, Burhan, Amer M.; Lanctot, Krista, Lim, Andrew, Wilchesky, Machelle, Iaboni, Andrea, Spasojevic, Sofija, Newman, Kristine, Schindel-Martin, Lori, Ye, Bing, Soltan, Aurelia, Blair, Mervin, McGregor, Carolyn, Burhan, Amer M.; Skosireva, Anna, Gobessi, Linda, Douglass, Alan, Kirkham, Julia, Seitz, Dallas, Goodarzi, Zahra, Denis, Emily St, Malvern, Riley, Sivanthanan, Saskia, Christie, Nathan, Canfield, Amanda, Rowa, Karen, Cassidy, Beverley, Eskes, Gail, Wilson, Ryan, Cassidy, Beverley, Wilton, Steven, Zamora, Nick, Alders, Ashley, Cassidy, Beverley, Wilton, Steven, Checkland, Claire, Zamora, Nick, Alders, Ashley, Kirkham, Julia, Freeland, Alison, Wilkes, Chris, Urness, Doug, Conn, David, Rabheru, Kiran, Checkland, Claire, Cassidy, Keri-Leigh, Rabheru, Kiran, Conn, David, Checkland, Claire, Seitz, Dallas, Abdool, Petal, Mulsant, Benoit H.; Rajji, Tarek K.; Kinjal, Patel, Thitiporn, Supasitthumrong, Seitz, Dallas, Rej, Soham, Clemens, Sara, Heer, Carrie, Devitt, Audrey, Yu, Song Yang, Rostas, Aviva, Cumberbatch, Simonne, Tafler, Melissa, Iroanyah, Ngozi Faith, Sivananthan, Saskia, Apostolides, Haridos, Jaggers, Kaitlyn, Badali, Jocelyn, Guimond, Josée, Sivananthan, Saskia, Martin-Zement, Isabelle, Nadeau-Lessard, Marie-Isabelle, Davies, Kelly, Schryburt-Brown, Kim, Benjamin, Sophiya, Morrison, Adam, Kay, Kelly, Young, Kevin, Kim, Doyoung, Kiss, Alex, Bronskill, Susan E.; Lanctot, Krista L.; Herrmann, Nathan, Gallagher, Damien, Kumar, Sanjeev, Joseph, Shaylyn, Patterson, Rachel, Wang, Wei, Blumberger, Daniel, Rajji, Tarek, Nunes, Paula Villela, Haidar, Atmis Medeiros, Mancine, Livia, Neves, Beatriz Astolfi, Leite, Renata Elaine Paraizo, Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto, Lafer, Beny, Salvini, Rogerio, Suemoto, Claudia Kimie, King, Annalee, Daniel, Geoff, Hooper, Nancy, Easson-Bruno, Sandra, Lennard, Tamara Nowak, Greco, Martina, Greco, Martina, Veri, Sabrina, Bol, Alexa, Mullaly, Laura, Ostrom, Caroline, Huynh, Dan, Kong, Alice, Thorpe, Lilian, Payne, Sarah, Saperson, Karen, Brown, Michael, Levinson, Anthony, Levinson, Anthony, Payne, Sarah, Hategan, Ana, Esliger, Mandy, Singh, Kathleen, Hickey, Catherine, Chisholm, Terry, Sokoloff, Lisa, Checkland, Claire, Guraya, Jasmeen, Conn, David, Rabheru, Kiran, Seitz, Dallas, Feldman, Sid, Ewa, Vivian, Hunter, Andrea, Conn, David, Rabheru, Kiran, Checkland, Claire, Lee-Cheong, Stephen, Amanullah, Shabbir, Jarvie, Ann, Van Berkum, Amy, Graf, Shauna, Mansour, Reham, Amanallah, Shabbir, Golas, Angela C.; Elgallab, Bishoy M.; Abdool, Petal S.; Bowie, Christopher R.; Rajji, Tarek K.; Cuperfain, Ari, Furqan, Zainab, Sinyor, Mark, Shulman, Kenneth, Zaheer, Juveria, Wathra, Rafae, Mulsant, Benoit, Reynolds, Charles, Lenze, Eric, Karp, Jordan, Daskalakis, Zafiris, Blumberger, Daniel, Gough, Amy, Cassidy, Keri-Leigh, Vallis, Michael, Robinson-Dexter, Jean, Jasrai, Ashitija, Amanullah, Shabbir, Bolshin, Lisa, Khatri, Nasreen, Ryan, Jennifer.
Canadian geriatrics journal : CGJ ; 25(1):88-109, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1749133
2.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) ; 79(9):2124-2124, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1751353
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-321887

