Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Microorganisms ; 10(8)2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987895

ABSTRACT

Recently, numerous cases of monkeypox were reported from several non-endemic countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania, suggesting an unusual and alarming public health issue, particularly considering that the disease is not directly related to human or animal travels. Attention is currently being drawn to this phenomenon since more than 70% of the global population is no longer vaccinated against smallpox. Indeed, the smallpox vaccination also confers some indirect degree of protection against other poxviruses, including monkeypox. We performed a narrative review to describe the existing literature with regard to monkeypox using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. This review aims to provide updated evidence of findings on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and prevention of monkeypox, also considering the concurrent zoonotic pandemic caused by the COVID-19 coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

2.
Psychogeriatrics ; 22(3): 402-412, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673279

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic may have a disproportionate impact on people with dementia/mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to isolation and loss of services. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in people living with dementia/MCI. Two authors searched major electronic databases from inception to June 2021 for observational studies investigating COVID-19 and NPS in people with dementia/MCI. Summary estimates of mean differences in NPS scores pre- versus post-COVID-19 were calculated using a random-effects model, weighting cases using inverse variance. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. From 2730 citations, 21 studies including 7139 patients (60.0% female, mean age 75.6 ± 7.9 years, 4.0% MCI) with dementia were evaluated in the review. Five studies found no changes in NPS, but in all other studies, an increase in at least one NPS or the pre-pandemic Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) score was found. The most common aggravated NPS were depression, anxiety, agitation, irritability, and apathy during lockdown, but 66.7% of the studies had a high bias. Seven studies including 420 patients (22.1% MCI) yielded enough data to be included in the meta-analysis. The mean follow-up time was 5.9 ± 1.5 weeks. The pooled increase in NPI score before compared to during COVID-19 was 3.85 (95% CI:0.43 to 7.27; P = 0.03; I2  = 82.4%). All studies had high risk of bias. These results were characterized by high heterogeneity, but there was no presence of publication bias. There is an increase in the worsening of NPS in people living with dementia/MCI during lockdown in the COVID pandemic. Future comparative studies are needed to elucidate whether a similar deterioration might occur in people without dementia/MCI.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Dementia , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Communicable Disease Control , Dementia/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics
3.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci ; 77(4): e111-e114, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305418

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Only a few studies have been carried out with a large sample size on the relationship between chronic conditions and hospitalization for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and there is no research examining recently diagnosed conditions. Our purpose was to evaluate this association in a large sample including the older population from Europe and Israel. METHOD: Data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe COVID-19 Survey, a representative survey of individuals aged 50 or older residing in 27 European countries and Israel, were retrieved. Associations between recently diagnosed chronic conditions (ie, conditions detected over the last 3 years) (exposure) and hospitalization due to COVID-19 (outcome) were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 51 514 participants on average 71.0 (SD = 9.2) years old were included. Participants with multimorbidity (ie, 2 or more recently diagnosed conditions) had significantly higher odds for COVID-19 hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.91 [95% CI = 2.14-7.12]). Independent conditions such as lung disease (AOR = 16.94 [95% CI = 9.27-30.95]), heart disease (AOR = 3.29 [95% CI = 1.50-7.21]), or cancer (AOR = 3.45 [95% CI = 1.26-9.48]) showed particularly high odds for hospitalization due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: People with recently diagnosed diseases, and in particular those having lung disease, heart disease, or cancer, were significantly more likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Multimorbidity , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 103: 599-606, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970735

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and chloroquine (CQ) are anti-malarial drugs frequently used in the rheumatologic field. They were recently identified as potential therapeutic options for Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). The present study aims to map and grade the diverse health outcomes associated with HCQ/CQ using an umbrella review approach. METHODS: Umbrella review of systematic reviews of observational and intervention studies. For observational studies, random-effects summary effect size, 95% confidence interval, and 95% prediction interval were estimated. We also assessed heterogeneity, evidence for small-study effect, and evidence for excess significance bias. The quality of evidence was then graded using validated criteria from highly convincing to weak. The evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) tool. RESULTS: From 313 articles returned in the literature search, six meta-analyses were included (n = 25 outcomes). Among meta-analyses (MAs) of observational studies, HCQ/CQ are weakly associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular events and diabetes when used for autoimmune diseases and with spontaneous abortion; they are also associated with a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients. Among MAs of RCTs, HCQ/CQ are associated with an improvement of articular manifestations of rheumatic diseases. CONCLUSIONS: There is high evidence of the efficacy of HCQ/CQ in the rheumatologic field. The lack of evidence for efficacy and the risk of death associated with the use of HCQ/CQ for COVID-19 indicate the inappropriateness of their inclusion in recent COVID-19 therapy guidelines and the urgent need for RCTs to determine eventual appropriateness as a COVID-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL