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1.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:2, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880122
2.
38th International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction, ISARC 2021 ; 2021-November:521-528, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787316

ABSTRACT

Spatial conflicts affect crews’ productivity and workers’ safety. The idea of considering workspaces as a limited resource has brought a remarkable contribution to the effectiveness of traditional scheduling techniques that generally do not consider the spatial-temporal dimension of construction activities. In previous studies, the detection of spatial interferences among main workspaces has proven to be an effective way to track down spatial issues inherent to the works schedule. In light of recent events, this research considers spatial interferences among workspaces as occasions of COVID-19 transmission, which must be avoided. The number of spatial issues detected in previous studies must be extended by also including spatial conflicts affecting crews moving to and from main workspaces in transfer spaces (i.e., the support workspaces). A BIM-based spatial conflict simulator, integrated within the work planning process and developed using a serious game engine, is presented in this study and tested on a real work scenario. The possibility of simulating working operations in gaming environments enables investigating on how behavioral constraints, such as social distancing, can be considered during work planning. The first research outcome is that the developed prototype can read the work plan and the BIM model to provide spatial interferences due not only to the main but also to the support workspaces. The second research outcome, emerged from our preliminary simulations, is that even in a short time span (e.g., 2 days and 3 activities), interferences involving support workspaces account for 33% of the complete list of detected conflicts. © 2021 Proceedings of the International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction. All rights reserved.

3.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention ; 31(1 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677445

ABSTRACT

Background: Comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans are region-specific blueprints that identify cancer priorities and health equity informed strategies to address cancer burden and are supported by the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Although CCC plans are created by stakeholder coalitions, few have focused on community engaged approaches, which may diminish their applicability for community members. Thus, in preparation for its forthcoming 2022-2027 CCC plan, the Illinois Comprehensive Cancer Control Program collaborated with the University of Illinois Cancer Center's Community Engagement and Health Equity office to implement a community engagement strategy to address cancer burden. Objective: To describe the development and implementation of a community engagement strategy for the 2022-2027 Illinois CCC plan. Method: The goal of the community engagement strategy was to identify barriers, facilitating factors and recommendations related to cancer burden and equity in Illinois by engaging diverse community stakeholders. A statewide town hall and focus groups (FGs) were implemented in early 2021. Thedevelopment and analysis of the community engagement strategy were guided by the Model for Analysis of Population Health and Health Disparities, CDC's CHANGE Action Guide, and the Community ToolBox. Semistructured guides included questions about fundamental causes of health, social and physical contexts, individual demographics and risk factors, and biologic responses and pathways. The town hall was open to Illinoisians over 18 years of age. FG participants were selected using purposive sampling to maximize group heterogeneity. Eight FGs were held, one each for: rural residents, survivors, young survivors, caregivers, and Spanish speakers, and three that were a mix of community members. Town hall notes and FGs were analyzed using content analysis. Results were synthesized and a final report was included in the forthcoming plan. Results: Town hall and FG (n=8) participants (n=115) included cancer survivors (36%), caregivers (27%), Latinos (17%), African Americans (23%), and rural residents (14%). Throughout the development of the plan, data were continuously reviewed with the coalition developing the CCC Plan. The final report described multi-level factors that contribute to cancer disparities among Illinoisians, proposed recommendations to improve health across the cancer continuum across multiple levels, funding priorities, and the impact of COVID-19 on cancer care. Participant quotes supported strategies throughout the plan. Conclusion: A robust community engagement strategy for the forthcoming 2022-2027 Illinois CCC Plan was implemented through a successful academic-state public health department partnership. This strategy ensures that the plan reflects the expertise and voices of Illinoisians impacted by cancer. This engagement strategy, framed around health determinants that impact cancer risk and outcomes, may be replicated by other coalitions creating CCC plans.

5.
Revista Medica del Hospital General de Mexico ; 84(2):64-70, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1257507

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a worldwide challenge. There are few useful tools to predict patient outcomes. Identification of biomarkers able to predict progression of the disease could improve the treatment of these patients. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify biomarkers of disease progression among patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among severe COVID-19 pneumonia patients hospitalized in the American British Cowdray Medical Center in Mexico City. Disease progression was defined as use of vasoactive amines, need of non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation or death. Studied biomarkers included neutrophil/lymphocyte index, lymphocyte/platelet Ratio, C reactive protein, procalcitonin, D Dimer, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), ferritin, 25–OH–Vitamin D, and interleukin 6. Results: We report 46 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Mean age was 51 years, the majority of whom 30 (65%) male. Median hospitalization was 9 days. 23 (50%) of patients presented disease progression. Ferritin and LDH were strongly associated with disease progression among our cohort. In addition, age was associated with worst prognosis with a relative risk 4.5 (1.2-16.9, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Age, ferritin, and LDH were associated with disease progression among patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.

6.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):238, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250842

ABSTRACT

Background: The accuracy of rapid antigen tests (RAT) SARS-CoV-2 for in children is unknown. Our aim was to determine the diagnostic accuracy and concordance of the RAT PanBioTM (Abbott) compared to RT-PCR in nasopharyngeal smear (NPS) samples, in symptomatic pediatric population. Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective, multicentre clinical study nested in a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study. We included pediatric patients aged 0 to 16 years with symptoms consistent with COVID-19 of ≤5 days of evolution, attended in the Emergency Departments of the seven centers involved. A total of two consecutive NPS were obtained from each patient: one was employed to perform the RAT and the other to perform RT-PCR. Sample size for a non-inferiority study was calculated considering 80% power, for a 5% prevalence and a 90% sensitivity, using RT-PCR as the gold standard reference. A confusion matrix was displayed. Non-inferiority of sensitivity and specificity between diagnostic tests was assessed using the McNemar's test. The agreement between the two methods was calculated using Cohen's kappa index. Results: A total of 1620 patients were tested in 7 hospitals. The overall sensitivity for RAT PanBioTM was 45.4% (95%CI, 34.1-57.2), and specificity was 99.8% (95%CI, 99.4-99.9) (Figure 1). The positive predictive value (PPV) for this 4.8% prevalence was 92.5% (95%CI, 78.6-97.4). The negative predictive value was 97.3 % (95%CI, 96.8-97.8). Positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was high - 233.8 (IC 95%, 73.5-743.3), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was low - 0.54 (95%CI, 0.44-0.67). Conclusion: Compared to RT-PCR, the sensitivity of the RAT PanBioTM was low in children with <5 days of symptoms of COVID-19. The specificity and PLR were good, and the NLR and concordance with RT-PCR were only moderate. These results suggest that the test is very good when the result is positive, and that the test has only a limited value when the result is negative. In relation with screening and public health policy, these results should be interpreted considering also rapidness, availability and false positives ratio compared to RT-PCR or other tests.

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