ABSTRACT

Currently, there is no specific treatment for COVID-19 proven by clinical trials. WHO and CDC guidelines therefore endorse supportive care only. However, frontline clinicians have been applying several virus-based and host-based therapeutics in order to combat SARS-CoV-2. Medications from COVID-19 case reports, observational studies and the COVID-19 Treatment Guideline issued by the China's National Health Commission (7th edition published March 3rd, 2020. Edited translation attached) are evaluated in this review. Key evidence from relevant in vitro researches, animal models and clinical studies in SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV are examined. Antiviral therapies remdesivir, lopinavir/ritonavir and umifenovir, if considered, could be initiated before the peak of viral replication for optimal outcomes. Ribavirin may be beneficial as an add-on therapy and is ineffective as a monotherapy. Corticosteroids use should be limited without indicating comorbidities. IVIG is not recommended due to lack of data in COVID-19. Xuebijing may benefit patients with complications of bacterial pneumonia or sepsis. The efficacy of interferon is unclear due to conflicting outcomes in SARS and MERS studies. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have shown in vitro inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 and may be beneficial as both prophylactic and treatment therapy. For patients who developed cytokine release syndrome, interleukin-6 inhibitors may be beneficial. Given the rapid disease spread and increasing mortality, active treatment with readily available medications may be considered timely prior to disease progression.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310367

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly and has become a world health threaten. Its risk factors with death were still unknow. White blood cells (WBC) as a reflection of inflammation had play a vital role in COVID-19, however its level with death were still not know. Methods: In this retrospective, single-center study, all confirmed patients with COVID-19 on admission at West Branch of Union Hospital from Jan 29 to Feb 28, were collected and analyzed. Demographic and clinical data including laboratory examinations were analyzed and compared between recovery and death patients. Results: : A total of 163 patients including 33 death cases were included in this study. Significant associations were found between WBC level and death (HR = 1.14, 95%CI: 1.09-1.20, p<0.001). The regression analysis results showed there was a significant association between WBC level and death (HR = 5.72, 95%CI: 2.21-14.82, p < 0.001) when use the second quartile as a cutoff value (> 6.16×10

5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308249

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Explore the efficacy of corticosteroid treatment in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia and the association between corticosteroid use and patient mortality. Methods: A retrospective investigation was made on the medical records of the patients with severe and critical patients with COVID-19 pneumonia from January to February 2020. First, the patients who received corticosteroid treatment were compared with patients without given corticosteroid treatment. Then a propensity score matching method was used to control confounding factors. Cox survival regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of corticosteroid therapy on the mortality of severe and critical patients with COVID-19. Results: A total of 371 severe and critical patients were enrolled in our statistics. 209 patients were treated with corticosteroid therapy. Most of them were treated with methylprednisolone (197[94.3%]). The median corticosteroid therapy was applied 3(IQR 2–6) days after admission, 13(IQR 10–17) days after symptoms appeared. Temperature on admission(OR = 1.255,[95%CI 1.021–1.547],p = 0.032), ventilation(OR = 1.926,[95%CI 1.148–3.269],p = 0.014) and ICU admission(OR = 3.713, [95%CI 1.776–8.277],p < 0.001) were significantly associated with corticosteroids use. After PS matching, the cox regression survival analysis showed that corticosteroid use was significantly associated with a lower mortality rate (HR = 0.592, [95%CI 0.406–0.862], p = 0.006). Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy use in severe and critical patients with COVID-19 pneumonia leads to lower mortality but may cause other side effects. Corticosteroid therapy should be used carefully.

6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315615

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2020, Covid-19 pneumonia has had a great impact on human health in although the countries around the world, it brings serious threaten to people’s lives and resulted in serious economic losses. At the same time, a lot news about the detection of Covid-19 in food emerges endlessly, a rapid and high selectivity detection method or technology is in urgent need for its ability to help relevant departments effectively control the epidemic situation and ensuring people’s lives and property safety. In recent years, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has been certified as a quick and highly selective technique to detect foodborne microorganisms. Results In this paper, a newly developed microchip with polydopamine-coated paper based on LAMP was fabricated. This microchip consists of nine chambers for sampling and reactions, the targeted nucleic acid of foodborne pathogens was labeled by calcein fluorescence rather than SYBR. The microchip is advantageous of lower cost of materials and simple pretreated methods, and is easy to operate without the need for complex controlled fluid flow. The LAMP procedure and fluorescence detection of pathogens can be carried on the chip without opening the lid, preventing aerosol contamination and reducing the probability of false positives. In experiments, the LAMP reaction conditions including the optimal reaction temperature and reaction time are thoroughly discussed and have been executed for various foodborne bacteria samples, including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7), Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus). Testing of E. coli O157:H7 proved to be highly selective and sensitive (as low as 0.0134 ng µL − 1 ). Additionally, experimental test of real milk sample was figured, the complete detection duration time was within 68 min, the limit of detection(LOD) for Salmonella spp. was determined to be lower than 12 CFU mL − 1 . Conclusion In summary, a newly developed LAMP microchip with polydopamine-coated and calcein fluorescence labeling paper-based provides a lower cost, easy to use, highly selective, and multiplexable pathogen detection capability with great promise as a rapid, highly efficient, and economical solution for future foodborne pathogen testing.

8.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 2237-2249, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664417

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is still ongoing and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants are circulating worldwide, an increasing number of breakthrough infections are being detected despite the good efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines. Data on 88 COVID-19 breakthrough cases (breakthrough infections group) and 41 unvaccinated cases (unvaccinated group) from June 1 to August 22, 2021, were extracted from a cloud database established at Beijing Ditan Hospital to evaluate the clinical, immunological, and genomic characteristics of COVID-19 breakthrough infections. Among these 129 COVID-19 cases, 33 whole genomes were successfully sequenced, of which 23 were Delta variants, including 15 from the breakthrough infections group. Asymptomatic and mild cases predominated in both groups, but two patients developed severe disease in the unvaccinated group. The median time of viral shedding in the breakthrough infections group was significantly lower than that in the unvaccinated group (p = 0.003). In the breakthrough infections group, the IgG titers showed a significantly increasing trend (p = 0.007), and the CD4 + T lymphocyte count was significantly elevated (p = 0.018). For people infected with the Delta variant in the two groups, no significant difference was observed in either the quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction results or viral shedding time. In conclusion, among vaccinated patients, the cases of COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough infections were mainly asymptomatic and mild, IgG titers were significantly increased and rose rapidly, and the viral shedding time was shorter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Beijing/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Genomics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
9.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(6): 978-992, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595142

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study uses the unique setting created by the coronavirus crisis in China during the peak period of the pandemic to examine the behavioral factors affecting the decision of the Chinese people to adopt the precautionary actions recommended by the government. METHODS: Using the social app WeChat, we conducted a cross sectional study of the Chinese people in mid-February 2020. RESULTS: Our results show that higher levels of dispositional optimism and support for the government's actions for managing the epidemic were positively correlated with the compliance level. In addition, women and married participants were more likely to comply with the recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: Optimism and support for government actions should be considered when promoting policies related to health behavior such as social distancing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 212-226, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585243

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence of COVID-19 variants has necessitated the development of new vaccines that stimulate the formation of high levels of neutralizing antibodies against S antigen variants. A new strategy involves the intradermal administration of heterologous vaccines composed of one or two doses of inactivated vaccine and a booster dose with the mutated S1 protein (K-S). Such vaccines improve the immune efficacy by increasing the neutralizing antibody titers and promoting specific T cell responses against five variants of the RBD protein. A viral challenge test with the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant confirmed that both administration schedules (i.e. "1 + 1" and "2 + 1") ensured protection against this strain. These results suggest that the aforementioned strategy is effective for protecting against new variants and enhances the anamnestic immune response in the immunized population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetulus , Female , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells
11.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-295297

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence of new variants in the COVID-19 pandemic has led to new requirements for vaccines, with a focus on the capacity of vaccines to elicit high levels of neutralizing antibodies with specific recognition of S antigen variants based on the characterized vaccines licensed for use. A new strategy involving a heterologous vaccine composed of one or two doses of inactivated vaccine and a boost with the S1 protein with mutations (K-S) administered via the intradermal route was designed in this work and was found to improve immune efficacy by increasing neutralizing antibody titers and promoting specific T cell responses against 5 variants of the RBD peptide. A viral challenge test with the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant confirmed that the both schedules of “1+1” and “2+1” administration ensured a clinical protective effect against this strain. All of these results not only suggested the feasibility of our strategy for protecting against new variants but also provided a technical pathway to enhance the anamnestic immune response in the immunized population.

12.
Am Heart J ; 243: 77-86, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regulatory agencies have endorsed more limited approaches to clinical trial site monitoring. However, the impact of different monitoring strategies on trial conduct and outcomes is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a patient-level block-randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of intensive versus limited monitoring on cardiovascular clinical trial conduct and outcomes nested within the CoreValve Continued Access and Expanded Use Studies. Intensive monitoring included complete source data verification of all critical datapoints whereas limited monitoring included automated data checks only. This study's endpoints included clinical trial outcome ascertainment as well as monitoring action items, protocol deviations, and adverse event ascertainment. RESULTS: A total of 2,708 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and were randomized to either intensive monitoring (n = 1,354) or limited monitoring (n = 1,354). Monitoring action items were more common with intensive monitoring (52% vs 15%; P < .001), but there was no difference in the percentage of patients with any protocol deviation (91.6% vs 90.4%; P = .314). The reported incidence of trial outcomes between intensive and limited monitoring was similar for mortality (30 days: 4.8% vs 5.5%, P = .442; 1 year: 20.3% vs 21.3%, P = .473) and stroke (30 days: 2.8% vs 2.4%, P = .458), as well as most secondary trial outcomes with the exception of bleeding (intensive: 36.3% vs limited: 32.0% at 30 days, P = .019). There was a higher reported incidence of cardiac adverse events reported in the intensive monitoring group at 1 year (76.7% vs 72.4%; P = .019). CONCLUSIONS: Tailored limited monitoring strategies can be implemented without influencing the integrity of TAVR trial outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Stroke , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects , Humans , Incidence , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/prevention & control , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Treatment Outcome
14.
J Affect Disord ; 296: 315-321, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of medical students in China have experienced home confinement and a reliance on online resources to study medicine since the outbreak of COVID-19. More time spent studying online during the COVID-19 pandemic may be a potential risk factor for problematic smartphone use, since smartphones have become the most commonly used device for accessing the internet. The objective of the present study was to explore the association between anxiety, smartphone problematic use and sleep disturbance among medical students during the enforced COVID-19 home confinement. METHODS: Altogether, 666 medical students validly answered a self-administered questionnaire, which included the Chinese version of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, Smartphone addiction scale - short version, and the PROMIS Sleep Disturbance scale (short form). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were employed to explore the associated factors of anxiety. Structural equation modeling was conducted to test hypothesized associations. RESULTS: Anxiety was significantly associated with problematic smartphone use and sleep disturbance among medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Problematic smartphone use not only directly affected anxiety, but also exerted a significant indirect effect on anxiety via sleep disturbance. A significant decrease of the path coefficient of problematic smartphone use on anxiety (from ß=0.53 to ß=0.22, P<0.01) was observed with sleep disturbance being modeled as a mediator. LIMITATIONS: Limitations include its cross-sectional design and samples recruited from only one medical school. CONCLUSIONS: The detrimental impact of problematic smartphone use and the importance of sleep health on mitigating anxiety should be highlighted and incorporated into medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Smartphone
17.
China CDC Wkly ; 2(34): 645-650, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355404

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS TOPIC?: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic, while the profile of antibody response against the COVID-19 virus has not been well clarified. WHAT IS ADDED BY THIS REPORT?: In this study, 210 serum samples from 160 confirmed COVID-19 cases with different disease severities were recruited. The IgM, IgA, IgG, and neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against COVID-19 virus were determined. Our findings indicated that four antibodies could be detectable at low levels within 2 weeks of disease onset, then rapidly increasing and peaking from the 3rd to 5th Weeks. NAb decreased between 5th and 9th Weeks, and a higher IgM/IgA level was observed in the groups with mild/moderate severity within 2 weeks (p<0.05), while all 4 types of antibodies were higher in the group with severe/critical severity after 4 weeks (p<0.05). WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE?: Our study on the dynamics of serological antibody responses against COVID-19 virus among COVID-19 patients complements the recognition regarding the humoral immune response to COVID-19 virus infection. The findings will help in the interpretation of antibody detection results for COVID-19 patients and be beneficial for the evaluation of vaccination effects.

18.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(1): e0027321, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341310

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant has increased sharply in numbers worldwide and is reported to be more contagious than the nonvariant. Little is known regarding the detailed clinical features of B.1.1.7 variant infection. Data on 74 COVID-19 cases from two outbreaks in two districts of Beijing, China were extracted from a cloud database, including 41 cases from Shunyi District (Shunyi B.1.470 group) and 33 from Daxing (Daxing B.1.1.7 group) from December 25, 2020 to January 17, 2021. We conducted a comparison of the clinical characteristics. Seven clinical indicators of the Daxing B.1.1.7 group were significantly higher than those of the Shunyi group, including the proportion with fever over 38°C, the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), creatine kinase (CK), d-dimer (DD), and CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ T), and the proportion with ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the lung (P values of ≤0.05). After adjusting for age, B.1.1.7 variant infection was a risk factor for elevated CRP (P = 0·045), SAA (P = 0·011), CK (P = 0·034), and CD4+ T (P = 0.029) and for the presence of GGO (P = 0.005). The median threshold cycle (CT) value of reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) tests of the N gene target in the Daxing B.1.1.7 group was significantly lower (P = 0.036) than that in the Shunyi B.1.470 group. Clinical features, including a more serious inflammatory response, pneumonia, and a possibly higher viral load, were detected in the cases infected with B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2. The B.1.1.7 variant may have increased pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant, which was first identified in the United Kingdom, has increased sharply in numbers worldwide and was reported to be more contagious than the nonvariant. To our knowledge, no studies investigating the detailed clinical features of COVID-19 cases infected with the B.1.1.7 variant have been published. Local epidemics have rarely occurred in China, but occasionally, a small clustered outbreak triggered by an imported SARS-CoV-2 strain with only one chain of transmission could happen. From late 2020 to early 2021, two clustered COVID-19 outbreaks occurred in Beijing, one of which was caused by the B.1.1.7 variant. The COVID-19 patients from the two outbreaks received similar clinical tests, diagnoses, and treatments. We found that the B.1.1.7 variant infection could lead to a more serious inflammatory response, acute response process, more severe pneumonia, and probably higher viral loads. This therefore implies that the B.1.1.7 variant may have increased pathogenicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Viral Load , Whole Genome Sequencing
20.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(8)2021 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335019

ABSTRACT

Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) and computed tomography (CT) can both be used for diagnosis of interstitial pneumonia caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but the agreement between LUS and CT is unknown. Purpose to compare the agreement of LUS and CT in the diagnosis of interstitial pneumonia caused by COVID-19. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed, Cochrane library, Embase, Chinese Biomedicine Literature, and WHO COVID-19 databases to identify studies that compared LUS with CT in the diagnosis of interstitial pneumonia caused by COVID-19. We calculated the pooled overall, positive and negative percent agreements, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and the area under the standard receiver operating curve (SROC) for LUS in the diagnosis of COVID-19 compared with CT. Results We identified 1896 records, of which nine studies involving 531 patients were finally included. The pooled overall, positive and negative percentage agreements of LUS for the diagnosis of interstitial pneumonia caused by COVID-19 compared with CT were 81% (95% confidence interval [CI] 43-99%), 96% (95% CI, 80-99%, I2 = 92.15%) and 80% (95%CI, 60-92%, I2 = 92.85%), respectively. DOR was 37.41 (95% CI, 9.43-148.49, I2 = 63.9%), and the area under the SROC curve was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.92-0.96). The quality of evidence for both specificity and sensitivity was low because of heterogeneity and risk of bias. Conclusion The level of diagnostic agreement between LUS and CT in the diagnosis of interstitial pneumonia caused by COVID-19 is high. LUS can be therefore considered as an equally accurate alternative for CT in situations where molecular tests are not available.

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